Flamborough-Glanbrook candidates square off in Cable 14 debate

News Sep 08, 2021 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Four candidates vying for the Flamborough-Glanbrook seat took part in a debate hosted by Cable 14 on Sept. 7.

Green candidate Tom Hatch, Conservative Dan Muys, NDP candidate Lorne Newick and Liberal Vito Sgro fielded questions from a panel of reporters and other representatives before posing questions to one another during the event hosted at the Westdale Theatre. People’s Party of Canada candidate Bill Panchyshyn was not invited to take part, with host Mike Fortune noting organizers took their cue from the federal Leaders’ Debates Commission, which will not include PPC leader Maxime Bernier.

RELATED – QUOTABLE: Top moments from the Flamborough-Glanbrook debate

While the majority of questions were directed to the Liberal and Conservative candidates, with Sgro and Muys citing their parties’ record and platform, respectively, all four candidates agreed improved rural broadband internet access is a priority.

Muys, who posed the question to the other candidates, said reliable rural internet is a huge issue in Flamborough-Glanbrook and is something that “just needs to be fixed.”

“I talked to a mother in Flamborough who had to drive to Tim Hortons to connect to Wi-Fi to get their kid on to online schooling,” he said. “These days, particularly after the pandemic — whether it’s school or work or life or church, you need to have access to high-speed internet.

“There has been a lot of talk but not a lot of action on that over the course of the last number of years.”

Muys said the Conservative Party is proposing to invest in rural broadband over the course of the next four years.

“And that’s not soon enough,” he said. “I hope that other parties will join us in doing the same.”

Sgro said it is “beyond ridiculous” that Flamborough-Glanbrook doesn’t have proper internet, adding the Liberal platform states that if those companies who have bought the rights to broadband for specific areas don’t have the service in place by 2025, they will lose the right to it and it will be sold to someone who will install the service.

“We’ve been waiting much, much too long … in many parts of Flamborough-Glanbrook, and we have to get it there,” he said. “If they don’t put it in by 2025, they lose it.

“We’re going to be very strict on that.”

For his part, Newick agreed that broadband internet has to be expanded into the rural areas of the riding.

“It creates a real problem for families when they don’t have access to what is basically — it should be deemed an essential service,” he said. “It has become such a big part of our lives and what we do day-to-day.

“I 100-per-cent support expanding and investing in overall better service.”

Meanwhile, Hatch, who has five young children, said with online schooling it is “absolutely paramount” that students are able to connect to reliable internet to complete their school work. However, he said the issue connects to mental health as services such as Zoom broke down barriers of isolation many people were experiencing.

“The pandemic and unreliable internet has exacerbated those feelings in those people in more areas of isolation,” he said. “Yes, we have a rural riding … but there’s no excuse for that. No person in this day and age should be cut off from the world because their internet is not reliable.

“2025 is too long to wait.”

Other questions posed at the Cable 14 debate included asking Muys what voters should make of Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s flip-flop on gun control, investment in skilled trades and if he supports lockdowns. Sgro was grilled on infrastructure investments in the riding and how a Liberal government would deal with urban sprawl. Both candidates were asked about their position on Hamilton’s proposed LRT.

Newick was asked about ensuring workers are paid fair wages in federal labour relations, and Hatch answered why voters should choose the Green party, with the party dealing with publicized infighting at the leadership level.

Flamborough-Glanbrook candidates square off in Cable 14 debate

All candidates agree broadband needs to be improved

News Sep 08, 2021 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Four candidates vying for the Flamborough-Glanbrook seat took part in a debate hosted by Cable 14 on Sept. 7.

Green candidate Tom Hatch, Conservative Dan Muys, NDP candidate Lorne Newick and Liberal Vito Sgro fielded questions from a panel of reporters and other representatives before posing questions to one another during the event hosted at the Westdale Theatre. People’s Party of Canada candidate Bill Panchyshyn was not invited to take part, with host Mike Fortune noting organizers took their cue from the federal Leaders’ Debates Commission, which will not include PPC leader Maxime Bernier.

RELATED – QUOTABLE: Top moments from the Flamborough-Glanbrook debate

While the majority of questions were directed to the Liberal and Conservative candidates, with Sgro and Muys citing their parties’ record and platform, respectively, all four candidates agreed improved rural broadband internet access is a priority.

Related Content

Muys, who posed the question to the other candidates, said reliable rural internet is a huge issue in Flamborough-Glanbrook and is something that “just needs to be fixed.”

“I talked to a mother in Flamborough who had to drive to Tim Hortons to connect to Wi-Fi to get their kid on to online schooling,” he said. “These days, particularly after the pandemic — whether it’s school or work or life or church, you need to have access to high-speed internet.

“There has been a lot of talk but not a lot of action on that over the course of the last number of years.”

Muys said the Conservative Party is proposing to invest in rural broadband over the course of the next four years.

“And that’s not soon enough,” he said. “I hope that other parties will join us in doing the same.”

Sgro said it is “beyond ridiculous” that Flamborough-Glanbrook doesn’t have proper internet, adding the Liberal platform states that if those companies who have bought the rights to broadband for specific areas don’t have the service in place by 2025, they will lose the right to it and it will be sold to someone who will install the service.

“We’ve been waiting much, much too long … in many parts of Flamborough-Glanbrook, and we have to get it there,” he said. “If they don’t put it in by 2025, they lose it.

“We’re going to be very strict on that.”

For his part, Newick agreed that broadband internet has to be expanded into the rural areas of the riding.

“It creates a real problem for families when they don’t have access to what is basically — it should be deemed an essential service,” he said. “It has become such a big part of our lives and what we do day-to-day.

“I 100-per-cent support expanding and investing in overall better service.”

Meanwhile, Hatch, who has five young children, said with online schooling it is “absolutely paramount” that students are able to connect to reliable internet to complete their school work. However, he said the issue connects to mental health as services such as Zoom broke down barriers of isolation many people were experiencing.

“The pandemic and unreliable internet has exacerbated those feelings in those people in more areas of isolation,” he said. “Yes, we have a rural riding … but there’s no excuse for that. No person in this day and age should be cut off from the world because their internet is not reliable.

“2025 is too long to wait.”

Other questions posed at the Cable 14 debate included asking Muys what voters should make of Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s flip-flop on gun control, investment in skilled trades and if he supports lockdowns. Sgro was grilled on infrastructure investments in the riding and how a Liberal government would deal with urban sprawl. Both candidates were asked about their position on Hamilton’s proposed LRT.

Newick was asked about ensuring workers are paid fair wages in federal labour relations, and Hatch answered why voters should choose the Green party, with the party dealing with publicized infighting at the leadership level.

Flamborough-Glanbrook candidates square off in Cable 14 debate

All candidates agree broadband needs to be improved

News Sep 08, 2021 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Four candidates vying for the Flamborough-Glanbrook seat took part in a debate hosted by Cable 14 on Sept. 7.

Green candidate Tom Hatch, Conservative Dan Muys, NDP candidate Lorne Newick and Liberal Vito Sgro fielded questions from a panel of reporters and other representatives before posing questions to one another during the event hosted at the Westdale Theatre. People’s Party of Canada candidate Bill Panchyshyn was not invited to take part, with host Mike Fortune noting organizers took their cue from the federal Leaders’ Debates Commission, which will not include PPC leader Maxime Bernier.

RELATED – QUOTABLE: Top moments from the Flamborough-Glanbrook debate

While the majority of questions were directed to the Liberal and Conservative candidates, with Sgro and Muys citing their parties’ record and platform, respectively, all four candidates agreed improved rural broadband internet access is a priority.

Related Content

Muys, who posed the question to the other candidates, said reliable rural internet is a huge issue in Flamborough-Glanbrook and is something that “just needs to be fixed.”

“I talked to a mother in Flamborough who had to drive to Tim Hortons to connect to Wi-Fi to get their kid on to online schooling,” he said. “These days, particularly after the pandemic — whether it’s school or work or life or church, you need to have access to high-speed internet.

“There has been a lot of talk but not a lot of action on that over the course of the last number of years.”

Muys said the Conservative Party is proposing to invest in rural broadband over the course of the next four years.

“And that’s not soon enough,” he said. “I hope that other parties will join us in doing the same.”

Sgro said it is “beyond ridiculous” that Flamborough-Glanbrook doesn’t have proper internet, adding the Liberal platform states that if those companies who have bought the rights to broadband for specific areas don’t have the service in place by 2025, they will lose the right to it and it will be sold to someone who will install the service.

“We’ve been waiting much, much too long … in many parts of Flamborough-Glanbrook, and we have to get it there,” he said. “If they don’t put it in by 2025, they lose it.

“We’re going to be very strict on that.”

For his part, Newick agreed that broadband internet has to be expanded into the rural areas of the riding.

“It creates a real problem for families when they don’t have access to what is basically — it should be deemed an essential service,” he said. “It has become such a big part of our lives and what we do day-to-day.

“I 100-per-cent support expanding and investing in overall better service.”

Meanwhile, Hatch, who has five young children, said with online schooling it is “absolutely paramount” that students are able to connect to reliable internet to complete their school work. However, he said the issue connects to mental health as services such as Zoom broke down barriers of isolation many people were experiencing.

“The pandemic and unreliable internet has exacerbated those feelings in those people in more areas of isolation,” he said. “Yes, we have a rural riding … but there’s no excuse for that. No person in this day and age should be cut off from the world because their internet is not reliable.

“2025 is too long to wait.”

Other questions posed at the Cable 14 debate included asking Muys what voters should make of Conservative Leader Erin O’Toole’s flip-flop on gun control, investment in skilled trades and if he supports lockdowns. Sgro was grilled on infrastructure investments in the riding and how a Liberal government would deal with urban sprawl. Both candidates were asked about their position on Hamilton’s proposed LRT.

Newick was asked about ensuring workers are paid fair wages in federal labour relations, and Hatch answered why voters should choose the Green party, with the party dealing with publicized infighting at the leadership level.