Watch for wildlife on local roads

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Collisions with wild animals can result in serious vehicle damage, personal injury or even death.

October, November and December are the three highest months for collisions. Peak times are from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. to 11 p.m.

In Ontario there is a motor vehicle vs. wild animal collision every 38 minutes. One out of every 18 collisions involves a wild animal. In 2003 there were over 13,000 reported to police. Ninety percent occur on two lane rural roads. Eighty-four percent occur in good weather.

REDUCING YOUR RISK

Scan ahead from shoulder to shoulder and watch for yellow wildlife warning signs which indicate an area of increased risk. Remember to use your headlights' high beam setting and watch for glowing eyes. Keep your vehicle under control; never swerve suddenly as this could cause you to lose control and head into a ditch or oncoming traffic. And stop safely if an animal is crossing the road - and don't forget, when one crosses others may follow.

Watch for wildlife on local roads

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Collisions with wild animals can result in serious vehicle damage, personal injury or even death.

October, November and December are the three highest months for collisions. Peak times are from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. to 11 p.m.

In Ontario there is a motor vehicle vs. wild animal collision every 38 minutes. One out of every 18 collisions involves a wild animal. In 2003 there were over 13,000 reported to police. Ninety percent occur on two lane rural roads. Eighty-four percent occur in good weather.

REDUCING YOUR RISK

Scan ahead from shoulder to shoulder and watch for yellow wildlife warning signs which indicate an area of increased risk. Remember to use your headlights' high beam setting and watch for glowing eyes. Keep your vehicle under control; never swerve suddenly as this could cause you to lose control and head into a ditch or oncoming traffic. And stop safely if an animal is crossing the road - and don't forget, when one crosses others may follow.

Watch for wildlife on local roads

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Collisions with wild animals can result in serious vehicle damage, personal injury or even death.

October, November and December are the three highest months for collisions. Peak times are from 5 a.m. to 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. to 11 p.m.

In Ontario there is a motor vehicle vs. wild animal collision every 38 minutes. One out of every 18 collisions involves a wild animal. In 2003 there were over 13,000 reported to police. Ninety percent occur on two lane rural roads. Eighty-four percent occur in good weather.

REDUCING YOUR RISK

Scan ahead from shoulder to shoulder and watch for yellow wildlife warning signs which indicate an area of increased risk. Remember to use your headlights' high beam setting and watch for glowing eyes. Keep your vehicle under control; never swerve suddenly as this could cause you to lose control and head into a ditch or oncoming traffic. And stop safely if an animal is crossing the road - and don't forget, when one crosses others may follow.