From City Hall

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Review invited two of Flamborough's elected representatives to weigh in on the history and future of development in Waterdown.

Here's what Councillor Margaret McCarthy had to say.

* * *

Many of you might remember the Waterdown/Aldershot Master Transportation Plan, which dealt with the Waterdown Bypass from back in the days when we were still Flamborough. The creation of the Hamilton supercity put the whole bypass plan on hold for a few years but now it has resurfaced.

The upshot is this: we are required to create an east-west transportation corridor to accommodate the future growth of Waterdown. Once the Province passed Official Plan Amendment (OPA 28) in June 2002, it mandated that the transportation corridor be revisited by Hamilton staff.

OPA 28 opens the doors for 6,500 new residential units (or upwards of 15,000 new residents) in Waterdown - all of which will be built within the next 10 years, if not sooner - and we are in the position where we have to provide a road transportation network to accommodate that growth.

Study groups have been evaluating the process. Technical information, social impacts, costing components, and environmental issues have all been evaluated and presented to the public in the form of both presentations and public meetings. The work is not over yet; we are now in the process of further environmental studies with a report to go to Council this November.

Please remember this: we are legally required by the Province to create this transportation corridor based on the development the Province sanctioned when it passed OPA 28. The city has no say in the matter other than trying to accommodate this new growth in Waterdown.

My introduction to OPA 28 was in my first term as a Flamborough Councillor over 12 years ago and it had been in the works prior to that for seven years.

The planning department was dealing with the requirements set down by the Province for development land. The province required, back in those days, that a 20-year supply of land be available for development purposes. The Province, having jurisdiction on all municipal affairs, set the wheels in motion for OPA 28 with those provincial policy statements.

In fact, OPA 28 was started in the late 1980s. Flamborough town council, wishing to have a more controlled and phased development plan, fought to have a slower growth strategy implemented but eventually was superceded by both the Ontario Municipal Board, and a challenge at the Cabinet level. The battle is now over; we fought and lost twice.

Now what is left on the table is the approval of what will translate to the doubling of the population of Waterdown over the next 10 years. What is crucial from my position now is to get on with the new road networks and other infrastructure in order to facilitate the development.

We cannot absorb 6,500 more homes on our existing roads corridors without new roads being built. I will be supporting the new road corridors plan, which widens Waterdown Road and runs along up the mountain brow and down through the lands east of Flanders Drive. I will be supporting the East West corridor which runs primarily between the 4th and the 5th Concessions.

I do realize this is an extremely politicized, contentious issue but I also realize that if I don't take a position on devising new transportation corridors that we will be left with a doubled Waterdown population to be absorbed on our existing roads and I will not let that happen.

Anyone who has been following my political career will know that I have never taken a financial contribution and that I am self-funded; the relevance here is that I do not owe the development industry - or anyone for that matter - special consideration or favors.

Rest assured, my position in support of these new roads is because I know that there is nothing the development industry would like more than to go back to the OMB and say 'You have approved our development but because it is so contentious, Council will not deal with the transportation corridors.'

The fallout would be that we will end up absorbing the growth on our existing roads without the developers having to pay for new roads, and Dundas Street and Parkside Drive will not, and should not, be expected to absorb that kind of intensity.

Other roads need to be built, and have been identified as such and I will be supporting those new road networks.

From City Hall

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Review invited two of Flamborough's elected representatives to weigh in on the history and future of development in Waterdown.

Here's what Councillor Margaret McCarthy had to say.

* * *

Many of you might remember the Waterdown/Aldershot Master Transportation Plan, which dealt with the Waterdown Bypass from back in the days when we were still Flamborough. The creation of the Hamilton supercity put the whole bypass plan on hold for a few years but now it has resurfaced.

The upshot is this: we are required to create an east-west transportation corridor to accommodate the future growth of Waterdown. Once the Province passed Official Plan Amendment (OPA 28) in June 2002, it mandated that the transportation corridor be revisited by Hamilton staff.

OPA 28 opens the doors for 6,500 new residential units (or upwards of 15,000 new residents) in Waterdown - all of which will be built within the next 10 years, if not sooner - and we are in the position where we have to provide a road transportation network to accommodate that growth.

Study groups have been evaluating the process. Technical information, social impacts, costing components, and environmental issues have all been evaluated and presented to the public in the form of both presentations and public meetings. The work is not over yet; we are now in the process of further environmental studies with a report to go to Council this November.

Please remember this: we are legally required by the Province to create this transportation corridor based on the development the Province sanctioned when it passed OPA 28. The city has no say in the matter other than trying to accommodate this new growth in Waterdown.

My introduction to OPA 28 was in my first term as a Flamborough Councillor over 12 years ago and it had been in the works prior to that for seven years.

The planning department was dealing with the requirements set down by the Province for development land. The province required, back in those days, that a 20-year supply of land be available for development purposes. The Province, having jurisdiction on all municipal affairs, set the wheels in motion for OPA 28 with those provincial policy statements.

In fact, OPA 28 was started in the late 1980s. Flamborough town council, wishing to have a more controlled and phased development plan, fought to have a slower growth strategy implemented but eventually was superceded by both the Ontario Municipal Board, and a challenge at the Cabinet level. The battle is now over; we fought and lost twice.

Now what is left on the table is the approval of what will translate to the doubling of the population of Waterdown over the next 10 years. What is crucial from my position now is to get on with the new road networks and other infrastructure in order to facilitate the development.

We cannot absorb 6,500 more homes on our existing roads corridors without new roads being built. I will be supporting the new road corridors plan, which widens Waterdown Road and runs along up the mountain brow and down through the lands east of Flanders Drive. I will be supporting the East West corridor which runs primarily between the 4th and the 5th Concessions.

I do realize this is an extremely politicized, contentious issue but I also realize that if I don't take a position on devising new transportation corridors that we will be left with a doubled Waterdown population to be absorbed on our existing roads and I will not let that happen.

Anyone who has been following my political career will know that I have never taken a financial contribution and that I am self-funded; the relevance here is that I do not owe the development industry - or anyone for that matter - special consideration or favors.

Rest assured, my position in support of these new roads is because I know that there is nothing the development industry would like more than to go back to the OMB and say 'You have approved our development but because it is so contentious, Council will not deal with the transportation corridors.'

The fallout would be that we will end up absorbing the growth on our existing roads without the developers having to pay for new roads, and Dundas Street and Parkside Drive will not, and should not, be expected to absorb that kind of intensity.

Other roads need to be built, and have been identified as such and I will be supporting those new road networks.

From City Hall

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Review invited two of Flamborough's elected representatives to weigh in on the history and future of development in Waterdown.

Here's what Councillor Margaret McCarthy had to say.

* * *

Many of you might remember the Waterdown/Aldershot Master Transportation Plan, which dealt with the Waterdown Bypass from back in the days when we were still Flamborough. The creation of the Hamilton supercity put the whole bypass plan on hold for a few years but now it has resurfaced.

The upshot is this: we are required to create an east-west transportation corridor to accommodate the future growth of Waterdown. Once the Province passed Official Plan Amendment (OPA 28) in June 2002, it mandated that the transportation corridor be revisited by Hamilton staff.

OPA 28 opens the doors for 6,500 new residential units (or upwards of 15,000 new residents) in Waterdown - all of which will be built within the next 10 years, if not sooner - and we are in the position where we have to provide a road transportation network to accommodate that growth.

Study groups have been evaluating the process. Technical information, social impacts, costing components, and environmental issues have all been evaluated and presented to the public in the form of both presentations and public meetings. The work is not over yet; we are now in the process of further environmental studies with a report to go to Council this November.

Please remember this: we are legally required by the Province to create this transportation corridor based on the development the Province sanctioned when it passed OPA 28. The city has no say in the matter other than trying to accommodate this new growth in Waterdown.

My introduction to OPA 28 was in my first term as a Flamborough Councillor over 12 years ago and it had been in the works prior to that for seven years.

The planning department was dealing with the requirements set down by the Province for development land. The province required, back in those days, that a 20-year supply of land be available for development purposes. The Province, having jurisdiction on all municipal affairs, set the wheels in motion for OPA 28 with those provincial policy statements.

In fact, OPA 28 was started in the late 1980s. Flamborough town council, wishing to have a more controlled and phased development plan, fought to have a slower growth strategy implemented but eventually was superceded by both the Ontario Municipal Board, and a challenge at the Cabinet level. The battle is now over; we fought and lost twice.

Now what is left on the table is the approval of what will translate to the doubling of the population of Waterdown over the next 10 years. What is crucial from my position now is to get on with the new road networks and other infrastructure in order to facilitate the development.

We cannot absorb 6,500 more homes on our existing roads corridors without new roads being built. I will be supporting the new road corridors plan, which widens Waterdown Road and runs along up the mountain brow and down through the lands east of Flanders Drive. I will be supporting the East West corridor which runs primarily between the 4th and the 5th Concessions.

I do realize this is an extremely politicized, contentious issue but I also realize that if I don't take a position on devising new transportation corridors that we will be left with a doubled Waterdown population to be absorbed on our existing roads and I will not let that happen.

Anyone who has been following my political career will know that I have never taken a financial contribution and that I am self-funded; the relevance here is that I do not owe the development industry - or anyone for that matter - special consideration or favors.

Rest assured, my position in support of these new roads is because I know that there is nothing the development industry would like more than to go back to the OMB and say 'You have approved our development but because it is so contentious, Council will not deal with the transportation corridors.'

The fallout would be that we will end up absorbing the growth on our existing roads without the developers having to pay for new roads, and Dundas Street and Parkside Drive will not, and should not, be expected to absorb that kind of intensity.

Other roads need to be built, and have been identified as such and I will be supporting those new road networks.