Gentlemen, check your closets

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Flamborough and area men are being encouraged to rummage through their closets for good, useable clothing that can be donated to local homeless men.

Waterdown resident Tom Norris, who helped organize the Helping Hands Street Mission with his wife Helen about two years ago, said there's a desperate need for men's clothing this fall. In fact, "We have none," he confided, noting that there always seems to be a good supply of women's and children's clothing available at the Helping Hands store in downtown Hamilton, but it's a totally different story where men's clothing is concerned.

To deal with the shortage, a men's only clothing drive will be held next Saturday (November 12) at Memorial Park in Waterdown. A tent will be set up as a drop-off point, with donations being accepted from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

Norris, who is coordinating the drive, said everything is needed. Coats, boots, shirts, pants, shoes, work clothes, coveralls and work boots are all required. Sleeping bags, blankest and socks will also be accepted.

"We see more men this time of the year," Norris explained. "There's really a huge need."

While acknowledging that men are less likely than women to look through their closets in search of old clothing, Norris said they could see it as a bit of a competition.

"The girls are challenging the guys," he said. Speaking from personal experience, he added, "I can certainly say you get more out of giving than holding on to clothing that you no longer use."

The Socks for Santa campaign that was launched by Helping Hands volunteers last year during Waterdown's annual Santa Claus Parade has branched out this year with the help of the Flamborough Family YMCA. A large Christmas tree has been set up at the Y on Parkside Drive and members and visitors are welcome to drop off their sock donations over the next three weeks.

More socks will be collected by volunteer elves that will walk the parade route, November 26. Last year, 690 pairs were collected; some parade-goers even took the socks off their feet to support the project. The socks of assorted sizes, colours and materials were all given to the needy and homeless in the Hamilton area.

Among those volunteering their help with next weekend's clothing drive are the Men of Grindstone (MOG) from the Grindstone Valley Bible Church. Ken Drummond is spearheading the church group's involvement in the project.

The Helping Hands Street Mission continues to look for volunteers who can help with its projects, including Friday night visits to Salvation Army mobile soup kitchen locations in downtown Hamilton where mission volunteers hand out free clothing to street people.

Also, volunteers are needed to staff the Helping Hands store at 349 Barton Street East. Opened last February, the store serves as a distribution centre for donated clothes that are given to the needy and homeless. It is open from 1 to 4 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and serves about 30 to 40 people each day. Norris said long-range plans include getting sufficient funds and volunteer staffing support to have the store open five days a week.

Right now, the focus is on the upcoming clothing drive in Memorial Park. Norris is hopeful there'll be a big response in answer to a big need.

Gentlemen, check your closets

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Flamborough and area men are being encouraged to rummage through their closets for good, useable clothing that can be donated to local homeless men.

Waterdown resident Tom Norris, who helped organize the Helping Hands Street Mission with his wife Helen about two years ago, said there's a desperate need for men's clothing this fall. In fact, "We have none," he confided, noting that there always seems to be a good supply of women's and children's clothing available at the Helping Hands store in downtown Hamilton, but it's a totally different story where men's clothing is concerned.

To deal with the shortage, a men's only clothing drive will be held next Saturday (November 12) at Memorial Park in Waterdown. A tent will be set up as a drop-off point, with donations being accepted from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

Norris, who is coordinating the drive, said everything is needed. Coats, boots, shirts, pants, shoes, work clothes, coveralls and work boots are all required. Sleeping bags, blankest and socks will also be accepted.

"We see more men this time of the year," Norris explained. "There's really a huge need."

While acknowledging that men are less likely than women to look through their closets in search of old clothing, Norris said they could see it as a bit of a competition.

"The girls are challenging the guys," he said. Speaking from personal experience, he added, "I can certainly say you get more out of giving than holding on to clothing that you no longer use."

The Socks for Santa campaign that was launched by Helping Hands volunteers last year during Waterdown's annual Santa Claus Parade has branched out this year with the help of the Flamborough Family YMCA. A large Christmas tree has been set up at the Y on Parkside Drive and members and visitors are welcome to drop off their sock donations over the next three weeks.

More socks will be collected by volunteer elves that will walk the parade route, November 26. Last year, 690 pairs were collected; some parade-goers even took the socks off their feet to support the project. The socks of assorted sizes, colours and materials were all given to the needy and homeless in the Hamilton area.

Among those volunteering their help with next weekend's clothing drive are the Men of Grindstone (MOG) from the Grindstone Valley Bible Church. Ken Drummond is spearheading the church group's involvement in the project.

The Helping Hands Street Mission continues to look for volunteers who can help with its projects, including Friday night visits to Salvation Army mobile soup kitchen locations in downtown Hamilton where mission volunteers hand out free clothing to street people.

Also, volunteers are needed to staff the Helping Hands store at 349 Barton Street East. Opened last February, the store serves as a distribution centre for donated clothes that are given to the needy and homeless. It is open from 1 to 4 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and serves about 30 to 40 people each day. Norris said long-range plans include getting sufficient funds and volunteer staffing support to have the store open five days a week.

Right now, the focus is on the upcoming clothing drive in Memorial Park. Norris is hopeful there'll be a big response in answer to a big need.

Gentlemen, check your closets

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Flamborough and area men are being encouraged to rummage through their closets for good, useable clothing that can be donated to local homeless men.

Waterdown resident Tom Norris, who helped organize the Helping Hands Street Mission with his wife Helen about two years ago, said there's a desperate need for men's clothing this fall. In fact, "We have none," he confided, noting that there always seems to be a good supply of women's and children's clothing available at the Helping Hands store in downtown Hamilton, but it's a totally different story where men's clothing is concerned.

To deal with the shortage, a men's only clothing drive will be held next Saturday (November 12) at Memorial Park in Waterdown. A tent will be set up as a drop-off point, with donations being accepted from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

Norris, who is coordinating the drive, said everything is needed. Coats, boots, shirts, pants, shoes, work clothes, coveralls and work boots are all required. Sleeping bags, blankest and socks will also be accepted.

"We see more men this time of the year," Norris explained. "There's really a huge need."

While acknowledging that men are less likely than women to look through their closets in search of old clothing, Norris said they could see it as a bit of a competition.

"The girls are challenging the guys," he said. Speaking from personal experience, he added, "I can certainly say you get more out of giving than holding on to clothing that you no longer use."

The Socks for Santa campaign that was launched by Helping Hands volunteers last year during Waterdown's annual Santa Claus Parade has branched out this year with the help of the Flamborough Family YMCA. A large Christmas tree has been set up at the Y on Parkside Drive and members and visitors are welcome to drop off their sock donations over the next three weeks.

More socks will be collected by volunteer elves that will walk the parade route, November 26. Last year, 690 pairs were collected; some parade-goers even took the socks off their feet to support the project. The socks of assorted sizes, colours and materials were all given to the needy and homeless in the Hamilton area.

Among those volunteering their help with next weekend's clothing drive are the Men of Grindstone (MOG) from the Grindstone Valley Bible Church. Ken Drummond is spearheading the church group's involvement in the project.

The Helping Hands Street Mission continues to look for volunteers who can help with its projects, including Friday night visits to Salvation Army mobile soup kitchen locations in downtown Hamilton where mission volunteers hand out free clothing to street people.

Also, volunteers are needed to staff the Helping Hands store at 349 Barton Street East. Opened last February, the store serves as a distribution centre for donated clothes that are given to the needy and homeless. It is open from 1 to 4 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and serves about 30 to 40 people each day. Norris said long-range plans include getting sufficient funds and volunteer staffing support to have the store open five days a week.

Right now, the focus is on the upcoming clothing drive in Memorial Park. Norris is hopeful there'll be a big response in answer to a big need.