Photographer follows her passion from behind the lens

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Rachelle Rousseau has a passion for horseback riding. She satisfies that longing by heading for the stables three or four times a week.

Photography is another passion of the 21-year-old Carlisle area resident, who has deftly combined her keen interest in both activities into a full-time and very busy profession, equine photography.

Rousseau fell in love with photography as a Grade 9 student at M. M. Robinson Secondary School in Burlington. She was fascinated by the gradual appearance of an image on a photo sheet in the darkroom. From then on, she was hooked - so much so that she missed 'hanging out' with her classmates because she spent every spare moment developing film in the school's darkroom.

During her final year at high school, Rachelle landed a co-op placement at a photo studio in Burlington. One day, she was called on to do a wedding shoot on her own. She has done hundreds since.

With a loan from her parents, she bought a camera, lens and flash. It seemed only natural that she should start photographing horses because she spent so much of her time at the riding stable.

"I knew horses so well. I was able to capture so much on film," she explained.

It wasn't long before fellow riders noticed Rousseau had a knack for taking stunning shots of steeds. While she continues to do portrait shots of people, babies and pets, Rachelle candidly confesses, "Definitely, my passion is horse photography."

She does a lot of close-up shots, sometimes picturing only the horse's head.

"My signature is eye shots of horses," she said. These prints are more like the "fine art of photography," she explained. They capture a mood or expression, something that holds the attention and wins the appreciation of the viewer.

Rousseau, who has competed in training dressage, often photographs local horse shows. She knows exactly when to take the shots to show the horses' best moves. She also does portrait shots of horse and rider and photographs horses that are up for sale, concentrating her efforts on "showing their best side."

Her work has been featured inside and on the covers of magazines that are popular with the horse lover's set. Her photo of a brown and white paint from the Copetown area graced the cover of a recent edition of Greenhawk, a catalogue featuring tack supplies.

In the summer, Rousseau accepted a job with the Canadian Horse Magazine, a quarterly publication that focuses on horse competitions and news. She traveled to Western Canada to photograph the Canadian, a breed of horse that is known for being sturdy and versatile. She attended the Calgary Stampede to exclusively photograph the Canadian and "covered 2,500 kilometres in 10 days in a rental car" to get additional shots of the breed. Her hard work paid off, with most of the pages in a recent edition of the magazine filled with her shots.

A collection of Rachelle's photos was on display last month at Village Gallery and Graphics on Main Street South, Waterdown. In August, her works were shown at Jitterbug Java Caf and Roasting House on Main Street North.

She plans to get a higher profile for her photos by entering them in juried shows and exhibiting them at galleries, including Carnegie Gallery in nearby Dundas. Anyone interested in seeing her work is welcome to visit her website at www.equineart.ca or drop by Village Gallery and Graphics or Gifts For The Soul in Waterdown or Dam Patch Tack near Peter's Corners.

Within the next couple of months, Rachelle hopes to have a new studio set up in her Hwy. 6 home to showcase her works. She'll also be heading to the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto next month to do what she likes best--get up close to the horses and take some photos.

Photographer follows her passion from behind the lens

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Rachelle Rousseau has a passion for horseback riding. She satisfies that longing by heading for the stables three or four times a week.

Photography is another passion of the 21-year-old Carlisle area resident, who has deftly combined her keen interest in both activities into a full-time and very busy profession, equine photography.

Rousseau fell in love with photography as a Grade 9 student at M. M. Robinson Secondary School in Burlington. She was fascinated by the gradual appearance of an image on a photo sheet in the darkroom. From then on, she was hooked - so much so that she missed 'hanging out' with her classmates because she spent every spare moment developing film in the school's darkroom.

During her final year at high school, Rachelle landed a co-op placement at a photo studio in Burlington. One day, she was called on to do a wedding shoot on her own. She has done hundreds since.

With a loan from her parents, she bought a camera, lens and flash. It seemed only natural that she should start photographing horses because she spent so much of her time at the riding stable.

"I knew horses so well. I was able to capture so much on film," she explained.

It wasn't long before fellow riders noticed Rousseau had a knack for taking stunning shots of steeds. While she continues to do portrait shots of people, babies and pets, Rachelle candidly confesses, "Definitely, my passion is horse photography."

She does a lot of close-up shots, sometimes picturing only the horse's head.

"My signature is eye shots of horses," she said. These prints are more like the "fine art of photography," she explained. They capture a mood or expression, something that holds the attention and wins the appreciation of the viewer.

Rousseau, who has competed in training dressage, often photographs local horse shows. She knows exactly when to take the shots to show the horses' best moves. She also does portrait shots of horse and rider and photographs horses that are up for sale, concentrating her efforts on "showing their best side."

Her work has been featured inside and on the covers of magazines that are popular with the horse lover's set. Her photo of a brown and white paint from the Copetown area graced the cover of a recent edition of Greenhawk, a catalogue featuring tack supplies.

In the summer, Rousseau accepted a job with the Canadian Horse Magazine, a quarterly publication that focuses on horse competitions and news. She traveled to Western Canada to photograph the Canadian, a breed of horse that is known for being sturdy and versatile. She attended the Calgary Stampede to exclusively photograph the Canadian and "covered 2,500 kilometres in 10 days in a rental car" to get additional shots of the breed. Her hard work paid off, with most of the pages in a recent edition of the magazine filled with her shots.

A collection of Rachelle's photos was on display last month at Village Gallery and Graphics on Main Street South, Waterdown. In August, her works were shown at Jitterbug Java Caf and Roasting House on Main Street North.

She plans to get a higher profile for her photos by entering them in juried shows and exhibiting them at galleries, including Carnegie Gallery in nearby Dundas. Anyone interested in seeing her work is welcome to visit her website at www.equineart.ca or drop by Village Gallery and Graphics or Gifts For The Soul in Waterdown or Dam Patch Tack near Peter's Corners.

Within the next couple of months, Rachelle hopes to have a new studio set up in her Hwy. 6 home to showcase her works. She'll also be heading to the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto next month to do what she likes best--get up close to the horses and take some photos.

Photographer follows her passion from behind the lens

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Rachelle Rousseau has a passion for horseback riding. She satisfies that longing by heading for the stables three or four times a week.

Photography is another passion of the 21-year-old Carlisle area resident, who has deftly combined her keen interest in both activities into a full-time and very busy profession, equine photography.

Rousseau fell in love with photography as a Grade 9 student at M. M. Robinson Secondary School in Burlington. She was fascinated by the gradual appearance of an image on a photo sheet in the darkroom. From then on, she was hooked - so much so that she missed 'hanging out' with her classmates because she spent every spare moment developing film in the school's darkroom.

During her final year at high school, Rachelle landed a co-op placement at a photo studio in Burlington. One day, she was called on to do a wedding shoot on her own. She has done hundreds since.

With a loan from her parents, she bought a camera, lens and flash. It seemed only natural that she should start photographing horses because she spent so much of her time at the riding stable.

"I knew horses so well. I was able to capture so much on film," she explained.

It wasn't long before fellow riders noticed Rousseau had a knack for taking stunning shots of steeds. While she continues to do portrait shots of people, babies and pets, Rachelle candidly confesses, "Definitely, my passion is horse photography."

She does a lot of close-up shots, sometimes picturing only the horse's head.

"My signature is eye shots of horses," she said. These prints are more like the "fine art of photography," she explained. They capture a mood or expression, something that holds the attention and wins the appreciation of the viewer.

Rousseau, who has competed in training dressage, often photographs local horse shows. She knows exactly when to take the shots to show the horses' best moves. She also does portrait shots of horse and rider and photographs horses that are up for sale, concentrating her efforts on "showing their best side."

Her work has been featured inside and on the covers of magazines that are popular with the horse lover's set. Her photo of a brown and white paint from the Copetown area graced the cover of a recent edition of Greenhawk, a catalogue featuring tack supplies.

In the summer, Rousseau accepted a job with the Canadian Horse Magazine, a quarterly publication that focuses on horse competitions and news. She traveled to Western Canada to photograph the Canadian, a breed of horse that is known for being sturdy and versatile. She attended the Calgary Stampede to exclusively photograph the Canadian and "covered 2,500 kilometres in 10 days in a rental car" to get additional shots of the breed. Her hard work paid off, with most of the pages in a recent edition of the magazine filled with her shots.

A collection of Rachelle's photos was on display last month at Village Gallery and Graphics on Main Street South, Waterdown. In August, her works were shown at Jitterbug Java Caf and Roasting House on Main Street North.

She plans to get a higher profile for her photos by entering them in juried shows and exhibiting them at galleries, including Carnegie Gallery in nearby Dundas. Anyone interested in seeing her work is welcome to visit her website at www.equineart.ca or drop by Village Gallery and Graphics or Gifts For The Soul in Waterdown or Dam Patch Tack near Peter's Corners.

Within the next couple of months, Rachelle hopes to have a new studio set up in her Hwy. 6 home to showcase her works. She'll also be heading to the Royal Winter Fair in Toronto next month to do what she likes best--get up close to the horses and take some photos.