Vote on the future fate of Flamborough at CFF town hall meeting

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Organizers of next Wednesday's town hall meeting at Millgrove Community Centre are hoping for a full house. The Committee to Free Flamborough (CFF) has billed the meeting as an opportunity for residents to have their say about the future of Flamborough.

Ballots outlining three restructuring options will be distributed to all guests, who will be asked to select the proposal that they feel the CFF should pursue. The restructuring proposals are:

Breaking up Flamborough into three pieces with East Flamborough becoming part of the City of Burlington, the northwest corner joining the Township of North Dumfries and the Region of Waterloo, and the remainder merging with the County of Brant.

De-amalgamating Flamborough, Ancaster and Dundas from Hamilton and merging the three suburban communities into one municipality called Wentworth.

Separating Flamborough from Hamilton and creating a stand-alone community.

The ballot also contains a box for residents who feel Flamborough should give up the idea of de-amalgamation.

Dennis Noonan, a Sheffield resident and spokesman for the CFF, said the group decided to hold a vote on the issue after meeting with a representative of Municipal Affairs Minister John Gerretsen, who suggested that the group, in its quest for de-amalgamation, should be ready to offer an alternative form of government. When the votes are tallied, the CFF will pursue the form of government identified by the majority, Noonan said. The group plans to present the desired restructuring option to officials at Queen's Park.

If there is a low turnout at next week's meeting, the ballot will be put on the group's website at www.freeflamborough.org and/or published in the Flamborough Review.

Among presentations planned for the Millgrove meeting is a detailed analysis of Flamborough's tax contributions to the City of Hamilton and what Flamborough gets in return. CFF chair Roman Sarachman has collected a mountain of data, much of it from the city's website, and will show that Hamilton is spending more money in the city than in its five suburban municipalities.

Sarachman says Flamborough residents are suffering from "a double hit," not only facing higher tax increases than other city residents but also being hit with higher property assessments which further drive up their taxes.

"Before amalgamation, it took 17 years for the taxes to double. After amalgamation, taxes will double by 2010 and triple by 2018 assuming we will see a 2.5 per cent increase in assessment and a 2.5 per cent mill rate increase yearly."

If Flamborough remains a part of Hamilton, Sarachman said it's time for representation of the area at city council to be increased. Geographically, Flamborough is just 700 acres smaller than the rest of the "new" city combined, he noted. Based on size alone, Flamborough should have four councillors, rather than two, he argued.

Other topics on Wednesday night's agenda include lack of accountability, loss of local control, fiscal mismanagement, unfair tax increases and declining services in Flamborough. Ward 15/Flamborough Councilor Margaret McCarthy and Ward 14/Wentworth Councilor Dave Braden are expected to attend and address the crowd. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m.

Vote on the future fate of Flamborough at CFF town hall meeting

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Organizers of next Wednesday's town hall meeting at Millgrove Community Centre are hoping for a full house. The Committee to Free Flamborough (CFF) has billed the meeting as an opportunity for residents to have their say about the future of Flamborough.

Ballots outlining three restructuring options will be distributed to all guests, who will be asked to select the proposal that they feel the CFF should pursue. The restructuring proposals are:

Breaking up Flamborough into three pieces with East Flamborough becoming part of the City of Burlington, the northwest corner joining the Township of North Dumfries and the Region of Waterloo, and the remainder merging with the County of Brant.

De-amalgamating Flamborough, Ancaster and Dundas from Hamilton and merging the three suburban communities into one municipality called Wentworth.

Separating Flamborough from Hamilton and creating a stand-alone community.

The ballot also contains a box for residents who feel Flamborough should give up the idea of de-amalgamation.

Dennis Noonan, a Sheffield resident and spokesman for the CFF, said the group decided to hold a vote on the issue after meeting with a representative of Municipal Affairs Minister John Gerretsen, who suggested that the group, in its quest for de-amalgamation, should be ready to offer an alternative form of government. When the votes are tallied, the CFF will pursue the form of government identified by the majority, Noonan said. The group plans to present the desired restructuring option to officials at Queen's Park.

If there is a low turnout at next week's meeting, the ballot will be put on the group's website at www.freeflamborough.org and/or published in the Flamborough Review.

Among presentations planned for the Millgrove meeting is a detailed analysis of Flamborough's tax contributions to the City of Hamilton and what Flamborough gets in return. CFF chair Roman Sarachman has collected a mountain of data, much of it from the city's website, and will show that Hamilton is spending more money in the city than in its five suburban municipalities.

Sarachman says Flamborough residents are suffering from "a double hit," not only facing higher tax increases than other city residents but also being hit with higher property assessments which further drive up their taxes.

"Before amalgamation, it took 17 years for the taxes to double. After amalgamation, taxes will double by 2010 and triple by 2018 assuming we will see a 2.5 per cent increase in assessment and a 2.5 per cent mill rate increase yearly."

If Flamborough remains a part of Hamilton, Sarachman said it's time for representation of the area at city council to be increased. Geographically, Flamborough is just 700 acres smaller than the rest of the "new" city combined, he noted. Based on size alone, Flamborough should have four councillors, rather than two, he argued.

Other topics on Wednesday night's agenda include lack of accountability, loss of local control, fiscal mismanagement, unfair tax increases and declining services in Flamborough. Ward 15/Flamborough Councilor Margaret McCarthy and Ward 14/Wentworth Councilor Dave Braden are expected to attend and address the crowd. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m.

Vote on the future fate of Flamborough at CFF town hall meeting

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Organizers of next Wednesday's town hall meeting at Millgrove Community Centre are hoping for a full house. The Committee to Free Flamborough (CFF) has billed the meeting as an opportunity for residents to have their say about the future of Flamborough.

Ballots outlining three restructuring options will be distributed to all guests, who will be asked to select the proposal that they feel the CFF should pursue. The restructuring proposals are:

Breaking up Flamborough into three pieces with East Flamborough becoming part of the City of Burlington, the northwest corner joining the Township of North Dumfries and the Region of Waterloo, and the remainder merging with the County of Brant.

De-amalgamating Flamborough, Ancaster and Dundas from Hamilton and merging the three suburban communities into one municipality called Wentworth.

Separating Flamborough from Hamilton and creating a stand-alone community.

The ballot also contains a box for residents who feel Flamborough should give up the idea of de-amalgamation.

Dennis Noonan, a Sheffield resident and spokesman for the CFF, said the group decided to hold a vote on the issue after meeting with a representative of Municipal Affairs Minister John Gerretsen, who suggested that the group, in its quest for de-amalgamation, should be ready to offer an alternative form of government. When the votes are tallied, the CFF will pursue the form of government identified by the majority, Noonan said. The group plans to present the desired restructuring option to officials at Queen's Park.

If there is a low turnout at next week's meeting, the ballot will be put on the group's website at www.freeflamborough.org and/or published in the Flamborough Review.

Among presentations planned for the Millgrove meeting is a detailed analysis of Flamborough's tax contributions to the City of Hamilton and what Flamborough gets in return. CFF chair Roman Sarachman has collected a mountain of data, much of it from the city's website, and will show that Hamilton is spending more money in the city than in its five suburban municipalities.

Sarachman says Flamborough residents are suffering from "a double hit," not only facing higher tax increases than other city residents but also being hit with higher property assessments which further drive up their taxes.

"Before amalgamation, it took 17 years for the taxes to double. After amalgamation, taxes will double by 2010 and triple by 2018 assuming we will see a 2.5 per cent increase in assessment and a 2.5 per cent mill rate increase yearly."

If Flamborough remains a part of Hamilton, Sarachman said it's time for representation of the area at city council to be increased. Geographically, Flamborough is just 700 acres smaller than the rest of the "new" city combined, he noted. Based on size alone, Flamborough should have four councillors, rather than two, he argued.

Other topics on Wednesday night's agenda include lack of accountability, loss of local control, fiscal mismanagement, unfair tax increases and declining services in Flamborough. Ward 15/Flamborough Councilor Margaret McCarthy and Ward 14/Wentworth Councilor Dave Braden are expected to attend and address the crowd. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m.