Growth should be slow and controlled: residents

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Despite several planners' maps indicating otherwise for north Waterdown, Parkside Drive resident Barbara Neat is insistent that the 329 rural acres opposite her home be developed gradually, and only with detached, single family homes.

"Development is going way too fast here," said Neat, whose input was among several comments and questions aired during a public consultation meeting organized by the city Monday night.

Indeed, the population of Waterdown doubled between 1991 and 2001. And Waterdown is headed for another boom, according to a conceptual residential and commercial layout created by city staff and consultants.

Monday's public meeting focused on the area north of Parkside Drive, east of Centre Road. Borer's Creek runs through the centre, creating two enclaves. It's the second public meeting held to discuss the area's future. The first was organized in June, 2004.

Lots for detached houses, townhomes and apartment buildings are proposed, on each side of the creek, as well as space for two 100,000 square foot commercial properties. Two parks are included on each side of the layout. And a road is slated to run east-west along the north edge. A walking trail runs in the same direction connecting the two neighbourhoods.

While the meeting was intended to determine a desired new neighbourhood for north Waterdown, Robert Reynolds is skeptical of the process.

"This whole thing is a charade, the planners have already decided what is going to happen here," he charged. "How is what we say going to affect anything?"

Reynolds would like to see larger lots with at least 100-foot depths and 50-foot widths, in new neighbourhoods, to better reflect the existing spaciousness in established areas of town.

"In Burlington the new homes built are only six to eight feet apart with monster homes wedged together so tightly that you can't even put a walkway between them," said Reynold, who fears Waterdown will be turned into a small city, rather than the small town locals want.

Northlawn Avenue resident Rick Breznik wants a multitude of layouts shown before city councillors approve this secondary plan.

"Show them neighbourhoods with only low density housing on it, not just layouts with mixed developments that you're showing us here," said Breznik.

"That's not approvable," said Jamie Bennett, a planner with consultant Marshall Macklin Monaghan. The province expects mixed housing to be put in place, he added.

Development in the north end, south end and east at a subdivision called Uptown Estates are expected to begin work simultaneously.

Already, two companies have submitted plans to build. MC2 Homes has asked the city to rezone 619 Centre Rd., so that it can split the site into six sections to accommodate townhomes, apartments and live work commercial/residential spaces.

MC2 Homes is currently appealing to the Ontario Municipal Board claiming the city is dragging its heals on processing its application. The hearing is slated for mid-January, 2006.

Parkside Hills has submitted a similar urban/commercial plan nearby Waterdown District High School.

Due to the timing of these applications, this process of creating a secondary plan could be redundant or overlapping, said Bennett.

Residents keen to state their visions for Waterdown north should send them in by October 28 to the City of Hamilton's planning and economic development department (www.myhamilton.ca).

Following the feedback received Monday night, staff will prepare a final preferred concept, send it out for another public consultation and then afterwards seek council approval.

Growth should be slow and controlled: residents

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Despite several planners' maps indicating otherwise for north Waterdown, Parkside Drive resident Barbara Neat is insistent that the 329 rural acres opposite her home be developed gradually, and only with detached, single family homes.

"Development is going way too fast here," said Neat, whose input was among several comments and questions aired during a public consultation meeting organized by the city Monday night.

Indeed, the population of Waterdown doubled between 1991 and 2001. And Waterdown is headed for another boom, according to a conceptual residential and commercial layout created by city staff and consultants.

Monday's public meeting focused on the area north of Parkside Drive, east of Centre Road. Borer's Creek runs through the centre, creating two enclaves. It's the second public meeting held to discuss the area's future. The first was organized in June, 2004.

Lots for detached houses, townhomes and apartment buildings are proposed, on each side of the creek, as well as space for two 100,000 square foot commercial properties. Two parks are included on each side of the layout. And a road is slated to run east-west along the north edge. A walking trail runs in the same direction connecting the two neighbourhoods.

While the meeting was intended to determine a desired new neighbourhood for north Waterdown, Robert Reynolds is skeptical of the process.

"This whole thing is a charade, the planners have already decided what is going to happen here," he charged. "How is what we say going to affect anything?"

Reynolds would like to see larger lots with at least 100-foot depths and 50-foot widths, in new neighbourhoods, to better reflect the existing spaciousness in established areas of town.

"In Burlington the new homes built are only six to eight feet apart with monster homes wedged together so tightly that you can't even put a walkway between them," said Reynold, who fears Waterdown will be turned into a small city, rather than the small town locals want.

Northlawn Avenue resident Rick Breznik wants a multitude of layouts shown before city councillors approve this secondary plan.

"Show them neighbourhoods with only low density housing on it, not just layouts with mixed developments that you're showing us here," said Breznik.

"That's not approvable," said Jamie Bennett, a planner with consultant Marshall Macklin Monaghan. The province expects mixed housing to be put in place, he added.

Development in the north end, south end and east at a subdivision called Uptown Estates are expected to begin work simultaneously.

Already, two companies have submitted plans to build. MC2 Homes has asked the city to rezone 619 Centre Rd., so that it can split the site into six sections to accommodate townhomes, apartments and live work commercial/residential spaces.

MC2 Homes is currently appealing to the Ontario Municipal Board claiming the city is dragging its heals on processing its application. The hearing is slated for mid-January, 2006.

Parkside Hills has submitted a similar urban/commercial plan nearby Waterdown District High School.

Due to the timing of these applications, this process of creating a secondary plan could be redundant or overlapping, said Bennett.

Residents keen to state their visions for Waterdown north should send them in by October 28 to the City of Hamilton's planning and economic development department (www.myhamilton.ca).

Following the feedback received Monday night, staff will prepare a final preferred concept, send it out for another public consultation and then afterwards seek council approval.

Growth should be slow and controlled: residents

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Despite several planners' maps indicating otherwise for north Waterdown, Parkside Drive resident Barbara Neat is insistent that the 329 rural acres opposite her home be developed gradually, and only with detached, single family homes.

"Development is going way too fast here," said Neat, whose input was among several comments and questions aired during a public consultation meeting organized by the city Monday night.

Indeed, the population of Waterdown doubled between 1991 and 2001. And Waterdown is headed for another boom, according to a conceptual residential and commercial layout created by city staff and consultants.

Monday's public meeting focused on the area north of Parkside Drive, east of Centre Road. Borer's Creek runs through the centre, creating two enclaves. It's the second public meeting held to discuss the area's future. The first was organized in June, 2004.

Lots for detached houses, townhomes and apartment buildings are proposed, on each side of the creek, as well as space for two 100,000 square foot commercial properties. Two parks are included on each side of the layout. And a road is slated to run east-west along the north edge. A walking trail runs in the same direction connecting the two neighbourhoods.

While the meeting was intended to determine a desired new neighbourhood for north Waterdown, Robert Reynolds is skeptical of the process.

"This whole thing is a charade, the planners have already decided what is going to happen here," he charged. "How is what we say going to affect anything?"

Reynolds would like to see larger lots with at least 100-foot depths and 50-foot widths, in new neighbourhoods, to better reflect the existing spaciousness in established areas of town.

"In Burlington the new homes built are only six to eight feet apart with monster homes wedged together so tightly that you can't even put a walkway between them," said Reynold, who fears Waterdown will be turned into a small city, rather than the small town locals want.

Northlawn Avenue resident Rick Breznik wants a multitude of layouts shown before city councillors approve this secondary plan.

"Show them neighbourhoods with only low density housing on it, not just layouts with mixed developments that you're showing us here," said Breznik.

"That's not approvable," said Jamie Bennett, a planner with consultant Marshall Macklin Monaghan. The province expects mixed housing to be put in place, he added.

Development in the north end, south end and east at a subdivision called Uptown Estates are expected to begin work simultaneously.

Already, two companies have submitted plans to build. MC2 Homes has asked the city to rezone 619 Centre Rd., so that it can split the site into six sections to accommodate townhomes, apartments and live work commercial/residential spaces.

MC2 Homes is currently appealing to the Ontario Municipal Board claiming the city is dragging its heals on processing its application. The hearing is slated for mid-January, 2006.

Parkside Hills has submitted a similar urban/commercial plan nearby Waterdown District High School.

Due to the timing of these applications, this process of creating a secondary plan could be redundant or overlapping, said Bennett.

Residents keen to state their visions for Waterdown north should send them in by October 28 to the City of Hamilton's planning and economic development department (www.myhamilton.ca).

Following the feedback received Monday night, staff will prepare a final preferred concept, send it out for another public consultation and then afterwards seek council approval.