Hamilton Catholic school trustees have lively discussion on update to trustee code of conduct

Community Mar 20, 2017 by Julia Lovett Flamborough Review

Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board trustee for Wards 3 and 4, Tony Perri, didn't mince words during the board's recent debate on the updating its Trustee Code of Conduct.

“That defies all the laws of natural justice that you should know who your accusers are,” he said, referring to the second paragraph in the Procedures and Enforcement section during the March committee of the whole meeting. The section states if an allegation of a breach of the code becomes apparent, a trustee must bring it to the chair or director’s notice first no later than six weeks after a trustee learned about it.

“If Trustee “A” has a problem with Trustee “B,” they shouldn’t be allowed to circumvent everybody else and go straight to the chair or the director. They should bring it to the attention of the trustee,” Perri said, noting that it would be a different thing altogether if they would be allowed to bring the issue up with both the chair of the board and the trustee.

Chair Pat Daly said that it isn’t a criminal law case and explained that in a criminal case, a person does not have to approach their accuser before going to the authorities.

“Say … in the event of extremes that one trustee was afraid of another because of whatever the allegation was, then that individual should be permitted to go to the chair and the director to advance that concern,” he said to Perri, who conceded the point, but added that in less extreme cases, the first step should be to approach the trustee.

This update comes from a January revised draft of Multi-Year Strategic Planning (MYSP): A Guide for School Board Trustees that the Ministry of Education revised to help board members and administration go in the right direction.

“This report and the supporting information and efforts gives a look at phase four: the implementing and monitoring multi-year- strategic plan is what was offered to the committee,” said Dave Hansen, director of education, of the policy review committee’s report.

The first three steps: getting organized, gathering information and developing the plan happened starting in 2015 and by December of 2018, the next MYSP will be preparing for development.

According to the report, the draft guide for responsibilities of the senior administration include “develop logic models for each goals, develop annual plans and align them with MYSP, develop budget, monitor process and report the board. ”

Meanwhile the report goes on to suggest the trustees are recommended to approve budgets, share MYSP with the community, monitor the progress, review the plan on an annual basis, review the director’s performance and communicate with the public on the progress.

“Essentially, this looks at the existing strategic plan, but gives it a framework and some structure on how we would be able monitor the implementation of the plan,” said Hansen.

According to the director, there were three recommendations that were brought to the committee. First, that the report be approved, second, that the “evaluation framework and simple logic model” be approved and finally, that they have time to book a professional development session for senior staff and all trustees.

“So at a very high level, Mr. Chair, that is a quick synopsis of the discussion at the committee meeting.”

Meanwhile, as Perri discussed his concerns on the updated code of conduct policy statement, Hansen brought to attention the word ‘may’ in the first paragraph of the procedures and enforcement section.

“A trustee of the HWCDSB who has reasonable grounds to believe that a trustee of the board has breached the board’s code of conduct, may bring the alleged breach to the attention of the Chair of the board,” he said, reading from the code. The director noted that the use of the word ‘may’ does not preclude the trustee from speaking to the alleged offender.

Perri reiterated his case, saying he believes that the person who is being accused of a breach needs to be the first point of contact.

“The idea that they might be afraid of them, well they don’t have to do it in person, in fact, I think we should insist that it be written [in] an email so there’s a record of it.”

Daly responded.

“I think, Trustee Perri, the concern would be — and depending on the seriousness of the complaint — and the individual, say it was me … I would then have the ability to undermine the process even before they begin by speaking with other trustees or doing all kinds of things,” he said.

During the discussion, Perri introduced an amendment, but it was defeated and the document will go forward as planned.

Hamilton Catholic school trustees have lively discussion on update to trustee code of conduct

Community Mar 20, 2017 by Julia Lovett Flamborough Review

Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board trustee for Wards 3 and 4, Tony Perri, didn't mince words during the board's recent debate on the updating its Trustee Code of Conduct.

“That defies all the laws of natural justice that you should know who your accusers are,” he said, referring to the second paragraph in the Procedures and Enforcement section during the March committee of the whole meeting. The section states if an allegation of a breach of the code becomes apparent, a trustee must bring it to the chair or director’s notice first no later than six weeks after a trustee learned about it.

“If Trustee “A” has a problem with Trustee “B,” they shouldn’t be allowed to circumvent everybody else and go straight to the chair or the director. They should bring it to the attention of the trustee,” Perri said, noting that it would be a different thing altogether if they would be allowed to bring the issue up with both the chair of the board and the trustee.

Chair Pat Daly said that it isn’t a criminal law case and explained that in a criminal case, a person does not have to approach their accuser before going to the authorities.

“Say … in the event of extremes that one trustee was afraid of another because of whatever the allegation was, then that individual should be permitted to go to the chair and the director to advance that concern,” he said to Perri, who conceded the point, but added that in less extreme cases, the first step should be to approach the trustee.

This update comes from a January revised draft of Multi-Year Strategic Planning (MYSP): A Guide for School Board Trustees that the Ministry of Education revised to help board members and administration go in the right direction.

“This report and the supporting information and efforts gives a look at phase four: the implementing and monitoring multi-year- strategic plan is what was offered to the committee,” said Dave Hansen, director of education, of the policy review committee’s report.

The first three steps: getting organized, gathering information and developing the plan happened starting in 2015 and by December of 2018, the next MYSP will be preparing for development.

According to the report, the draft guide for responsibilities of the senior administration include “develop logic models for each goals, develop annual plans and align them with MYSP, develop budget, monitor process and report the board. ”

Meanwhile the report goes on to suggest the trustees are recommended to approve budgets, share MYSP with the community, monitor the progress, review the plan on an annual basis, review the director’s performance and communicate with the public on the progress.

“Essentially, this looks at the existing strategic plan, but gives it a framework and some structure on how we would be able monitor the implementation of the plan,” said Hansen.

According to the director, there were three recommendations that were brought to the committee. First, that the report be approved, second, that the “evaluation framework and simple logic model” be approved and finally, that they have time to book a professional development session for senior staff and all trustees.

“So at a very high level, Mr. Chair, that is a quick synopsis of the discussion at the committee meeting.”

Meanwhile, as Perri discussed his concerns on the updated code of conduct policy statement, Hansen brought to attention the word ‘may’ in the first paragraph of the procedures and enforcement section.

“A trustee of the HWCDSB who has reasonable grounds to believe that a trustee of the board has breached the board’s code of conduct, may bring the alleged breach to the attention of the Chair of the board,” he said, reading from the code. The director noted that the use of the word ‘may’ does not preclude the trustee from speaking to the alleged offender.

Perri reiterated his case, saying he believes that the person who is being accused of a breach needs to be the first point of contact.

“The idea that they might be afraid of them, well they don’t have to do it in person, in fact, I think we should insist that it be written [in] an email so there’s a record of it.”

Daly responded.

“I think, Trustee Perri, the concern would be — and depending on the seriousness of the complaint — and the individual, say it was me … I would then have the ability to undermine the process even before they begin by speaking with other trustees or doing all kinds of things,” he said.

During the discussion, Perri introduced an amendment, but it was defeated and the document will go forward as planned.

Hamilton Catholic school trustees have lively discussion on update to trustee code of conduct

Community Mar 20, 2017 by Julia Lovett Flamborough Review

Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board trustee for Wards 3 and 4, Tony Perri, didn't mince words during the board's recent debate on the updating its Trustee Code of Conduct.

“That defies all the laws of natural justice that you should know who your accusers are,” he said, referring to the second paragraph in the Procedures and Enforcement section during the March committee of the whole meeting. The section states if an allegation of a breach of the code becomes apparent, a trustee must bring it to the chair or director’s notice first no later than six weeks after a trustee learned about it.

“If Trustee “A” has a problem with Trustee “B,” they shouldn’t be allowed to circumvent everybody else and go straight to the chair or the director. They should bring it to the attention of the trustee,” Perri said, noting that it would be a different thing altogether if they would be allowed to bring the issue up with both the chair of the board and the trustee.

Chair Pat Daly said that it isn’t a criminal law case and explained that in a criminal case, a person does not have to approach their accuser before going to the authorities.

“Say … in the event of extremes that one trustee was afraid of another because of whatever the allegation was, then that individual should be permitted to go to the chair and the director to advance that concern,” he said to Perri, who conceded the point, but added that in less extreme cases, the first step should be to approach the trustee.

This update comes from a January revised draft of Multi-Year Strategic Planning (MYSP): A Guide for School Board Trustees that the Ministry of Education revised to help board members and administration go in the right direction.

“This report and the supporting information and efforts gives a look at phase four: the implementing and monitoring multi-year- strategic plan is what was offered to the committee,” said Dave Hansen, director of education, of the policy review committee’s report.

The first three steps: getting organized, gathering information and developing the plan happened starting in 2015 and by December of 2018, the next MYSP will be preparing for development.

According to the report, the draft guide for responsibilities of the senior administration include “develop logic models for each goals, develop annual plans and align them with MYSP, develop budget, monitor process and report the board. ”

Meanwhile the report goes on to suggest the trustees are recommended to approve budgets, share MYSP with the community, monitor the progress, review the plan on an annual basis, review the director’s performance and communicate with the public on the progress.

“Essentially, this looks at the existing strategic plan, but gives it a framework and some structure on how we would be able monitor the implementation of the plan,” said Hansen.

According to the director, there were three recommendations that were brought to the committee. First, that the report be approved, second, that the “evaluation framework and simple logic model” be approved and finally, that they have time to book a professional development session for senior staff and all trustees.

“So at a very high level, Mr. Chair, that is a quick synopsis of the discussion at the committee meeting.”

Meanwhile, as Perri discussed his concerns on the updated code of conduct policy statement, Hansen brought to attention the word ‘may’ in the first paragraph of the procedures and enforcement section.

“A trustee of the HWCDSB who has reasonable grounds to believe that a trustee of the board has breached the board’s code of conduct, may bring the alleged breach to the attention of the Chair of the board,” he said, reading from the code. The director noted that the use of the word ‘may’ does not preclude the trustee from speaking to the alleged offender.

Perri reiterated his case, saying he believes that the person who is being accused of a breach needs to be the first point of contact.

“The idea that they might be afraid of them, well they don’t have to do it in person, in fact, I think we should insist that it be written [in] an email so there’s a record of it.”

Daly responded.

“I think, Trustee Perri, the concern would be — and depending on the seriousness of the complaint — and the individual, say it was me … I would then have the ability to undermine the process even before they begin by speaking with other trustees or doing all kinds of things,” he said.

During the discussion, Perri introduced an amendment, but it was defeated and the document will go forward as planned.