Waterdown medic committed to serving her country

Community Nov 14, 2017 by Julia Lovett Flamborough Review

From a young age, Waterdown's Carly Hiemstra knew serving her country was her life's mission.

“I had aspirations to be a pilot and fly helicopters and stuff like that but being a little sidetracked in life, I ended up being a medic,” said Hiemstra, a corporal and medic.

The one-time air cadet with the Dundas-based 735 Firebird Squadron explained that going from cadets into the military was a natural transition for her and since becoming a medic, she has never looked back.

“I was always active in lifeguarding and I was really interested in the medical field, especially when I got to high school,” she said.

Health sciences where among her classes and as she got older, Hiemstra said her focus shifted to search and rescue.

“Anything high speed — fun jobs that the military offered — and I found that medic was kind of a good starting point for me,” added Hiemstra.

At the moment, she works in a clinic from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. most days and works through a “sick parade” — a walk-in situation for service members.

“We see patients in the mornings and once they’re done and we’re done sick parade, generally we’ll … help out like the doctors and stuff like that with either minor procedures or help them out doing health assessments.”

In her four years as a medic, she has been able to continually train and challenge herself through professional development and qualifications. Over the past year, Hiemstra served in British Columbia to help combat the wildfires and just completed her qualification level 5 (QL5) in Ontario — the next step after QL3 — the initial qualification level after basic training.

Looking ahead, Hiemstra said her goals have changed but she wants to stay in the medical field and ultimately work as a pharmacy officer. In the meantime, she said she is focusing on doing her job well, while continuing to learn all she can about her craft.

“You’re always learning in the military, there’s never a day you don’t learn something new. I think the biggest thing that when I joined the military, I learned resilience, the ability to cope with a lot of either stress or just things changing all the time,” she said.

Hiemstra, currently serves with medical unit, 1 Field Ambulance. This year, the unit paired up with 15 Field Ambulance for their parade at a local cenotaph before heading to the legion to spend time with veterans.

“It’s really nice actually,” she said. “They’re always so grateful to talk to us and give their war stories and trade them.”

Hiemstra noted that when they talk to younger vets who have served in Afghanistan, there is an added sense of understanding and a bond.

“We have a really good time talking and getting experience from them and like understanding what they went through. I’m always surprised at how easily gets together and is able to chat,” she said.

Meanwhile Hiemstra also encourages people to join the military and serve in the medical unit.

“It’s a good trade, it’s the best trade out there. You can work in a plethora of different places," she said. "Just know that you’re not always going to be exactly where you want to be but if you work hard, you will get to where you want to be.”


Waterdown medic committed to serving her country

Community Nov 14, 2017 by Julia Lovett Flamborough Review

From a young age, Waterdown's Carly Hiemstra knew serving her country was her life's mission.

“I had aspirations to be a pilot and fly helicopters and stuff like that but being a little sidetracked in life, I ended up being a medic,” said Hiemstra, a corporal and medic.

The one-time air cadet with the Dundas-based 735 Firebird Squadron explained that going from cadets into the military was a natural transition for her and since becoming a medic, she has never looked back.

“I was always active in lifeguarding and I was really interested in the medical field, especially when I got to high school,” she said.

Health sciences where among her classes and as she got older, Hiemstra said her focus shifted to search and rescue.

“Anything high speed — fun jobs that the military offered — and I found that medic was kind of a good starting point for me,” added Hiemstra.

At the moment, she works in a clinic from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. most days and works through a “sick parade” — a walk-in situation for service members.

“We see patients in the mornings and once they’re done and we’re done sick parade, generally we’ll … help out like the doctors and stuff like that with either minor procedures or help them out doing health assessments.”

In her four years as a medic, she has been able to continually train and challenge herself through professional development and qualifications. Over the past year, Hiemstra served in British Columbia to help combat the wildfires and just completed her qualification level 5 (QL5) in Ontario — the next step after QL3 — the initial qualification level after basic training.

Looking ahead, Hiemstra said her goals have changed but she wants to stay in the medical field and ultimately work as a pharmacy officer. In the meantime, she said she is focusing on doing her job well, while continuing to learn all she can about her craft.

“You’re always learning in the military, there’s never a day you don’t learn something new. I think the biggest thing that when I joined the military, I learned resilience, the ability to cope with a lot of either stress or just things changing all the time,” she said.

Hiemstra, currently serves with medical unit, 1 Field Ambulance. This year, the unit paired up with 15 Field Ambulance for their parade at a local cenotaph before heading to the legion to spend time with veterans.

“It’s really nice actually,” she said. “They’re always so grateful to talk to us and give their war stories and trade them.”

Hiemstra noted that when they talk to younger vets who have served in Afghanistan, there is an added sense of understanding and a bond.

“We have a really good time talking and getting experience from them and like understanding what they went through. I’m always surprised at how easily gets together and is able to chat,” she said.

Meanwhile Hiemstra also encourages people to join the military and serve in the medical unit.

“It’s a good trade, it’s the best trade out there. You can work in a plethora of different places," she said. "Just know that you’re not always going to be exactly where you want to be but if you work hard, you will get to where you want to be.”


Waterdown medic committed to serving her country

Community Nov 14, 2017 by Julia Lovett Flamborough Review

From a young age, Waterdown's Carly Hiemstra knew serving her country was her life's mission.

“I had aspirations to be a pilot and fly helicopters and stuff like that but being a little sidetracked in life, I ended up being a medic,” said Hiemstra, a corporal and medic.

The one-time air cadet with the Dundas-based 735 Firebird Squadron explained that going from cadets into the military was a natural transition for her and since becoming a medic, she has never looked back.

“I was always active in lifeguarding and I was really interested in the medical field, especially when I got to high school,” she said.

Health sciences where among her classes and as she got older, Hiemstra said her focus shifted to search and rescue.

“Anything high speed — fun jobs that the military offered — and I found that medic was kind of a good starting point for me,” added Hiemstra.

At the moment, she works in a clinic from 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. most days and works through a “sick parade” — a walk-in situation for service members.

“We see patients in the mornings and once they’re done and we’re done sick parade, generally we’ll … help out like the doctors and stuff like that with either minor procedures or help them out doing health assessments.”

In her four years as a medic, she has been able to continually train and challenge herself through professional development and qualifications. Over the past year, Hiemstra served in British Columbia to help combat the wildfires and just completed her qualification level 5 (QL5) in Ontario — the next step after QL3 — the initial qualification level after basic training.

Looking ahead, Hiemstra said her goals have changed but she wants to stay in the medical field and ultimately work as a pharmacy officer. In the meantime, she said she is focusing on doing her job well, while continuing to learn all she can about her craft.

“You’re always learning in the military, there’s never a day you don’t learn something new. I think the biggest thing that when I joined the military, I learned resilience, the ability to cope with a lot of either stress or just things changing all the time,” she said.

Hiemstra, currently serves with medical unit, 1 Field Ambulance. This year, the unit paired up with 15 Field Ambulance for their parade at a local cenotaph before heading to the legion to spend time with veterans.

“It’s really nice actually,” she said. “They’re always so grateful to talk to us and give their war stories and trade them.”

Hiemstra noted that when they talk to younger vets who have served in Afghanistan, there is an added sense of understanding and a bond.

“We have a really good time talking and getting experience from them and like understanding what they went through. I’m always surprised at how easily gets together and is able to chat,” she said.

Meanwhile Hiemstra also encourages people to join the military and serve in the medical unit.

“It’s a good trade, it’s the best trade out there. You can work in a plethora of different places," she said. "Just know that you’re not always going to be exactly where you want to be but if you work hard, you will get to where you want to be.”