Author and nutritional researcher in town to deliver wake-up call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Brad King wants people to act their age.

More accurately, the nutritional researcher and author wants people to feel their age. And that's the message he'll spread when he comes to speak at the Waterdown Legion.

"The majority of the population sails at half mast, and they tell themselves that it's the 'inevitability of aging,'" King noted in an interview with the Review. "We learn to live with less than optimal energy. Don't expect downward inevitability; it doesn't have to be that way."

King, whose local appearance has been organized by The Vitamin Store, appeared in Waterdown a few years ago, to promote a previous book, one of a series entitled Fat Wars. He doesn't regret the title, but concedes it may be a bit of a misnomer.

"I never really intended Fat Wars just to be about obesity," he stressed. "I've always written about fat loss and metabolism, and how and why the majority of the population has the propensity to store as much fat as they do."

King's new volume, Awaken Your Metabolism, compactly written into a svelte 180 or so pages, explores cellular interactions in the body - not just involving food, but also hormones and antioxidants. The book also chronicles the impact of elements such as sleep, exercise and lifestyle on energy levels.

"We have to learn how things work, and we can do that often by taking simple steps," said King, noting that many of the principles he counted on in his role as a sports nutritionist can apply to the average person.

"Anybody can use more energy," he noted. "There are many ways people can enhance their energy profile, by doing a fraction of what elite athletes do. Athletes can also benefit from the information in the book."

While some of the language may seem complex to the layperson, King insists it's not to anyone's benefit for him to talk down to his audience.

"I don't like to talk down to people, I like to educate. This is a layman-friendly book," he said. "It's important to use proper terms, and to make sure (the reader) knows that it means, so they can navigate for themselves."

Learning how things work, he adds, means taking some simple steps, such as:

Drinking more water. "Why? The body is comprised of 70 per cent water, not pop or coffee," said King. "Energy is produced, along with that water."

Quality of exercise. "Exercise right, learn to move effectively," the author advises. "Exercise should not be looked upon as a chore; it should be looked upon as something that makes you feel better." Cardio, he adds, is not enough; to stave off degenerative conditions such as osteoporosis, weight-bearing activities should also be included.

Embrace your food. "Eating - we should be embracing it and eating at regular intervals the right kinds of macro-nutrients," said King.

King stresses that obesity is the by-product the body is left with if the body's metabolic function is damaged. "Aging is our bodies' ability to keep up with the wear and tear of everyday living; once you lose the metabolic advantage - that's when we age," he said. "Can it be reversed? To a certain extent, absolutely.

"If we're 50, we don't have to act like today's 50-year-old, that acts like a 70-year-old," he continued. "It doesn't really matter how many candles are on people's birthday cakes anymore."

King will speak at the Waterdown Legion on Monday November 7, from 7-8:30 p.m. There is no cost to attend, but those interested should register at the Vitamin Store, 255 Dundas Street East. 905-690-8383.

Author and nutritional researcher in town to deliver wake-up call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Brad King wants people to act their age.

More accurately, the nutritional researcher and author wants people to feel their age. And that's the message he'll spread when he comes to speak at the Waterdown Legion.

"The majority of the population sails at half mast, and they tell themselves that it's the 'inevitability of aging,'" King noted in an interview with the Review. "We learn to live with less than optimal energy. Don't expect downward inevitability; it doesn't have to be that way."

King, whose local appearance has been organized by The Vitamin Store, appeared in Waterdown a few years ago, to promote a previous book, one of a series entitled Fat Wars. He doesn't regret the title, but concedes it may be a bit of a misnomer.

"I never really intended Fat Wars just to be about obesity," he stressed. "I've always written about fat loss and metabolism, and how and why the majority of the population has the propensity to store as much fat as they do."

King's new volume, Awaken Your Metabolism, compactly written into a svelte 180 or so pages, explores cellular interactions in the body - not just involving food, but also hormones and antioxidants. The book also chronicles the impact of elements such as sleep, exercise and lifestyle on energy levels.

"We have to learn how things work, and we can do that often by taking simple steps," said King, noting that many of the principles he counted on in his role as a sports nutritionist can apply to the average person.

"Anybody can use more energy," he noted. "There are many ways people can enhance their energy profile, by doing a fraction of what elite athletes do. Athletes can also benefit from the information in the book."

While some of the language may seem complex to the layperson, King insists it's not to anyone's benefit for him to talk down to his audience.

"I don't like to talk down to people, I like to educate. This is a layman-friendly book," he said. "It's important to use proper terms, and to make sure (the reader) knows that it means, so they can navigate for themselves."

Learning how things work, he adds, means taking some simple steps, such as:

Drinking more water. "Why? The body is comprised of 70 per cent water, not pop or coffee," said King. "Energy is produced, along with that water."

Quality of exercise. "Exercise right, learn to move effectively," the author advises. "Exercise should not be looked upon as a chore; it should be looked upon as something that makes you feel better." Cardio, he adds, is not enough; to stave off degenerative conditions such as osteoporosis, weight-bearing activities should also be included.

Embrace your food. "Eating - we should be embracing it and eating at regular intervals the right kinds of macro-nutrients," said King.

King stresses that obesity is the by-product the body is left with if the body's metabolic function is damaged. "Aging is our bodies' ability to keep up with the wear and tear of everyday living; once you lose the metabolic advantage - that's when we age," he said. "Can it be reversed? To a certain extent, absolutely.

"If we're 50, we don't have to act like today's 50-year-old, that acts like a 70-year-old," he continued. "It doesn't really matter how many candles are on people's birthday cakes anymore."

King will speak at the Waterdown Legion on Monday November 7, from 7-8:30 p.m. There is no cost to attend, but those interested should register at the Vitamin Store, 255 Dundas Street East. 905-690-8383.

Author and nutritional researcher in town to deliver wake-up call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Brad King wants people to act their age.

More accurately, the nutritional researcher and author wants people to feel their age. And that's the message he'll spread when he comes to speak at the Waterdown Legion.

"The majority of the population sails at half mast, and they tell themselves that it's the 'inevitability of aging,'" King noted in an interview with the Review. "We learn to live with less than optimal energy. Don't expect downward inevitability; it doesn't have to be that way."

King, whose local appearance has been organized by The Vitamin Store, appeared in Waterdown a few years ago, to promote a previous book, one of a series entitled Fat Wars. He doesn't regret the title, but concedes it may be a bit of a misnomer.

"I never really intended Fat Wars just to be about obesity," he stressed. "I've always written about fat loss and metabolism, and how and why the majority of the population has the propensity to store as much fat as they do."

King's new volume, Awaken Your Metabolism, compactly written into a svelte 180 or so pages, explores cellular interactions in the body - not just involving food, but also hormones and antioxidants. The book also chronicles the impact of elements such as sleep, exercise and lifestyle on energy levels.

"We have to learn how things work, and we can do that often by taking simple steps," said King, noting that many of the principles he counted on in his role as a sports nutritionist can apply to the average person.

"Anybody can use more energy," he noted. "There are many ways people can enhance their energy profile, by doing a fraction of what elite athletes do. Athletes can also benefit from the information in the book."

While some of the language may seem complex to the layperson, King insists it's not to anyone's benefit for him to talk down to his audience.

"I don't like to talk down to people, I like to educate. This is a layman-friendly book," he said. "It's important to use proper terms, and to make sure (the reader) knows that it means, so they can navigate for themselves."

Learning how things work, he adds, means taking some simple steps, such as:

Drinking more water. "Why? The body is comprised of 70 per cent water, not pop or coffee," said King. "Energy is produced, along with that water."

Quality of exercise. "Exercise right, learn to move effectively," the author advises. "Exercise should not be looked upon as a chore; it should be looked upon as something that makes you feel better." Cardio, he adds, is not enough; to stave off degenerative conditions such as osteoporosis, weight-bearing activities should also be included.

Embrace your food. "Eating - we should be embracing it and eating at regular intervals the right kinds of macro-nutrients," said King.

King stresses that obesity is the by-product the body is left with if the body's metabolic function is damaged. "Aging is our bodies' ability to keep up with the wear and tear of everyday living; once you lose the metabolic advantage - that's when we age," he said. "Can it be reversed? To a certain extent, absolutely.

"If we're 50, we don't have to act like today's 50-year-old, that acts like a 70-year-old," he continued. "It doesn't really matter how many candles are on people's birthday cakes anymore."

King will speak at the Waterdown Legion on Monday November 7, from 7-8:30 p.m. There is no cost to attend, but those interested should register at the Vitamin Store, 255 Dundas Street East. 905-690-8383.