Community revs up the engines for Eric

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

How far would you go for someone you love?

Ted Lindsay, advertising manager for the Flamborough Review, has had plenty of time to ponder the question that many - fortunately - never have to answer.

Three years ago, at age two, Lindsay's nephew Eric was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. The inherited disorder, which affects boys almost exclusively, carries a grim, and fairly predictable, prognosis: toddlers are late learning to walk, and then nearly all lose that ability sometime between the age of 7 and 12. Ultimately, as a disease that attacks the muscles, DMD shuts down the heart. Many of those afflicted have a difficult time reaching their third decade of life.

"He's just such a neat little kid," Lindsay said of his five-year-old nephew. "He just goes with the flow."

Lindsay points out that medical advancements have meant that Eric, now in Senior Kindergarten, has a weapon to stave off the effects of the disease. Each day, he takes his regimen of steroids (usually easing the pills down in a spoonful of jam) and exercises. Special arrangements have been made at his school, and in day-to-day life, notes Lindsay, Eric is a typical kid. Just a little slower.

"(The disease) doesn't affect him as much now as it will in the future," he said. "He's involved at school; he's just not as muscularly developed as other children his age."

But the treatment, which wasn't available to DMD patients as recently as five years ago, is not a cure. Which means Eric's family - mom and dad, Darlene and Mike Morden - and his doctors will be watching and measuring his mobility constantly.

"There have been a lot of advancements, and we've seen some improvement in Eric in the last six to eight months, due to more confidence since he's been taking the pills," said Lindsay, stressing that the steroids will only slow the disease, not cure it.

"All of Eric's muscles will, well, dystrophy, and his body will just be a shell," he explained. "And the heart is a muscle, so the end result is everything shuts down.

"Our fight is kind of a race against time."

DMD first came into the public eye 10 years ago when London father John Davidson answered the question of how far he would go for his son, Jesse, by pushing his son's wheelchair 3,300 km across the province to raise more than $1.5 million for genetic research. He then extended Jesse's Journey to an awe-inspiring trek across Canada - a total of 8,272 km in 286 days.

Inspired by Davidson, Lindsay and his wife Heather helped launch Eric's Amazing Race three years ago, an annual scavenger hunt/silent auction fundraiser that has been embraced and supported by the Flamborough and Halton communities. Last year, Lindsay reports, the event raised some $20,000; this year, local sponsors have come on board enthusiastically.

Among the silent auction items is a jersey Davidson procured from last year's Memorial Cup champion London Knights, signed by Millgrove's Danny Syvret. Metroland Printing and Publishing, the Review's parent company, has kicked in a pair of platinum tickets for a Toronto Raptors game. The Hamilton Bulldogs, the Toronto Marlies, La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries, Waterdown's KidSmart'l Arts and La Feminique Lingerie and Swimwear have also donated items that will be going up for bids.

Participants can opt to just drive the route, or just catch up with the group afterwards at the restaurant - or enjoy the whole day. For those who do drive, Geoff Hogarth of Pioneer Gas Stations kicked in $600 in "Bonus Bucks" to help out at the pumps.

Last year, approximately 100 drivers wound their way along the back roads in Burlington and Flamborough, while approximately 250 people attended the silent auction. Davidson, who recently spoke at a Rotary Club of Flamborough AM meeting and was boosted by the group with a cheque for $500, will also speak at Eric's Amazing Race, as he has for the past two years.

Lindsay's goal for this year is to better the event's 2004 overall fundraising amount, and to reach out to other families affected by DMD. "If there are families out there and this is affecting their lives, I want them to know that there are people nearby," he said.

* * *

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Eric's Amazing Race takes place next Saturday, November 5. Registration is from 11 a.m. until noon at Bruce T. Lindley School (2510 Cavendish Drive, Burlington). After a spectacular drive through parts of Flamborough and north Burlington, participants will meet at Philthy McNasty's in the Sobey's plaza on the North Service Road for a silent auction, which will run from 3-6 p.m. Registration cost is $10 per person.

To pre-register, call 905-331-6874 or email tether69@hotmail.com.

Community revs up the engines for Eric

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

How far would you go for someone you love?

Ted Lindsay, advertising manager for the Flamborough Review, has had plenty of time to ponder the question that many - fortunately - never have to answer.

Three years ago, at age two, Lindsay's nephew Eric was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. The inherited disorder, which affects boys almost exclusively, carries a grim, and fairly predictable, prognosis: toddlers are late learning to walk, and then nearly all lose that ability sometime between the age of 7 and 12. Ultimately, as a disease that attacks the muscles, DMD shuts down the heart. Many of those afflicted have a difficult time reaching their third decade of life.

"He's just such a neat little kid," Lindsay said of his five-year-old nephew. "He just goes with the flow."

Lindsay points out that medical advancements have meant that Eric, now in Senior Kindergarten, has a weapon to stave off the effects of the disease. Each day, he takes his regimen of steroids (usually easing the pills down in a spoonful of jam) and exercises. Special arrangements have been made at his school, and in day-to-day life, notes Lindsay, Eric is a typical kid. Just a little slower.

"(The disease) doesn't affect him as much now as it will in the future," he said. "He's involved at school; he's just not as muscularly developed as other children his age."

But the treatment, which wasn't available to DMD patients as recently as five years ago, is not a cure. Which means Eric's family - mom and dad, Darlene and Mike Morden - and his doctors will be watching and measuring his mobility constantly.

"There have been a lot of advancements, and we've seen some improvement in Eric in the last six to eight months, due to more confidence since he's been taking the pills," said Lindsay, stressing that the steroids will only slow the disease, not cure it.

"All of Eric's muscles will, well, dystrophy, and his body will just be a shell," he explained. "And the heart is a muscle, so the end result is everything shuts down.

"Our fight is kind of a race against time."

DMD first came into the public eye 10 years ago when London father John Davidson answered the question of how far he would go for his son, Jesse, by pushing his son's wheelchair 3,300 km across the province to raise more than $1.5 million for genetic research. He then extended Jesse's Journey to an awe-inspiring trek across Canada - a total of 8,272 km in 286 days.

Inspired by Davidson, Lindsay and his wife Heather helped launch Eric's Amazing Race three years ago, an annual scavenger hunt/silent auction fundraiser that has been embraced and supported by the Flamborough and Halton communities. Last year, Lindsay reports, the event raised some $20,000; this year, local sponsors have come on board enthusiastically.

Among the silent auction items is a jersey Davidson procured from last year's Memorial Cup champion London Knights, signed by Millgrove's Danny Syvret. Metroland Printing and Publishing, the Review's parent company, has kicked in a pair of platinum tickets for a Toronto Raptors game. The Hamilton Bulldogs, the Toronto Marlies, La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries, Waterdown's KidSmart'l Arts and La Feminique Lingerie and Swimwear have also donated items that will be going up for bids.

Participants can opt to just drive the route, or just catch up with the group afterwards at the restaurant - or enjoy the whole day. For those who do drive, Geoff Hogarth of Pioneer Gas Stations kicked in $600 in "Bonus Bucks" to help out at the pumps.

Last year, approximately 100 drivers wound their way along the back roads in Burlington and Flamborough, while approximately 250 people attended the silent auction. Davidson, who recently spoke at a Rotary Club of Flamborough AM meeting and was boosted by the group with a cheque for $500, will also speak at Eric's Amazing Race, as he has for the past two years.

Lindsay's goal for this year is to better the event's 2004 overall fundraising amount, and to reach out to other families affected by DMD. "If there are families out there and this is affecting their lives, I want them to know that there are people nearby," he said.

* * *

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Eric's Amazing Race takes place next Saturday, November 5. Registration is from 11 a.m. until noon at Bruce T. Lindley School (2510 Cavendish Drive, Burlington). After a spectacular drive through parts of Flamborough and north Burlington, participants will meet at Philthy McNasty's in the Sobey's plaza on the North Service Road for a silent auction, which will run from 3-6 p.m. Registration cost is $10 per person.

To pre-register, call 905-331-6874 or email tether69@hotmail.com.

Community revs up the engines for Eric

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

How far would you go for someone you love?

Ted Lindsay, advertising manager for the Flamborough Review, has had plenty of time to ponder the question that many - fortunately - never have to answer.

Three years ago, at age two, Lindsay's nephew Eric was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. The inherited disorder, which affects boys almost exclusively, carries a grim, and fairly predictable, prognosis: toddlers are late learning to walk, and then nearly all lose that ability sometime between the age of 7 and 12. Ultimately, as a disease that attacks the muscles, DMD shuts down the heart. Many of those afflicted have a difficult time reaching their third decade of life.

"He's just such a neat little kid," Lindsay said of his five-year-old nephew. "He just goes with the flow."

Lindsay points out that medical advancements have meant that Eric, now in Senior Kindergarten, has a weapon to stave off the effects of the disease. Each day, he takes his regimen of steroids (usually easing the pills down in a spoonful of jam) and exercises. Special arrangements have been made at his school, and in day-to-day life, notes Lindsay, Eric is a typical kid. Just a little slower.

"(The disease) doesn't affect him as much now as it will in the future," he said. "He's involved at school; he's just not as muscularly developed as other children his age."

But the treatment, which wasn't available to DMD patients as recently as five years ago, is not a cure. Which means Eric's family - mom and dad, Darlene and Mike Morden - and his doctors will be watching and measuring his mobility constantly.

"There have been a lot of advancements, and we've seen some improvement in Eric in the last six to eight months, due to more confidence since he's been taking the pills," said Lindsay, stressing that the steroids will only slow the disease, not cure it.

"All of Eric's muscles will, well, dystrophy, and his body will just be a shell," he explained. "And the heart is a muscle, so the end result is everything shuts down.

"Our fight is kind of a race against time."

DMD first came into the public eye 10 years ago when London father John Davidson answered the question of how far he would go for his son, Jesse, by pushing his son's wheelchair 3,300 km across the province to raise more than $1.5 million for genetic research. He then extended Jesse's Journey to an awe-inspiring trek across Canada - a total of 8,272 km in 286 days.

Inspired by Davidson, Lindsay and his wife Heather helped launch Eric's Amazing Race three years ago, an annual scavenger hunt/silent auction fundraiser that has been embraced and supported by the Flamborough and Halton communities. Last year, Lindsay reports, the event raised some $20,000; this year, local sponsors have come on board enthusiastically.

Among the silent auction items is a jersey Davidson procured from last year's Memorial Cup champion London Knights, signed by Millgrove's Danny Syvret. Metroland Printing and Publishing, the Review's parent company, has kicked in a pair of platinum tickets for a Toronto Raptors game. The Hamilton Bulldogs, the Toronto Marlies, La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries, Waterdown's KidSmart'l Arts and La Feminique Lingerie and Swimwear have also donated items that will be going up for bids.

Participants can opt to just drive the route, or just catch up with the group afterwards at the restaurant - or enjoy the whole day. For those who do drive, Geoff Hogarth of Pioneer Gas Stations kicked in $600 in "Bonus Bucks" to help out at the pumps.

Last year, approximately 100 drivers wound their way along the back roads in Burlington and Flamborough, while approximately 250 people attended the silent auction. Davidson, who recently spoke at a Rotary Club of Flamborough AM meeting and was boosted by the group with a cheque for $500, will also speak at Eric's Amazing Race, as he has for the past two years.

Lindsay's goal for this year is to better the event's 2004 overall fundraising amount, and to reach out to other families affected by DMD. "If there are families out there and this is affecting their lives, I want them to know that there are people nearby," he said.

* * *

HOW YOU CAN HELP

Eric's Amazing Race takes place next Saturday, November 5. Registration is from 11 a.m. until noon at Bruce T. Lindley School (2510 Cavendish Drive, Burlington). After a spectacular drive through parts of Flamborough and north Burlington, participants will meet at Philthy McNasty's in the Sobey's plaza on the North Service Road for a silent auction, which will run from 3-6 p.m. Registration cost is $10 per person.

To pre-register, call 905-331-6874 or email tether69@hotmail.com.