St. James trick or treaters put a unique spin on Halloween

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Residents in the east end of Waterdown may notice that the trick-or-treaters are a little bigger this year.

The youth group at St. James United Church have joined forces with youth from across Waterdown, to launch the fifth annual trick-or-treat food drive. Teens will be out in costume, going door-to-door collecting non-perishable food for the Flamborough Food Bank.

The drive usually raises between 50 and 60 boxes of food per year, according to youth minister, Andrew Hyde. The group is hoping to match or better that record.

New this year is a change to the format. Because of the small amount of time, and the huge amount of ground to cover, the band of volunteers have never been able to comb the entire town, leaving many residents wondering why they end the night with a bag of groceries still waiting at the door. To combat that problem, the group will be focusing on the east end - they aim to reach every home east of Hamilton Street. Those on the west end who still wish to participate are asked to drop their donations off at St. James Church on October 30, 31 or November 1.

The event was launched five years ago to give teens, who've passed their trick-or-treating prime, all the fun of the ritual, without any of the guilt.

The drive has built in popularity. Youths from all or no denominations come out, and Hyde has received calls from the Bethel, Grindstone and Freelton church youth groups, who plan to come out.

Homeowners are also getting into the spirit of the event. The first few years required a little education, said Hyde. Homeowners didn't know why they were there, and then had to run to the pantry to dig something up. Now, many have bags or boxes filled and waiting. "If people could do that, that would be great," said Hyde. "We can get to more homes that way."

The group is still in desperate need of many volunteers for the evening. Teens from any or no denomination looking to join in can just show up in costume at 5:30 p.m. on Halloween, at St. James United Church on Parkside Drive. Teams will be sent out shortly after. Volunteers of any age are also needed to stay at the church to collect and sort food and adult volunteers are needed to drive the trick-or-treaters, and cart the food they collect.

The Flamborough Food Bank is gearing up for the Christmas season, and is in need of all non-perishable items.

Canned meat, fruit and vegetables, canned pasta and spaghetti sauce, powdered milk, diapers, sugar, juice, peanut butter, jam and toiletries are always in short supply. School snack items, such as granola bars and juice boxes, are also needed.

St. James trick or treaters put a unique spin on Halloween

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Residents in the east end of Waterdown may notice that the trick-or-treaters are a little bigger this year.

The youth group at St. James United Church have joined forces with youth from across Waterdown, to launch the fifth annual trick-or-treat food drive. Teens will be out in costume, going door-to-door collecting non-perishable food for the Flamborough Food Bank.

The drive usually raises between 50 and 60 boxes of food per year, according to youth minister, Andrew Hyde. The group is hoping to match or better that record.

New this year is a change to the format. Because of the small amount of time, and the huge amount of ground to cover, the band of volunteers have never been able to comb the entire town, leaving many residents wondering why they end the night with a bag of groceries still waiting at the door. To combat that problem, the group will be focusing on the east end - they aim to reach every home east of Hamilton Street. Those on the west end who still wish to participate are asked to drop their donations off at St. James Church on October 30, 31 or November 1.

The event was launched five years ago to give teens, who've passed their trick-or-treating prime, all the fun of the ritual, without any of the guilt.

The drive has built in popularity. Youths from all or no denominations come out, and Hyde has received calls from the Bethel, Grindstone and Freelton church youth groups, who plan to come out.

Homeowners are also getting into the spirit of the event. The first few years required a little education, said Hyde. Homeowners didn't know why they were there, and then had to run to the pantry to dig something up. Now, many have bags or boxes filled and waiting. "If people could do that, that would be great," said Hyde. "We can get to more homes that way."

The group is still in desperate need of many volunteers for the evening. Teens from any or no denomination looking to join in can just show up in costume at 5:30 p.m. on Halloween, at St. James United Church on Parkside Drive. Teams will be sent out shortly after. Volunteers of any age are also needed to stay at the church to collect and sort food and adult volunteers are needed to drive the trick-or-treaters, and cart the food they collect.

The Flamborough Food Bank is gearing up for the Christmas season, and is in need of all non-perishable items.

Canned meat, fruit and vegetables, canned pasta and spaghetti sauce, powdered milk, diapers, sugar, juice, peanut butter, jam and toiletries are always in short supply. School snack items, such as granola bars and juice boxes, are also needed.

St. James trick or treaters put a unique spin on Halloween

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Residents in the east end of Waterdown may notice that the trick-or-treaters are a little bigger this year.

The youth group at St. James United Church have joined forces with youth from across Waterdown, to launch the fifth annual trick-or-treat food drive. Teens will be out in costume, going door-to-door collecting non-perishable food for the Flamborough Food Bank.

The drive usually raises between 50 and 60 boxes of food per year, according to youth minister, Andrew Hyde. The group is hoping to match or better that record.

New this year is a change to the format. Because of the small amount of time, and the huge amount of ground to cover, the band of volunteers have never been able to comb the entire town, leaving many residents wondering why they end the night with a bag of groceries still waiting at the door. To combat that problem, the group will be focusing on the east end - they aim to reach every home east of Hamilton Street. Those on the west end who still wish to participate are asked to drop their donations off at St. James Church on October 30, 31 or November 1.

The event was launched five years ago to give teens, who've passed their trick-or-treating prime, all the fun of the ritual, without any of the guilt.

The drive has built in popularity. Youths from all or no denominations come out, and Hyde has received calls from the Bethel, Grindstone and Freelton church youth groups, who plan to come out.

Homeowners are also getting into the spirit of the event. The first few years required a little education, said Hyde. Homeowners didn't know why they were there, and then had to run to the pantry to dig something up. Now, many have bags or boxes filled and waiting. "If people could do that, that would be great," said Hyde. "We can get to more homes that way."

The group is still in desperate need of many volunteers for the evening. Teens from any or no denomination looking to join in can just show up in costume at 5:30 p.m. on Halloween, at St. James United Church on Parkside Drive. Teams will be sent out shortly after. Volunteers of any age are also needed to stay at the church to collect and sort food and adult volunteers are needed to drive the trick-or-treaters, and cart the food they collect.

The Flamborough Food Bank is gearing up for the Christmas season, and is in need of all non-perishable items.

Canned meat, fruit and vegetables, canned pasta and spaghetti sauce, powdered milk, diapers, sugar, juice, peanut butter, jam and toiletries are always in short supply. School snack items, such as granola bars and juice boxes, are also needed.