'Made it real': Lynden runner completes virtual Boston Marathon Sept. 5

News Sep 15, 2020 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Despite COVID-19, Lynden runner Lorraine Gavloski’s quest to run 50 marathons before age 50 remains on track.

The 47-year-old marathon runner ran a virtual Boston Marathon — her third Boston Marathon — on Sept. 5 in Lynden, after this year’s Boston Marathon — originally slated for April — was cancelled by the ongoing pandemic.

Gavloski, who qualified for the Boston event at the Buffalo Marathon in May 2019, originally wasn’t sold on the idea of a virtual marathon.

“At first, I wasn’t actually sure that I even wanted to run it as a virtual marathon,” she said. “It didn’t seem that real to me.

“But eventually I warmed up to the idea of it.”

Gavloski, who works in customer marketing for SC Johnson in Brantford, said before COVID-19, she didn’t run in Lynden at all. But when the pandemic hit, the trails that constituted her regular running routes closed down, so she began running in the village.

The way she was received made her want to run the virtual marathon there, as well.

“I started going into town to run and everyone was so nice and friendly and welcoming to me,” she said. “The morning walkers would all talk to me, so I thought, ‘This is kind of a nice little tribute to bring to the town.

Gavloski, who has run 43 marathons and 50 races of marathon distance or longer, has a personal best of 3:39.36 over the 42-kilometre distance. She ran her virtual marathon in a time of 4:20.28.

Going into the run, Gavloski said she thought it would be mentally tough to run the virtual marathon, but she said the number of friends gathered at the Lynden library to cheer her on really helped.

“I started at 7 a.m. and I had somebody out there to see me off,” she said. “It actually was not that tough, because on my three-km loop, I would run by somebody every kilometre and a half.

“I was running by my friends — they were out there with cowbells on; I had one friend that was dressed as Minnie Mouse.”

Gavloski said her friends even created a makeshift finish line out of paper towel that she broke when she crossed the finish line.

“It was such a fun day,” she said. “It got a little tough around 30-35 kilometres, a little draining.

“But after 35 km, I knew the finish was not too far away and I kept going by my friends, which made it wonderful.”

Gavloski ran down Howard Street to Governors Road, before turning around and running back down Howard and out Barnabas Street.

“There’s a bit of symbolism there,” she said of the three-kilometre loop. “It created an L-shape for my name, Lorraine, and it’s also a three-kilometre stretch and three is my favourite number.”

Gavloski, who ran her first marathon in Toronto more than a decade ago, said her biggest takeaway from the virtual event is how much people can make the race enjoyable.

“I’m trying to do 50 marathons before I turn 50 and I wasn’t going to count this as one of those marathons, because I didn’t feel like it was that real,” she said. “But the experience I had out there with my friends cheering me on — the people really turned it into a real race for me — so I am counting it.

“The people were what made it real.”

'Made it real': Lynden runner completes virtual Boston Marathon Sept. 5

Lorraine Gavloski aiming to run 50 marathons before age 50

News Sep 15, 2020 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Despite COVID-19, Lynden runner Lorraine Gavloski’s quest to run 50 marathons before age 50 remains on track.

The 47-year-old marathon runner ran a virtual Boston Marathon — her third Boston Marathon — on Sept. 5 in Lynden, after this year’s Boston Marathon — originally slated for April — was cancelled by the ongoing pandemic.

Gavloski, who qualified for the Boston event at the Buffalo Marathon in May 2019, originally wasn’t sold on the idea of a virtual marathon.

“At first, I wasn’t actually sure that I even wanted to run it as a virtual marathon,” she said. “It didn’t seem that real to me.

“But the experience I had out there with my friends cheering me on — the people really turned it into a real race for me — so I am counting it." — Lorraine Gavloski

“But eventually I warmed up to the idea of it.”

Gavloski, who works in customer marketing for SC Johnson in Brantford, said before COVID-19, she didn’t run in Lynden at all. But when the pandemic hit, the trails that constituted her regular running routes closed down, so she began running in the village.

The way she was received made her want to run the virtual marathon there, as well.

“I started going into town to run and everyone was so nice and friendly and welcoming to me,” she said. “The morning walkers would all talk to me, so I thought, ‘This is kind of a nice little tribute to bring to the town.

Gavloski, who has run 43 marathons and 50 races of marathon distance or longer, has a personal best of 3:39.36 over the 42-kilometre distance. She ran her virtual marathon in a time of 4:20.28.

Going into the run, Gavloski said she thought it would be mentally tough to run the virtual marathon, but she said the number of friends gathered at the Lynden library to cheer her on really helped.

“I started at 7 a.m. and I had somebody out there to see me off,” she said. “It actually was not that tough, because on my three-km loop, I would run by somebody every kilometre and a half.

“I was running by my friends — they were out there with cowbells on; I had one friend that was dressed as Minnie Mouse.”

Gavloski said her friends even created a makeshift finish line out of paper towel that she broke when she crossed the finish line.

“It was such a fun day,” she said. “It got a little tough around 30-35 kilometres, a little draining.

“But after 35 km, I knew the finish was not too far away and I kept going by my friends, which made it wonderful.”

Gavloski ran down Howard Street to Governors Road, before turning around and running back down Howard and out Barnabas Street.

“There’s a bit of symbolism there,” she said of the three-kilometre loop. “It created an L-shape for my name, Lorraine, and it’s also a three-kilometre stretch and three is my favourite number.”

Gavloski, who ran her first marathon in Toronto more than a decade ago, said her biggest takeaway from the virtual event is how much people can make the race enjoyable.

“I’m trying to do 50 marathons before I turn 50 and I wasn’t going to count this as one of those marathons, because I didn’t feel like it was that real,” she said. “But the experience I had out there with my friends cheering me on — the people really turned it into a real race for me — so I am counting it.

“The people were what made it real.”

'Made it real': Lynden runner completes virtual Boston Marathon Sept. 5

Lorraine Gavloski aiming to run 50 marathons before age 50

News Sep 15, 2020 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Despite COVID-19, Lynden runner Lorraine Gavloski’s quest to run 50 marathons before age 50 remains on track.

The 47-year-old marathon runner ran a virtual Boston Marathon — her third Boston Marathon — on Sept. 5 in Lynden, after this year’s Boston Marathon — originally slated for April — was cancelled by the ongoing pandemic.

Gavloski, who qualified for the Boston event at the Buffalo Marathon in May 2019, originally wasn’t sold on the idea of a virtual marathon.

“At first, I wasn’t actually sure that I even wanted to run it as a virtual marathon,” she said. “It didn’t seem that real to me.

“But the experience I had out there with my friends cheering me on — the people really turned it into a real race for me — so I am counting it." — Lorraine Gavloski

“But eventually I warmed up to the idea of it.”

Gavloski, who works in customer marketing for SC Johnson in Brantford, said before COVID-19, she didn’t run in Lynden at all. But when the pandemic hit, the trails that constituted her regular running routes closed down, so she began running in the village.

The way she was received made her want to run the virtual marathon there, as well.

“I started going into town to run and everyone was so nice and friendly and welcoming to me,” she said. “The morning walkers would all talk to me, so I thought, ‘This is kind of a nice little tribute to bring to the town.

Gavloski, who has run 43 marathons and 50 races of marathon distance or longer, has a personal best of 3:39.36 over the 42-kilometre distance. She ran her virtual marathon in a time of 4:20.28.

Going into the run, Gavloski said she thought it would be mentally tough to run the virtual marathon, but she said the number of friends gathered at the Lynden library to cheer her on really helped.

“I started at 7 a.m. and I had somebody out there to see me off,” she said. “It actually was not that tough, because on my three-km loop, I would run by somebody every kilometre and a half.

“I was running by my friends — they were out there with cowbells on; I had one friend that was dressed as Minnie Mouse.”

Gavloski said her friends even created a makeshift finish line out of paper towel that she broke when she crossed the finish line.

“It was such a fun day,” she said. “It got a little tough around 30-35 kilometres, a little draining.

“But after 35 km, I knew the finish was not too far away and I kept going by my friends, which made it wonderful.”

Gavloski ran down Howard Street to Governors Road, before turning around and running back down Howard and out Barnabas Street.

“There’s a bit of symbolism there,” she said of the three-kilometre loop. “It created an L-shape for my name, Lorraine, and it’s also a three-kilometre stretch and three is my favourite number.”

Gavloski, who ran her first marathon in Toronto more than a decade ago, said her biggest takeaway from the virtual event is how much people can make the race enjoyable.

“I’m trying to do 50 marathons before I turn 50 and I wasn’t going to count this as one of those marathons, because I didn’t feel like it was that real,” she said. “But the experience I had out there with my friends cheering me on — the people really turned it into a real race for me — so I am counting it.

“The people were what made it real.”