Take the time to listen, and offer a heartfelt thank you to all who served

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

I would like to say "Thank You" to all of our veterans, both locally, and abroad. Thank you for all that you went through for us and for reminding us of what a wonderful country we live in and why.

I was at Fortinos this morning, Saturday, when I spotted a veteran, John Copeland, (I hope that I remembered his name correctly), sitting with his donation box and poppies.

My daughter and I went up to him and as I started to look through my purse for some change I noticed that that was what everyone was doing, looking for spare change, taking a poppy, and not saying too much to this honourable man who experienced the unimaginable so that we could live in a free country.

So, instead of grabbing my loose change I took out my largest bill, walked over to him, and thanked him from the bottom of my heart for all that he did for us.

I ended up chatting with him for awhile and he told me a little bit about his experience.

He told me that he lost his best friend in battle, and that after that he tried to not get too close to his fellow soldiers.

He told me that when children ask him questions he tries to answer as best he can without scaring them.

And he told me that even now, he has days when he just can't talk about it at all.

During our conversation I noticed that the majority of people who came for a poppy would quickly put in their change and mumble a hello or a quiet thank you.

What I would like to suggest to everyone is to dig out your largest bill and shake the veteran's hand, look him or her in the eye, and say a very heartfelt thank you to that brave individual.

Because, after all that he had been through, John Copeland told me that he would, indeed, do it all over again.

Jennifer Clarke-Brophy

Waterdown

Take the time to listen, and offer a heartfelt thank you to all who served

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

I would like to say "Thank You" to all of our veterans, both locally, and abroad. Thank you for all that you went through for us and for reminding us of what a wonderful country we live in and why.

I was at Fortinos this morning, Saturday, when I spotted a veteran, John Copeland, (I hope that I remembered his name correctly), sitting with his donation box and poppies.

My daughter and I went up to him and as I started to look through my purse for some change I noticed that that was what everyone was doing, looking for spare change, taking a poppy, and not saying too much to this honourable man who experienced the unimaginable so that we could live in a free country.

So, instead of grabbing my loose change I took out my largest bill, walked over to him, and thanked him from the bottom of my heart for all that he did for us.

I ended up chatting with him for awhile and he told me a little bit about his experience.

He told me that he lost his best friend in battle, and that after that he tried to not get too close to his fellow soldiers.

He told me that when children ask him questions he tries to answer as best he can without scaring them.

And he told me that even now, he has days when he just can't talk about it at all.

During our conversation I noticed that the majority of people who came for a poppy would quickly put in their change and mumble a hello or a quiet thank you.

What I would like to suggest to everyone is to dig out your largest bill and shake the veteran's hand, look him or her in the eye, and say a very heartfelt thank you to that brave individual.

Because, after all that he had been through, John Copeland told me that he would, indeed, do it all over again.

Jennifer Clarke-Brophy

Waterdown

Take the time to listen, and offer a heartfelt thank you to all who served

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

I would like to say "Thank You" to all of our veterans, both locally, and abroad. Thank you for all that you went through for us and for reminding us of what a wonderful country we live in and why.

I was at Fortinos this morning, Saturday, when I spotted a veteran, John Copeland, (I hope that I remembered his name correctly), sitting with his donation box and poppies.

My daughter and I went up to him and as I started to look through my purse for some change I noticed that that was what everyone was doing, looking for spare change, taking a poppy, and not saying too much to this honourable man who experienced the unimaginable so that we could live in a free country.

So, instead of grabbing my loose change I took out my largest bill, walked over to him, and thanked him from the bottom of my heart for all that he did for us.

I ended up chatting with him for awhile and he told me a little bit about his experience.

He told me that he lost his best friend in battle, and that after that he tried to not get too close to his fellow soldiers.

He told me that when children ask him questions he tries to answer as best he can without scaring them.

And he told me that even now, he has days when he just can't talk about it at all.

During our conversation I noticed that the majority of people who came for a poppy would quickly put in their change and mumble a hello or a quiet thank you.

What I would like to suggest to everyone is to dig out your largest bill and shake the veteran's hand, look him or her in the eye, and say a very heartfelt thank you to that brave individual.

Because, after all that he had been through, John Copeland told me that he would, indeed, do it all over again.

Jennifer Clarke-Brophy

Waterdown