Freelton native Ryan Ellis reflects on Stanley Cup run with Nashville Predators

Community Jul 05, 2017 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

After coming up short against the Pittsburgh Penguins in the Stanley Cup Finals, Ryan Ellis of the Nashville Predators said the team hopes to learn from the experience.

The Freelton native said the first three series of playoffs seem like a blur in retrospect.

”Our team as a whole had a blast – we learned a lot, not only about each other but what we can do as a team,” Ellis said at his June 29 charity golf tournament in Flamborough. “Although we didn’t go all the way, it’s the experiences in life you can learn from.

“Hopefully we can get back there, take what we’ve learned and apply it.”

In 22 playoff games, Ellis recorded five goals and eight assists, to go along with 12 penalty minutes. He added 16 goals and 22 assists in 71 regular season games.

The 26 year old said the Predators are a young team, which bodes well for next season.

“I think I’m our youngest D…and we’ve got some really young forwards,” he said. “The core is, for the most part, still intact.”

He noted teams like the Chicago Blackhawks and the Los Angeles Kings, that have had long periods of recent success and multiple Stanley Cup wins, were able to keep their core intact.

“I think that’s a key part of maintaining a chance of winning,” he said.

While the Predators dealt with injuries to several key players – including winger Kevin Fiala and centre Ryan Johansen – during the playoff run, Ellis said injuries are just part of the game.

“(You think about) what could have been if we had a completely healthy team,” he said. “But no team at that point of year is going to be completely healthy.

“We were fortunate in getting that far. It was a great experience and everything that happens, happens for a reason.

“We lived to fight another day; we’ll be back.”

Ellis never got to see the crowd outside Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, but said the vaunted Predators fans, and the experience of a playoff run in Nashville was special.

“A different celebrity singing the anthem every game, even when you go home after the game, seeing the amount of support,” he said. “Not only from the A-listers, but your regular, everyday fan coming down and supporting the team.

“Not only in the rink, but the thousands and thousands of people outside the rink – they had our backs the whole way there and that’s what made it more special – win or lose they were supporting us.”

He added when the team came up short against the Penguins, he received a lot of supportive messages from fans.

“People were still very happy for us and happy at the experience that they had.”

A veteran of six NHL seasons, Ellis noted in each of Nashville’s last three playoff runs the team has learned something different.

“The first one versus Chicago we didn’t really know how to win,” he said of the 2014-15 first round series, won in six games – including double- and triple-overtime games – by Chicago. “We learned something there.”

In 2015-16, the Predators defeated the Anaheim Ducks in seven games in the first round, before falling to the San Jose Sharks in seven games in the second round.

“We had a Game Seven, won a Game Seven and then lost a Game Seven,” he said. “So we felt what its like to not only win a series, but a do-or die game.”

Ellis said he thinks the Predators might have surprised themselves – as well as a lot of other people – this year by sweeping the Blackhawks in the first round.

“Once we swept Chicago there was never-ending belief in our team,” he said. “It was exciting.”

Ellis was a member of the Predators’ injured brigade and played through a knee injury throughout the playoffs.

He reiterated that injuries are part of the game.

“If you ask any athlete, there’s very few athletes that are going to tell you how hard it was to play,” he said. “No one’s going to miss the Stanley Cup playoffs.

“There’s a lot of guys, you could probably shoot them with a gun and they’d still be playing.”

The blueliner recently had surgery to repair a meniscus injury and is recovering.

“We’ll see what the doctor has to say,” he said of his recovery timeline. “It’s kind of in his hands.

“Laid up for the summer at least.”

While he hopes to be ready in time for training camp, Ellis said it’s up to his surgeon.

“We’ll more or less just take it as it goes,” he said.

Still, he said getting so close to hockey’s ultimate prize feeds his appetite for next season.

“You never want to regret anything and you look back on the games and what I could have done differently or what the team could have done differently,” he said. “But it just adds fuel to the fire going into next season.

“We were so good at home in the playoffs and it should feed our fire throughout the year to get home ice advantage throughout the playoffs.”

Freelton native Ryan Ellis reflects on Stanley Cup run with Nashville Predators

Community Jul 05, 2017 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

After coming up short against the Pittsburgh Penguins in the Stanley Cup Finals, Ryan Ellis of the Nashville Predators said the team hopes to learn from the experience.

The Freelton native said the first three series of playoffs seem like a blur in retrospect.

”Our team as a whole had a blast – we learned a lot, not only about each other but what we can do as a team,” Ellis said at his June 29 charity golf tournament in Flamborough. “Although we didn’t go all the way, it’s the experiences in life you can learn from.

“Hopefully we can get back there, take what we’ve learned and apply it.”

In 22 playoff games, Ellis recorded five goals and eight assists, to go along with 12 penalty minutes. He added 16 goals and 22 assists in 71 regular season games.

The 26 year old said the Predators are a young team, which bodes well for next season.

“I think I’m our youngest D…and we’ve got some really young forwards,” he said. “The core is, for the most part, still intact.”

He noted teams like the Chicago Blackhawks and the Los Angeles Kings, that have had long periods of recent success and multiple Stanley Cup wins, were able to keep their core intact.

“I think that’s a key part of maintaining a chance of winning,” he said.

While the Predators dealt with injuries to several key players – including winger Kevin Fiala and centre Ryan Johansen – during the playoff run, Ellis said injuries are just part of the game.

“(You think about) what could have been if we had a completely healthy team,” he said. “But no team at that point of year is going to be completely healthy.

“We were fortunate in getting that far. It was a great experience and everything that happens, happens for a reason.

“We lived to fight another day; we’ll be back.”

Ellis never got to see the crowd outside Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, but said the vaunted Predators fans, and the experience of a playoff run in Nashville was special.

“A different celebrity singing the anthem every game, even when you go home after the game, seeing the amount of support,” he said. “Not only from the A-listers, but your regular, everyday fan coming down and supporting the team.

“Not only in the rink, but the thousands and thousands of people outside the rink – they had our backs the whole way there and that’s what made it more special – win or lose they were supporting us.”

He added when the team came up short against the Penguins, he received a lot of supportive messages from fans.

“People were still very happy for us and happy at the experience that they had.”

A veteran of six NHL seasons, Ellis noted in each of Nashville’s last three playoff runs the team has learned something different.

“The first one versus Chicago we didn’t really know how to win,” he said of the 2014-15 first round series, won in six games – including double- and triple-overtime games – by Chicago. “We learned something there.”

In 2015-16, the Predators defeated the Anaheim Ducks in seven games in the first round, before falling to the San Jose Sharks in seven games in the second round.

“We had a Game Seven, won a Game Seven and then lost a Game Seven,” he said. “So we felt what its like to not only win a series, but a do-or die game.”

Ellis said he thinks the Predators might have surprised themselves – as well as a lot of other people – this year by sweeping the Blackhawks in the first round.

“Once we swept Chicago there was never-ending belief in our team,” he said. “It was exciting.”

Ellis was a member of the Predators’ injured brigade and played through a knee injury throughout the playoffs.

He reiterated that injuries are part of the game.

“If you ask any athlete, there’s very few athletes that are going to tell you how hard it was to play,” he said. “No one’s going to miss the Stanley Cup playoffs.

“There’s a lot of guys, you could probably shoot them with a gun and they’d still be playing.”

The blueliner recently had surgery to repair a meniscus injury and is recovering.

“We’ll see what the doctor has to say,” he said of his recovery timeline. “It’s kind of in his hands.

“Laid up for the summer at least.”

While he hopes to be ready in time for training camp, Ellis said it’s up to his surgeon.

“We’ll more or less just take it as it goes,” he said.

Still, he said getting so close to hockey’s ultimate prize feeds his appetite for next season.

“You never want to regret anything and you look back on the games and what I could have done differently or what the team could have done differently,” he said. “But it just adds fuel to the fire going into next season.

“We were so good at home in the playoffs and it should feed our fire throughout the year to get home ice advantage throughout the playoffs.”

Freelton native Ryan Ellis reflects on Stanley Cup run with Nashville Predators

Community Jul 05, 2017 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

After coming up short against the Pittsburgh Penguins in the Stanley Cup Finals, Ryan Ellis of the Nashville Predators said the team hopes to learn from the experience.

The Freelton native said the first three series of playoffs seem like a blur in retrospect.

”Our team as a whole had a blast – we learned a lot, not only about each other but what we can do as a team,” Ellis said at his June 29 charity golf tournament in Flamborough. “Although we didn’t go all the way, it’s the experiences in life you can learn from.

“Hopefully we can get back there, take what we’ve learned and apply it.”

In 22 playoff games, Ellis recorded five goals and eight assists, to go along with 12 penalty minutes. He added 16 goals and 22 assists in 71 regular season games.

The 26 year old said the Predators are a young team, which bodes well for next season.

“I think I’m our youngest D…and we’ve got some really young forwards,” he said. “The core is, for the most part, still intact.”

He noted teams like the Chicago Blackhawks and the Los Angeles Kings, that have had long periods of recent success and multiple Stanley Cup wins, were able to keep their core intact.

“I think that’s a key part of maintaining a chance of winning,” he said.

While the Predators dealt with injuries to several key players – including winger Kevin Fiala and centre Ryan Johansen – during the playoff run, Ellis said injuries are just part of the game.

“(You think about) what could have been if we had a completely healthy team,” he said. “But no team at that point of year is going to be completely healthy.

“We were fortunate in getting that far. It was a great experience and everything that happens, happens for a reason.

“We lived to fight another day; we’ll be back.”

Ellis never got to see the crowd outside Bridgestone Arena in Nashville, but said the vaunted Predators fans, and the experience of a playoff run in Nashville was special.

“A different celebrity singing the anthem every game, even when you go home after the game, seeing the amount of support,” he said. “Not only from the A-listers, but your regular, everyday fan coming down and supporting the team.

“Not only in the rink, but the thousands and thousands of people outside the rink – they had our backs the whole way there and that’s what made it more special – win or lose they were supporting us.”

He added when the team came up short against the Penguins, he received a lot of supportive messages from fans.

“People were still very happy for us and happy at the experience that they had.”

A veteran of six NHL seasons, Ellis noted in each of Nashville’s last three playoff runs the team has learned something different.

“The first one versus Chicago we didn’t really know how to win,” he said of the 2014-15 first round series, won in six games – including double- and triple-overtime games – by Chicago. “We learned something there.”

In 2015-16, the Predators defeated the Anaheim Ducks in seven games in the first round, before falling to the San Jose Sharks in seven games in the second round.

“We had a Game Seven, won a Game Seven and then lost a Game Seven,” he said. “So we felt what its like to not only win a series, but a do-or die game.”

Ellis said he thinks the Predators might have surprised themselves – as well as a lot of other people – this year by sweeping the Blackhawks in the first round.

“Once we swept Chicago there was never-ending belief in our team,” he said. “It was exciting.”

Ellis was a member of the Predators’ injured brigade and played through a knee injury throughout the playoffs.

He reiterated that injuries are part of the game.

“If you ask any athlete, there’s very few athletes that are going to tell you how hard it was to play,” he said. “No one’s going to miss the Stanley Cup playoffs.

“There’s a lot of guys, you could probably shoot them with a gun and they’d still be playing.”

The blueliner recently had surgery to repair a meniscus injury and is recovering.

“We’ll see what the doctor has to say,” he said of his recovery timeline. “It’s kind of in his hands.

“Laid up for the summer at least.”

While he hopes to be ready in time for training camp, Ellis said it’s up to his surgeon.

“We’ll more or less just take it as it goes,” he said.

Still, he said getting so close to hockey’s ultimate prize feeds his appetite for next season.

“You never want to regret anything and you look back on the games and what I could have done differently or what the team could have done differently,” he said. “But it just adds fuel to the fire going into next season.

“We were so good at home in the playoffs and it should feed our fire throughout the year to get home ice advantage throughout the playoffs.”