Hamilton bullying review hosting final two public sessions online

News Sep 13, 2020 Hamilton Spectator

The final two of 15 community sessions hosted by an expert panel studying how to prevent bullying at Hamilton public schools are set to proceed online after planned meetings in late March were postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak.

A session for the Waterdown community is scheduled for Sept. 22, with one for the racialized community on Sept. 29. Both start at 6 p.m.

Participation will be via Zoom and limited to 100 people for each session, with registration via Eventbrite at bit.ly/safeschoolsreview closing 48 hours beforehand.

Trustees initiated the review in response to the public outcry over the stabbing death of 14-year-old student Devan Selvey outside Sir Winston Churchill last October.

It’s led by Dr. Jean Clinton, a clinical professor in child psychiatry at McMaster University, Brenda Flaherty, a Mac assistant nursing professor and former Hamilton Health Sciences executive officer, and Gary Warner, a retired Mac prof with an extensive background in social justice issues.

The Waterdown meeting is the last of five scheduled high school sessions, with ones at MacNab, Westdale, Bernie Custis and Saltfleet completed as scheduled in February and early March.

“We remain committed to providing feedback and recommendations on how to prevent, intervene, respond to and report bullying thanks to the valuable input provided by participants across our community,” Clinton said in a notice on the board’s website.

The panel submitted an interim report to trustees on May 25 that highlighted key themes from sessions to date, but got approval to delay a final report, initially due in September, until December because of the pandemic.

The public will still get another chance for input through a postponed April online survey now scheduled for October.

The notice for the Waterdown and racialized sessions states that registrants will receive a secure Zoom link the day before and that the second half of the meetings will be broken into smaller Zoom rooms.

“To ensure the Review Panel accurately documents contributions to conversations, sessions will be recorded for the purposes of reviewing later and creating detailed notes,” it states.

“Once note-taking is complete, recordings will be destroyed and will not be used for any other purpose. Participants will also not be identified in the notes.”

Members of the media will be able to observe the sessions, but are being asked not to record or photograph proceedings.

All previous in-person public sessions were open to the media without restrictions.

Hamilton bullying review hosting final two public sessions online

A session for the Waterdown community is scheduled for Sept. 22, with one for the racialized community on Sept. 29. Both start at 6 p.m.

News Sep 13, 2020 Hamilton Spectator

The final two of 15 community sessions hosted by an expert panel studying how to prevent bullying at Hamilton public schools are set to proceed online after planned meetings in late March were postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak.

A session for the Waterdown community is scheduled for Sept. 22, with one for the racialized community on Sept. 29. Both start at 6 p.m.

Participation will be via Zoom and limited to 100 people for each session, with registration via Eventbrite at bit.ly/safeschoolsreview closing 48 hours beforehand.

Trustees initiated the review in response to the public outcry over the stabbing death of 14-year-old student Devan Selvey outside Sir Winston Churchill last October.

Related Content

It’s led by Dr. Jean Clinton, a clinical professor in child psychiatry at McMaster University, Brenda Flaherty, a Mac assistant nursing professor and former Hamilton Health Sciences executive officer, and Gary Warner, a retired Mac prof with an extensive background in social justice issues.

The Waterdown meeting is the last of five scheduled high school sessions, with ones at MacNab, Westdale, Bernie Custis and Saltfleet completed as scheduled in February and early March.

“We remain committed to providing feedback and recommendations on how to prevent, intervene, respond to and report bullying thanks to the valuable input provided by participants across our community,” Clinton said in a notice on the board’s website.

The panel submitted an interim report to trustees on May 25 that highlighted key themes from sessions to date, but got approval to delay a final report, initially due in September, until December because of the pandemic.

The public will still get another chance for input through a postponed April online survey now scheduled for October.

The notice for the Waterdown and racialized sessions states that registrants will receive a secure Zoom link the day before and that the second half of the meetings will be broken into smaller Zoom rooms.

“To ensure the Review Panel accurately documents contributions to conversations, sessions will be recorded for the purposes of reviewing later and creating detailed notes,” it states.

“Once note-taking is complete, recordings will be destroyed and will not be used for any other purpose. Participants will also not be identified in the notes.”

Members of the media will be able to observe the sessions, but are being asked not to record or photograph proceedings.

All previous in-person public sessions were open to the media without restrictions.

Hamilton bullying review hosting final two public sessions online

A session for the Waterdown community is scheduled for Sept. 22, with one for the racialized community on Sept. 29. Both start at 6 p.m.

News Sep 13, 2020 Hamilton Spectator

The final two of 15 community sessions hosted by an expert panel studying how to prevent bullying at Hamilton public schools are set to proceed online after planned meetings in late March were postponed due to the coronavirus outbreak.

A session for the Waterdown community is scheduled for Sept. 22, with one for the racialized community on Sept. 29. Both start at 6 p.m.

Participation will be via Zoom and limited to 100 people for each session, with registration via Eventbrite at bit.ly/safeschoolsreview closing 48 hours beforehand.

Trustees initiated the review in response to the public outcry over the stabbing death of 14-year-old student Devan Selvey outside Sir Winston Churchill last October.

Related Content

It’s led by Dr. Jean Clinton, a clinical professor in child psychiatry at McMaster University, Brenda Flaherty, a Mac assistant nursing professor and former Hamilton Health Sciences executive officer, and Gary Warner, a retired Mac prof with an extensive background in social justice issues.

The Waterdown meeting is the last of five scheduled high school sessions, with ones at MacNab, Westdale, Bernie Custis and Saltfleet completed as scheduled in February and early March.

“We remain committed to providing feedback and recommendations on how to prevent, intervene, respond to and report bullying thanks to the valuable input provided by participants across our community,” Clinton said in a notice on the board’s website.

The panel submitted an interim report to trustees on May 25 that highlighted key themes from sessions to date, but got approval to delay a final report, initially due in September, until December because of the pandemic.

The public will still get another chance for input through a postponed April online survey now scheduled for October.

The notice for the Waterdown and racialized sessions states that registrants will receive a secure Zoom link the day before and that the second half of the meetings will be broken into smaller Zoom rooms.

“To ensure the Review Panel accurately documents contributions to conversations, sessions will be recorded for the purposes of reviewing later and creating detailed notes,” it states.

“Once note-taking is complete, recordings will be destroyed and will not be used for any other purpose. Participants will also not be identified in the notes.”

Members of the media will be able to observe the sessions, but are being asked not to record or photograph proceedings.

All previous in-person public sessions were open to the media without restrictions.