Men Who Give a Damn meet April 20

Community Apr 13, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

An idea that started over a glass of beer soon became a viable plan to give back to the community.

The latest chapter of the organization 100 Men Who Give a Damn has formed in Hamilton and organizers are planning to hold the group’s inaugural meeting on Wed., April 20 at the Bay City Music Hall at 7:30 p.m.

“I really enjoy being part of the community I live in and I think this was a chance to do that,” said Copetown resident Jeremiah Pike, who cofounded the Hamilton-Wentworth chapter with his brother Nathan.

The organization began as an offshoot of 100 Women Who Care, a program that is now into its 10th year. According to Pike, the original organization grew in popularity because of a growing necessity for a women’s group.

He explained that Rotary clubs, while meaningful, can tend to be male-dominated. “I think 100 Women who Care really took off across Ontario,” he said.  

Both Women Who Care and Men Who Give a Damn aim to enrich the communities they are in by donating to up to four charities a year.

“The impact we’re going to have is going to be local and the imperative is that you have to be a member to nominate a charity,” said Pike.

Every charity that is nominated also has to be registered with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). “If that organization is going to be nominated as a local chapter, you have to know what those funds are going to be designated towards locally,” he said, referring to bigger groups such as Big Brothers Big Sisters or United Way that have chapters all over North America.  

“That organization has to have a plan in place and the member has to have an understanding that the organization’s going to take these funds that are raised and put them towards a local project or a local event,” he added.

According to Pike, 100 Men doesn’t have an administrative staff and the members have total control in making a direct contribution to a charity.

“I think it allows smaller charities that maybe are overlooked to get noticed and it really levels the playing field,” he said. “I think the simplicity really attracted me.”

Pike added that because Hamilton is a large area, he figured that there would be a large number of men who shared the same goals and ideals.

Members are required to join for at least one full year. Over the course of that time, they meet quarterly for an hour-long meeting to present which charities will receive donations.

Each member donates $100. Every member who attends a meeting can nominate a charity.

“All those charities are thrown into a hat and then we draw three of those charities,” said Pike. “So from the three that are drawn, that member gets five to seven minutes to talk to us about what that charity is.”

Once all the information is presented, each member casts a vote. The nomination that receives the most votes gets the donations

from the meeting.

As someone who wasn’t born in Hamilton and didn’t grow up there, Pike said he was looking to meet like-minded people.

“Raising a family here, I’m looking to create a network and really get to know the city that I’m going to raise my family and then live in.”

There are perks to being part of the club, he said, joking that since the meeting is held at Bay City Music Hall, which happens to be fully licensed, a member could choose to relax with a beer or a pop and socialize before the meeting, if they wish.

“(You can) meet some people that you’ve never met before and you know they’re there for the same reason you are.

“And that’s to give funds back to a local charity in the area.”

Men Who Give a Damn meet April 20

Copetown resident excited to launch Hamilton chapter of charitable group

Community Apr 13, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

An idea that started over a glass of beer soon became a viable plan to give back to the community.

The latest chapter of the organization 100 Men Who Give a Damn has formed in Hamilton and organizers are planning to hold the group’s inaugural meeting on Wed., April 20 at the Bay City Music Hall at 7:30 p.m.

“I really enjoy being part of the community I live in and I think this was a chance to do that,” said Copetown resident Jeremiah Pike, who cofounded the Hamilton-Wentworth chapter with his brother Nathan.

The organization began as an offshoot of 100 Women Who Care, a program that is now into its 10th year. According to Pike, the original organization grew in popularity because of a growing necessity for a women’s group.

He explained that Rotary clubs, while meaningful, can tend to be male-dominated. “I think 100 Women who Care really took off across Ontario,” he said.  

Both Women Who Care and Men Who Give a Damn aim to enrich the communities they are in by donating to up to four charities a year.

“The impact we’re going to have is going to be local and the imperative is that you have to be a member to nominate a charity,” said Pike.

Every charity that is nominated also has to be registered with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). “If that organization is going to be nominated as a local chapter, you have to know what those funds are going to be designated towards locally,” he said, referring to bigger groups such as Big Brothers Big Sisters or United Way that have chapters all over North America.  

“That organization has to have a plan in place and the member has to have an understanding that the organization’s going to take these funds that are raised and put them towards a local project or a local event,” he added.

According to Pike, 100 Men doesn’t have an administrative staff and the members have total control in making a direct contribution to a charity.

“I think it allows smaller charities that maybe are overlooked to get noticed and it really levels the playing field,” he said. “I think the simplicity really attracted me.”

Pike added that because Hamilton is a large area, he figured that there would be a large number of men who shared the same goals and ideals.

Members are required to join for at least one full year. Over the course of that time, they meet quarterly for an hour-long meeting to present which charities will receive donations.

Each member donates $100. Every member who attends a meeting can nominate a charity.

“All those charities are thrown into a hat and then we draw three of those charities,” said Pike. “So from the three that are drawn, that member gets five to seven minutes to talk to us about what that charity is.”

Once all the information is presented, each member casts a vote. The nomination that receives the most votes gets the donations

from the meeting.

As someone who wasn’t born in Hamilton and didn’t grow up there, Pike said he was looking to meet like-minded people.

“Raising a family here, I’m looking to create a network and really get to know the city that I’m going to raise my family and then live in.”

There are perks to being part of the club, he said, joking that since the meeting is held at Bay City Music Hall, which happens to be fully licensed, a member could choose to relax with a beer or a pop and socialize before the meeting, if they wish.

“(You can) meet some people that you’ve never met before and you know they’re there for the same reason you are.

“And that’s to give funds back to a local charity in the area.”

Men Who Give a Damn meet April 20

Copetown resident excited to launch Hamilton chapter of charitable group

Community Apr 13, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

An idea that started over a glass of beer soon became a viable plan to give back to the community.

The latest chapter of the organization 100 Men Who Give a Damn has formed in Hamilton and organizers are planning to hold the group’s inaugural meeting on Wed., April 20 at the Bay City Music Hall at 7:30 p.m.

“I really enjoy being part of the community I live in and I think this was a chance to do that,” said Copetown resident Jeremiah Pike, who cofounded the Hamilton-Wentworth chapter with his brother Nathan.

The organization began as an offshoot of 100 Women Who Care, a program that is now into its 10th year. According to Pike, the original organization grew in popularity because of a growing necessity for a women’s group.

He explained that Rotary clubs, while meaningful, can tend to be male-dominated. “I think 100 Women who Care really took off across Ontario,” he said.  

Both Women Who Care and Men Who Give a Damn aim to enrich the communities they are in by donating to up to four charities a year.

“The impact we’re going to have is going to be local and the imperative is that you have to be a member to nominate a charity,” said Pike.

Every charity that is nominated also has to be registered with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). “If that organization is going to be nominated as a local chapter, you have to know what those funds are going to be designated towards locally,” he said, referring to bigger groups such as Big Brothers Big Sisters or United Way that have chapters all over North America.  

“That organization has to have a plan in place and the member has to have an understanding that the organization’s going to take these funds that are raised and put them towards a local project or a local event,” he added.

According to Pike, 100 Men doesn’t have an administrative staff and the members have total control in making a direct contribution to a charity.

“I think it allows smaller charities that maybe are overlooked to get noticed and it really levels the playing field,” he said. “I think the simplicity really attracted me.”

Pike added that because Hamilton is a large area, he figured that there would be a large number of men who shared the same goals and ideals.

Members are required to join for at least one full year. Over the course of that time, they meet quarterly for an hour-long meeting to present which charities will receive donations.

Each member donates $100. Every member who attends a meeting can nominate a charity.

“All those charities are thrown into a hat and then we draw three of those charities,” said Pike. “So from the three that are drawn, that member gets five to seven minutes to talk to us about what that charity is.”

Once all the information is presented, each member casts a vote. The nomination that receives the most votes gets the donations

from the meeting.

As someone who wasn’t born in Hamilton and didn’t grow up there, Pike said he was looking to meet like-minded people.

“Raising a family here, I’m looking to create a network and really get to know the city that I’m going to raise my family and then live in.”

There are perks to being part of the club, he said, joking that since the meeting is held at Bay City Music Hall, which happens to be fully licensed, a member could choose to relax with a beer or a pop and socialize before the meeting, if they wish.

“(You can) meet some people that you’ve never met before and you know they’re there for the same reason you are.

“And that’s to give funds back to a local charity in the area.”