Lynden Spring Revue showcase celebrates 25th show in 50 years

Community Mar 09, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

For Bill Osborne of the Lynden Spring Revue biennial community showcase of song, music, dance and entertainment, there’s no big secret to the event lasting 50 years and 25 productions.

“It’s not complex,” Osborne said. “Fun! Fun for us and fun for the audience.”

The 50th year is marked with the 25th production this fall at Lynden United Church and features at least 100 cast and crew including a 50-person chorus. More than two dozen Dundas and Ancaster residents are among the group. The Spring Revue also supports local arts students with annual scholarships to six area schools. Revue music director Roger Girard taught at Parkside for 10 years, Ancaster High for eight years and part time at Highland for two years.

This year’s show REWIND features songs and skits chosen from the past 50 years.

“That gives us a lot to choose from,” Osborne said. “We are including characters from past shows.”

Among the returning performances are: The White Rabbit and Tweedledum & Tweedledee from 2012’s So You … Dance, Alice, Hula dancer from the 1980 production Up Up and Away, and a Flapper from the very first show, The Good Old Days, in 1970.

That first show was presented by the Lynden United Church Centennial Choir and billed as “One Hundred Years of Dance and Song.”

Bette Norton, the director of that first revue, died in 2016 and the organization later set up a student scholarship program in her name — providing financial support every year to students, who contribute significantly to the musical life of their school or community, at Ancaster High, Dundas Valley Secondary School and Ancaster Public School, as well as Lee Academy, Dr. John Seaton Elementary and Beverly Central Elementary.

“She did a lot to promote community togetherness through music,” Osborne said of Norton. “The show is a nice legacy.”

Retired Dundas family doctor Bob James has performed in the bass section of the Lynden Spring Revue choir five times, since the 2010 show, and makes his sixth appearance in this year’s anniversary revue.

James said it’s a fun event that has plenty of community support. He joked that if there are 400 people in Lynden, about 200 are on stage and 200 in the audience for the spring revue.

“The nice thing is it’s really busy getting ready from January to April, then you have a year off, “ James said, noting the revue has been presented every other year since 1970 — so there is a break for performers.

There’s behind-the-scenes preparation in the off years, but the performers get some time off.

“We had a couple of rehearsals in November and December, then in mid-January it started every week,” James said. “It’s fairly high-energy, high-commitment for four months.”

Osborne said organizers have to “keep reminding folks we are still here working hard and putting on a great show.”

For more information on the Lynden Spring Revue visit its website at www.lyndenspringrevue.com

 

Lynden Spring Revue showcase celebrates 25th show in 50 years

Community Mar 09, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

For Bill Osborne of the Lynden Spring Revue biennial community showcase of song, music, dance and entertainment, there’s no big secret to the event lasting 50 years and 25 productions.

“It’s not complex,” Osborne said. “Fun! Fun for us and fun for the audience.”

The 50th year is marked with the 25th production this fall at Lynden United Church and features at least 100 cast and crew including a 50-person chorus. More than two dozen Dundas and Ancaster residents are among the group. The Spring Revue also supports local arts students with annual scholarships to six area schools. Revue music director Roger Girard taught at Parkside for 10 years, Ancaster High for eight years and part time at Highland for two years.

This year’s show REWIND features songs and skits chosen from the past 50 years.

“That gives us a lot to choose from,” Osborne said. “We are including characters from past shows.”

Among the returning performances are: The White Rabbit and Tweedledum & Tweedledee from 2012’s So You … Dance, Alice, Hula dancer from the 1980 production Up Up and Away, and a Flapper from the very first show, The Good Old Days, in 1970.

That first show was presented by the Lynden United Church Centennial Choir and billed as “One Hundred Years of Dance and Song.”

Bette Norton, the director of that first revue, died in 2016 and the organization later set up a student scholarship program in her name — providing financial support every year to students, who contribute significantly to the musical life of their school or community, at Ancaster High, Dundas Valley Secondary School and Ancaster Public School, as well as Lee Academy, Dr. John Seaton Elementary and Beverly Central Elementary.

“She did a lot to promote community togetherness through music,” Osborne said of Norton. “The show is a nice legacy.”

Retired Dundas family doctor Bob James has performed in the bass section of the Lynden Spring Revue choir five times, since the 2010 show, and makes his sixth appearance in this year’s anniversary revue.

James said it’s a fun event that has plenty of community support. He joked that if there are 400 people in Lynden, about 200 are on stage and 200 in the audience for the spring revue.

“The nice thing is it’s really busy getting ready from January to April, then you have a year off, “ James said, noting the revue has been presented every other year since 1970 — so there is a break for performers.

There’s behind-the-scenes preparation in the off years, but the performers get some time off.

“We had a couple of rehearsals in November and December, then in mid-January it started every week,” James said. “It’s fairly high-energy, high-commitment for four months.”

Osborne said organizers have to “keep reminding folks we are still here working hard and putting on a great show.”

For more information on the Lynden Spring Revue visit its website at www.lyndenspringrevue.com

 

Lynden Spring Revue showcase celebrates 25th show in 50 years

Community Mar 09, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

For Bill Osborne of the Lynden Spring Revue biennial community showcase of song, music, dance and entertainment, there’s no big secret to the event lasting 50 years and 25 productions.

“It’s not complex,” Osborne said. “Fun! Fun for us and fun for the audience.”

The 50th year is marked with the 25th production this fall at Lynden United Church and features at least 100 cast and crew including a 50-person chorus. More than two dozen Dundas and Ancaster residents are among the group. The Spring Revue also supports local arts students with annual scholarships to six area schools. Revue music director Roger Girard taught at Parkside for 10 years, Ancaster High for eight years and part time at Highland for two years.

This year’s show REWIND features songs and skits chosen from the past 50 years.

“That gives us a lot to choose from,” Osborne said. “We are including characters from past shows.”

Among the returning performances are: The White Rabbit and Tweedledum & Tweedledee from 2012’s So You … Dance, Alice, Hula dancer from the 1980 production Up Up and Away, and a Flapper from the very first show, The Good Old Days, in 1970.

That first show was presented by the Lynden United Church Centennial Choir and billed as “One Hundred Years of Dance and Song.”

Bette Norton, the director of that first revue, died in 2016 and the organization later set up a student scholarship program in her name — providing financial support every year to students, who contribute significantly to the musical life of their school or community, at Ancaster High, Dundas Valley Secondary School and Ancaster Public School, as well as Lee Academy, Dr. John Seaton Elementary and Beverly Central Elementary.

“She did a lot to promote community togetherness through music,” Osborne said of Norton. “The show is a nice legacy.”

Retired Dundas family doctor Bob James has performed in the bass section of the Lynden Spring Revue choir five times, since the 2010 show, and makes his sixth appearance in this year’s anniversary revue.

James said it’s a fun event that has plenty of community support. He joked that if there are 400 people in Lynden, about 200 are on stage and 200 in the audience for the spring revue.

“The nice thing is it’s really busy getting ready from January to April, then you have a year off, “ James said, noting the revue has been presented every other year since 1970 — so there is a break for performers.

There’s behind-the-scenes preparation in the off years, but the performers get some time off.

“We had a couple of rehearsals in November and December, then in mid-January it started every week,” James said. “It’s fairly high-energy, high-commitment for four months.”

Osborne said organizers have to “keep reminding folks we are still here working hard and putting on a great show.”

For more information on the Lynden Spring Revue visit its website at www.lyndenspringrevue.com