Flamborough house league 3-on-3 tourney gives players last ice time of the year

Community Mar 24, 2016 Flamborough Review

By Julia Lovett, Review staff

Young hockey enthusiasts took to the ice last weekend for one last chance to feel the ice beneath their blades.

At the Flamborough Hockey Association (FHA) house league three-on-three tournament, young players learned what it meant to work as a team and succeed.

“This is one last fun day to just say, ‘You know what? What a great season, let’s come out and have a really fun day with your team,’”said Leanne Cleland, secretary and media relations director with the FHA.

The March 19 tournament, which saw six players on the ice at one time, was held at the Harry Howell Arena on Sat., March 18 from dawn until late into the evening. During the day, about 280 players from the initiation, bantam, peewee, atom and novice divisions had a chance to have serious ice time and try out different skills they learned throughout the season.

“You really can try different things when there’s only six players on the ice, you can get into more passing because you don’t have as many players around,” Cleland said in a phone interview with the Flamborough Review.

“You can build some confidence around passing and handling the puck more with more open ice,” she added.

For those who are unfamiliar with the smaller set-up, Cleland explained that a three-on-three game, while similar to traditional hockey, is quite defined and unique in its rules.

The game is played in shifts with a faster turnaround time for players to be on the ice, which, depending on the age of the player may vary. It is meant to keep the skaters moving with minimal bench time so there is more space on the ice that allows the players to practice puck and stick handling. Three-on-three is a fun, fast-paced and less competitive version to its traditional counterpart.

Along with not having offsides, there are fewer faceoffs during the game.

“It’s literally continuous, so wherever the puck is, the people on the ice leave as quickly as they can to the bench and the people from the bench race off onto the ice to go to wherever the puck is,” Cleland said.

In an email, she explained that there were some exciting moments throughout the tournament, with more than one game going into a shootout.

“We even saw a breakaway by an atom goalie attempting to score while the opposing team was on a shift change,” said Cleland via email.

The day, she explained, was an exciting one that through the help of parents, organizers and volunteers was a success.

The secretary explained that through the house league program and the FHA, the teams subscribe to a “building character through sport” mandate that ensures all players who get involved with a team will have ice time.

Regardless of skill level, she said it was a way that everyone will get a fair shot – hopefully at the net.

“It really is a great opportunity to develop different skills and to have a lot of fun with the team that they played with all year and it’s in a very different environment,” she said, noting it was a good way for the association to give back to the players for another great season.

The hockey youngsters relish the extra ice time, too, she said.

“I think they love the fast pace of this game because they’re on the ice so much that they’re a huge part of the game,” she said.

Flamborough house league 3-on-3 tourney gives players last ice time of the year

Community Mar 24, 2016 Flamborough Review

By Julia Lovett, Review staff

Young hockey enthusiasts took to the ice last weekend for one last chance to feel the ice beneath their blades.

At the Flamborough Hockey Association (FHA) house league three-on-three tournament, young players learned what it meant to work as a team and succeed.

“This is one last fun day to just say, ‘You know what? What a great season, let’s come out and have a really fun day with your team,’”said Leanne Cleland, secretary and media relations director with the FHA.

The March 19 tournament, which saw six players on the ice at one time, was held at the Harry Howell Arena on Sat., March 18 from dawn until late into the evening. During the day, about 280 players from the initiation, bantam, peewee, atom and novice divisions had a chance to have serious ice time and try out different skills they learned throughout the season.

“You really can try different things when there’s only six players on the ice, you can get into more passing because you don’t have as many players around,” Cleland said in a phone interview with the Flamborough Review.

“You can build some confidence around passing and handling the puck more with more open ice,” she added.

For those who are unfamiliar with the smaller set-up, Cleland explained that a three-on-three game, while similar to traditional hockey, is quite defined and unique in its rules.

The game is played in shifts with a faster turnaround time for players to be on the ice, which, depending on the age of the player may vary. It is meant to keep the skaters moving with minimal bench time so there is more space on the ice that allows the players to practice puck and stick handling. Three-on-three is a fun, fast-paced and less competitive version to its traditional counterpart.

Along with not having offsides, there are fewer faceoffs during the game.

“It’s literally continuous, so wherever the puck is, the people on the ice leave as quickly as they can to the bench and the people from the bench race off onto the ice to go to wherever the puck is,” Cleland said.

In an email, she explained that there were some exciting moments throughout the tournament, with more than one game going into a shootout.

“We even saw a breakaway by an atom goalie attempting to score while the opposing team was on a shift change,” said Cleland via email.

The day, she explained, was an exciting one that through the help of parents, organizers and volunteers was a success.

The secretary explained that through the house league program and the FHA, the teams subscribe to a “building character through sport” mandate that ensures all players who get involved with a team will have ice time.

Regardless of skill level, she said it was a way that everyone will get a fair shot – hopefully at the net.

“It really is a great opportunity to develop different skills and to have a lot of fun with the team that they played with all year and it’s in a very different environment,” she said, noting it was a good way for the association to give back to the players for another great season.

The hockey youngsters relish the extra ice time, too, she said.

“I think they love the fast pace of this game because they’re on the ice so much that they’re a huge part of the game,” she said.

Flamborough house league 3-on-3 tourney gives players last ice time of the year

Community Mar 24, 2016 Flamborough Review

By Julia Lovett, Review staff

Young hockey enthusiasts took to the ice last weekend for one last chance to feel the ice beneath their blades.

At the Flamborough Hockey Association (FHA) house league three-on-three tournament, young players learned what it meant to work as a team and succeed.

“This is one last fun day to just say, ‘You know what? What a great season, let’s come out and have a really fun day with your team,’”said Leanne Cleland, secretary and media relations director with the FHA.

The March 19 tournament, which saw six players on the ice at one time, was held at the Harry Howell Arena on Sat., March 18 from dawn until late into the evening. During the day, about 280 players from the initiation, bantam, peewee, atom and novice divisions had a chance to have serious ice time and try out different skills they learned throughout the season.

“You really can try different things when there’s only six players on the ice, you can get into more passing because you don’t have as many players around,” Cleland said in a phone interview with the Flamborough Review.

“You can build some confidence around passing and handling the puck more with more open ice,” she added.

For those who are unfamiliar with the smaller set-up, Cleland explained that a three-on-three game, while similar to traditional hockey, is quite defined and unique in its rules.

The game is played in shifts with a faster turnaround time for players to be on the ice, which, depending on the age of the player may vary. It is meant to keep the skaters moving with minimal bench time so there is more space on the ice that allows the players to practice puck and stick handling. Three-on-three is a fun, fast-paced and less competitive version to its traditional counterpart.

Along with not having offsides, there are fewer faceoffs during the game.

“It’s literally continuous, so wherever the puck is, the people on the ice leave as quickly as they can to the bench and the people from the bench race off onto the ice to go to wherever the puck is,” Cleland said.

In an email, she explained that there were some exciting moments throughout the tournament, with more than one game going into a shootout.

“We even saw a breakaway by an atom goalie attempting to score while the opposing team was on a shift change,” said Cleland via email.

The day, she explained, was an exciting one that through the help of parents, organizers and volunteers was a success.

The secretary explained that through the house league program and the FHA, the teams subscribe to a “building character through sport” mandate that ensures all players who get involved with a team will have ice time.

Regardless of skill level, she said it was a way that everyone will get a fair shot – hopefully at the net.

“It really is a great opportunity to develop different skills and to have a lot of fun with the team that they played with all year and it’s in a very different environment,” she said, noting it was a good way for the association to give back to the players for another great season.

The hockey youngsters relish the extra ice time, too, she said.

“I think they love the fast pace of this game because they’re on the ice so much that they’re a huge part of the game,” she said.