Greensville cager proves he's a real Master of the game

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Dennis Woods hasn't quite come back down to earth even two months after returning home with a bronze medal at the World Masters Games in Edmonton.

The 62-year-old basketball player from Greensville is still reveling in the Ontario team's success at the Games which are held for athletes aged 35 and over and have the distinction of being affiliated with the Olympics.

"I work hard and I play hard," said the senior athlete while recalling his participation in what he describes as "a thrill of a lifetime." Feeling fortunate to have been asked to join the Ontario Masters team, Woods said he gave up senior fastball for the season so that he could concentrate on getting ready for basketball competitions at the Games.

The Ontario team, composed of former university and senior basketball players from all parts of Ontario and Eastern Canada, began practicing in January. They met three times a week and continued practicing until the Games were held in late July and early August.

Over 22,000 athletes from 88 countries competed in 27 different sporting events, including volleyball, hockey and swimming. The basketball competitions, all held at the University of Alberta, drew huge crowds, Woods said. "The gym was packed."

Besides the Ontario team, there were competitors from Estonia, Lithuania, Australia, Russia, U.S. Guam and Western Canada.

Competition was stiff and "very physical with a lot of banging going on," Woods said. His team in the 60-64 year age group came up against a lot of "very big men," including one Russian who at 7'1" towered over his opponents.

It took a while for the Ontario team to gel. They lost their first two games but won the next four.

"We played eight games in 12 days. I'm still sore," Woods said with a laugh.

But their efforts paid off and they emerged with a bronze medal, defeating the Australian Myths and Legends team by a healthy margin of 17 points.

Lithuania won the basketball gold, while Russia captured the silver medal. Woods's team almost took second-place honours, but lost to the Russians by just three points.

Woods, who was the team's top scorer in all eight games, said a bronze medal from the World Masters competitions is "a real keeper." He describes his participation in the Worlds as "icing on the cake" and confides, "This was our Olympics and possibly my last opportunity to play at such a high competitive level."

An all-round athlete, Woods has been active in several sports, including football, hockey, fastball and basketball. He continues to play fastball and basketball in local senior recreational leagues.

Athletic prowess runs in the family with his dad, George, having been a marathon runner and his son, Dennis Jr., having played hockey for the Halton Hurricanes out of Milton at the Junior C level.

Woods even managed to combine his 40-year career in the appliance business with basketball. He played on the Westinghouse senior team, which in 1968 made it to the Canadian finals in Montreal. Now working in marketing and sales with Camco in Burlington, he said he works his business trips around his basketball schedule.

He loves the game and the opportunities it gives him to stay fit and travel. He's already planning to join a group of Hamilton area basketball players between the ages of 60 and 70 who want to compete in the World Senior Games in St. George, Utah, next year. And, he said, "It's on the burner" whether he'll take another stab at the World Masters competitions when they're held in Sydney, Australia in 2009. The Australian team told members of the bronze-winning Ontario team that they want "another crack" at them.

Woods would like nothing better.

Greensville cager proves he's a real Master of the game

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Dennis Woods hasn't quite come back down to earth even two months after returning home with a bronze medal at the World Masters Games in Edmonton.

The 62-year-old basketball player from Greensville is still reveling in the Ontario team's success at the Games which are held for athletes aged 35 and over and have the distinction of being affiliated with the Olympics.

"I work hard and I play hard," said the senior athlete while recalling his participation in what he describes as "a thrill of a lifetime." Feeling fortunate to have been asked to join the Ontario Masters team, Woods said he gave up senior fastball for the season so that he could concentrate on getting ready for basketball competitions at the Games.

The Ontario team, composed of former university and senior basketball players from all parts of Ontario and Eastern Canada, began practicing in January. They met three times a week and continued practicing until the Games were held in late July and early August.

Over 22,000 athletes from 88 countries competed in 27 different sporting events, including volleyball, hockey and swimming. The basketball competitions, all held at the University of Alberta, drew huge crowds, Woods said. "The gym was packed."

Besides the Ontario team, there were competitors from Estonia, Lithuania, Australia, Russia, U.S. Guam and Western Canada.

Competition was stiff and "very physical with a lot of banging going on," Woods said. His team in the 60-64 year age group came up against a lot of "very big men," including one Russian who at 7'1" towered over his opponents.

It took a while for the Ontario team to gel. They lost their first two games but won the next four.

"We played eight games in 12 days. I'm still sore," Woods said with a laugh.

But their efforts paid off and they emerged with a bronze medal, defeating the Australian Myths and Legends team by a healthy margin of 17 points.

Lithuania won the basketball gold, while Russia captured the silver medal. Woods's team almost took second-place honours, but lost to the Russians by just three points.

Woods, who was the team's top scorer in all eight games, said a bronze medal from the World Masters competitions is "a real keeper." He describes his participation in the Worlds as "icing on the cake" and confides, "This was our Olympics and possibly my last opportunity to play at such a high competitive level."

An all-round athlete, Woods has been active in several sports, including football, hockey, fastball and basketball. He continues to play fastball and basketball in local senior recreational leagues.

Athletic prowess runs in the family with his dad, George, having been a marathon runner and his son, Dennis Jr., having played hockey for the Halton Hurricanes out of Milton at the Junior C level.

Woods even managed to combine his 40-year career in the appliance business with basketball. He played on the Westinghouse senior team, which in 1968 made it to the Canadian finals in Montreal. Now working in marketing and sales with Camco in Burlington, he said he works his business trips around his basketball schedule.

He loves the game and the opportunities it gives him to stay fit and travel. He's already planning to join a group of Hamilton area basketball players between the ages of 60 and 70 who want to compete in the World Senior Games in St. George, Utah, next year. And, he said, "It's on the burner" whether he'll take another stab at the World Masters competitions when they're held in Sydney, Australia in 2009. The Australian team told members of the bronze-winning Ontario team that they want "another crack" at them.

Woods would like nothing better.

Greensville cager proves he's a real Master of the game

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Dennis Woods hasn't quite come back down to earth even two months after returning home with a bronze medal at the World Masters Games in Edmonton.

The 62-year-old basketball player from Greensville is still reveling in the Ontario team's success at the Games which are held for athletes aged 35 and over and have the distinction of being affiliated with the Olympics.

"I work hard and I play hard," said the senior athlete while recalling his participation in what he describes as "a thrill of a lifetime." Feeling fortunate to have been asked to join the Ontario Masters team, Woods said he gave up senior fastball for the season so that he could concentrate on getting ready for basketball competitions at the Games.

The Ontario team, composed of former university and senior basketball players from all parts of Ontario and Eastern Canada, began practicing in January. They met three times a week and continued practicing until the Games were held in late July and early August.

Over 22,000 athletes from 88 countries competed in 27 different sporting events, including volleyball, hockey and swimming. The basketball competitions, all held at the University of Alberta, drew huge crowds, Woods said. "The gym was packed."

Besides the Ontario team, there were competitors from Estonia, Lithuania, Australia, Russia, U.S. Guam and Western Canada.

Competition was stiff and "very physical with a lot of banging going on," Woods said. His team in the 60-64 year age group came up against a lot of "very big men," including one Russian who at 7'1" towered over his opponents.

It took a while for the Ontario team to gel. They lost their first two games but won the next four.

"We played eight games in 12 days. I'm still sore," Woods said with a laugh.

But their efforts paid off and they emerged with a bronze medal, defeating the Australian Myths and Legends team by a healthy margin of 17 points.

Lithuania won the basketball gold, while Russia captured the silver medal. Woods's team almost took second-place honours, but lost to the Russians by just three points.

Woods, who was the team's top scorer in all eight games, said a bronze medal from the World Masters competitions is "a real keeper." He describes his participation in the Worlds as "icing on the cake" and confides, "This was our Olympics and possibly my last opportunity to play at such a high competitive level."

An all-round athlete, Woods has been active in several sports, including football, hockey, fastball and basketball. He continues to play fastball and basketball in local senior recreational leagues.

Athletic prowess runs in the family with his dad, George, having been a marathon runner and his son, Dennis Jr., having played hockey for the Halton Hurricanes out of Milton at the Junior C level.

Woods even managed to combine his 40-year career in the appliance business with basketball. He played on the Westinghouse senior team, which in 1968 made it to the Canadian finals in Montreal. Now working in marketing and sales with Camco in Burlington, he said he works his business trips around his basketball schedule.

He loves the game and the opportunities it gives him to stay fit and travel. He's already planning to join a group of Hamilton area basketball players between the ages of 60 and 70 who want to compete in the World Senior Games in St. George, Utah, next year. And, he said, "It's on the burner" whether he'll take another stab at the World Masters competitions when they're held in Sydney, Australia in 2009. The Australian team told members of the bronze-winning Ontario team that they want "another crack" at them.

Woods would like nothing better.