Lecture series aims to put children's literature lovers at ease

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Love to read kids' books, but ashamed to admit it when everyone else seems to be reading the latest bestseller?

Local publisher and author Bob Nielsen believes adults who enjoy children's books shouldn't be embarrassed - in fact, he wants to help kid lit fans enjoy the experience to the fullest.

"The best books for kids appeal as strongly to adults as to children because of their universal appeal and literary qualities," he notes, adding that works such as Huckleberry Finn and Alice in Wonderland can be enjoyed at deeper and deeper levels as a child matures, thanks to the inclusion of subtleties and rich humour reserved for adults only.

Nielsen, a finalist for the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour for Athlete's Foot; or How I Failed at Sports, is gearing up for a series of eight talks presented by McMaster University's Certificate in Creative Writing Program, titled "Not-So-Secret Gardens: Great Children's Books - For Adults!" that kicks off on October 24 and runs until March 27 in the Wentworth Lounge at Hamilton's Central Library.

The first session in the series, "Murdering the Guilt Part 1," is designed to put readers at ease with their love of children's literature, said Nielsen. Later sessions focus on classics such as Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (November 7), Russell Hoban's The Mouse and His Child (November 21) and Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (December 5). In the new year, Nielsen will kick things off with "Murdering the Guilt Part 2" (February 13), before delving into E.B. White's Charlotte's Web, Dodie Smith's I Capture the Castle (March 13) and finally, Lucy Boston's The Children of Green Knowe (March 27).

Nielsen himself is a longtime fan of children's literature. He was editor and publisher of the best-selling Canadian Children's Annual and his articles have appeared in many books and periodicals, including Canadian Writer's Guide ("Writing for Children") and The Hamilton Spectator ("Not Quite Wild About Harry"). In addition, he teaches the popular "Writing For Children: the Ultimate Challenge" course, which is part of the Certificate in Writing Program at McMaster University, and he has spoken about children's books to organizations such as the Canadian Authors Association and the Children's Book Centre.

All talks in the Not-So-Secret Gardens series take place on Monday evenings, from 7-9 p.m. Tickets for the first, "Murdering the Guilt," cost $10 and include a display by The Book Band, refreshments and plenty of conversation.

For further information, call 905-689-2104 or email Nielsen at RobtNielsen@aol.com.

Lecture series aims to put children's literature lovers at ease

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Love to read kids' books, but ashamed to admit it when everyone else seems to be reading the latest bestseller?

Local publisher and author Bob Nielsen believes adults who enjoy children's books shouldn't be embarrassed - in fact, he wants to help kid lit fans enjoy the experience to the fullest.

"The best books for kids appeal as strongly to adults as to children because of their universal appeal and literary qualities," he notes, adding that works such as Huckleberry Finn and Alice in Wonderland can be enjoyed at deeper and deeper levels as a child matures, thanks to the inclusion of subtleties and rich humour reserved for adults only.

Nielsen, a finalist for the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour for Athlete's Foot; or How I Failed at Sports, is gearing up for a series of eight talks presented by McMaster University's Certificate in Creative Writing Program, titled "Not-So-Secret Gardens: Great Children's Books - For Adults!" that kicks off on October 24 and runs until March 27 in the Wentworth Lounge at Hamilton's Central Library.

The first session in the series, "Murdering the Guilt Part 1," is designed to put readers at ease with their love of children's literature, said Nielsen. Later sessions focus on classics such as Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (November 7), Russell Hoban's The Mouse and His Child (November 21) and Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (December 5). In the new year, Nielsen will kick things off with "Murdering the Guilt Part 2" (February 13), before delving into E.B. White's Charlotte's Web, Dodie Smith's I Capture the Castle (March 13) and finally, Lucy Boston's The Children of Green Knowe (March 27).

Nielsen himself is a longtime fan of children's literature. He was editor and publisher of the best-selling Canadian Children's Annual and his articles have appeared in many books and periodicals, including Canadian Writer's Guide ("Writing for Children") and The Hamilton Spectator ("Not Quite Wild About Harry"). In addition, he teaches the popular "Writing For Children: the Ultimate Challenge" course, which is part of the Certificate in Writing Program at McMaster University, and he has spoken about children's books to organizations such as the Canadian Authors Association and the Children's Book Centre.

All talks in the Not-So-Secret Gardens series take place on Monday evenings, from 7-9 p.m. Tickets for the first, "Murdering the Guilt," cost $10 and include a display by The Book Band, refreshments and plenty of conversation.

For further information, call 905-689-2104 or email Nielsen at RobtNielsen@aol.com.

Lecture series aims to put children's literature lovers at ease

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Love to read kids' books, but ashamed to admit it when everyone else seems to be reading the latest bestseller?

Local publisher and author Bob Nielsen believes adults who enjoy children's books shouldn't be embarrassed - in fact, he wants to help kid lit fans enjoy the experience to the fullest.

"The best books for kids appeal as strongly to adults as to children because of their universal appeal and literary qualities," he notes, adding that works such as Huckleberry Finn and Alice in Wonderland can be enjoyed at deeper and deeper levels as a child matures, thanks to the inclusion of subtleties and rich humour reserved for adults only.

Nielsen, a finalist for the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour for Athlete's Foot; or How I Failed at Sports, is gearing up for a series of eight talks presented by McMaster University's Certificate in Creative Writing Program, titled "Not-So-Secret Gardens: Great Children's Books - For Adults!" that kicks off on October 24 and runs until March 27 in the Wentworth Lounge at Hamilton's Central Library.

The first session in the series, "Murdering the Guilt Part 1," is designed to put readers at ease with their love of children's literature, said Nielsen. Later sessions focus on classics such as Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (November 7), Russell Hoban's The Mouse and His Child (November 21) and Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (December 5). In the new year, Nielsen will kick things off with "Murdering the Guilt Part 2" (February 13), before delving into E.B. White's Charlotte's Web, Dodie Smith's I Capture the Castle (March 13) and finally, Lucy Boston's The Children of Green Knowe (March 27).

Nielsen himself is a longtime fan of children's literature. He was editor and publisher of the best-selling Canadian Children's Annual and his articles have appeared in many books and periodicals, including Canadian Writer's Guide ("Writing for Children") and The Hamilton Spectator ("Not Quite Wild About Harry"). In addition, he teaches the popular "Writing For Children: the Ultimate Challenge" course, which is part of the Certificate in Writing Program at McMaster University, and he has spoken about children's books to organizations such as the Canadian Authors Association and the Children's Book Centre.

All talks in the Not-So-Secret Gardens series take place on Monday evenings, from 7-9 p.m. Tickets for the first, "Murdering the Guilt," cost $10 and include a display by The Book Band, refreshments and plenty of conversation.

For further information, call 905-689-2104 or email Nielsen at RobtNielsen@aol.com.