Thank you.

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Every day is Remembrance Day for Harry Knowles. The Second World War veteran says not a day goes by that he doesn't remember the supreme sacrifice made by many Canadian servicemen.

"I remember every day," he said solemnly.

Every November 11, thousands of other Canadians join him in paying tribute to the fallen as they gather around memorials outside Legion Halls and in town squares. Harry, now in his 88th year, cannot remember ever having missed a Remembrance Day ceremony since returning home after six years of combat in Italy and Europe as a member of the Fifth Division of the Canadian Army.

"I don't like to talk much about it," he said of his war experiences, echoing the words of so many veterans.

What he does like is the resurgence of interest in Remembrance Day ceremonies in recent years, particularly in the schools.

Every Remembrance Day for the past four years, Harry wakes early, gets dressed in his Legion uniform with its two bars of medals, and drives to Millgrove to attend special ceremonies at Millgrove Public School.

"It's just a matter of being there. I don't have to say much. The children just like to see a veteran and they all want to shake my hand," he said.

The school ceremony is arranged for early morning to allow Harry enough time to drive back to Lynden for Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Legion Hall.

He generally talks to the children about the importance of Remembrance Day and wearing a poppy. And he always reminds the youngsters that when they see someone wearing two poppies, that means that the wearer is a veteran and they should "go up and shake his hand and say, 'Thank you.'"

This year, Harry has agreed to do another school visit on Remembrance Day. He'll attend a flag-raising at Lee Academy, a private school just down the road from his home on 2nd Concession Road West.

Harry and his war bride wife, Doris, who he met at a dance in Wales, have lived in Lynden since the winter of 1947. They rented a house in the village before building their present home in 1957 under the Veterans Land Act. On October 20, they celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary and on Wednesday of this week, they marked Doris's birthday.

Harry has been active in the community for over 50 years. He has a 60-year pin from the Lynden Branch of the Legion, which he has served in many capacities, including a 25-year stint as secretary-treasurer, 20 years as a welfare officer and 25 years as a poppy seller. He even filled in as padre for Legion members one year when no one else was available. He was given a life membership in the branch in 1978.

A 35-year member of the Lynden Lions Club, he was recognized for his active involvement in community activities with the service club's Citizen of the Year award in 1978.

While there have been many occasions that have pulled at his heartstrings, including a trip to Juno Beach in France three years ago and a visit to Italy last spring, none can compare with the emotions that surface every Remembrance Day. When the moment of silence is held to remember fallen comrades, Harry's reaction is the same even 60 years after the end of the Second World War.

"That's when I shed a tear. I lost a lot of buddies overseas."

Thank you.

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Every day is Remembrance Day for Harry Knowles. The Second World War veteran says not a day goes by that he doesn't remember the supreme sacrifice made by many Canadian servicemen.

"I remember every day," he said solemnly.

Every November 11, thousands of other Canadians join him in paying tribute to the fallen as they gather around memorials outside Legion Halls and in town squares. Harry, now in his 88th year, cannot remember ever having missed a Remembrance Day ceremony since returning home after six years of combat in Italy and Europe as a member of the Fifth Division of the Canadian Army.

"I don't like to talk much about it," he said of his war experiences, echoing the words of so many veterans.

What he does like is the resurgence of interest in Remembrance Day ceremonies in recent years, particularly in the schools.

Every Remembrance Day for the past four years, Harry wakes early, gets dressed in his Legion uniform with its two bars of medals, and drives to Millgrove to attend special ceremonies at Millgrove Public School.

"It's just a matter of being there. I don't have to say much. The children just like to see a veteran and they all want to shake my hand," he said.

The school ceremony is arranged for early morning to allow Harry enough time to drive back to Lynden for Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Legion Hall.

He generally talks to the children about the importance of Remembrance Day and wearing a poppy. And he always reminds the youngsters that when they see someone wearing two poppies, that means that the wearer is a veteran and they should "go up and shake his hand and say, 'Thank you.'"

This year, Harry has agreed to do another school visit on Remembrance Day. He'll attend a flag-raising at Lee Academy, a private school just down the road from his home on 2nd Concession Road West.

Harry and his war bride wife, Doris, who he met at a dance in Wales, have lived in Lynden since the winter of 1947. They rented a house in the village before building their present home in 1957 under the Veterans Land Act. On October 20, they celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary and on Wednesday of this week, they marked Doris's birthday.

Harry has been active in the community for over 50 years. He has a 60-year pin from the Lynden Branch of the Legion, which he has served in many capacities, including a 25-year stint as secretary-treasurer, 20 years as a welfare officer and 25 years as a poppy seller. He even filled in as padre for Legion members one year when no one else was available. He was given a life membership in the branch in 1978.

A 35-year member of the Lynden Lions Club, he was recognized for his active involvement in community activities with the service club's Citizen of the Year award in 1978.

While there have been many occasions that have pulled at his heartstrings, including a trip to Juno Beach in France three years ago and a visit to Italy last spring, none can compare with the emotions that surface every Remembrance Day. When the moment of silence is held to remember fallen comrades, Harry's reaction is the same even 60 years after the end of the Second World War.

"That's when I shed a tear. I lost a lot of buddies overseas."

Thank you.

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Every day is Remembrance Day for Harry Knowles. The Second World War veteran says not a day goes by that he doesn't remember the supreme sacrifice made by many Canadian servicemen.

"I remember every day," he said solemnly.

Every November 11, thousands of other Canadians join him in paying tribute to the fallen as they gather around memorials outside Legion Halls and in town squares. Harry, now in his 88th year, cannot remember ever having missed a Remembrance Day ceremony since returning home after six years of combat in Italy and Europe as a member of the Fifth Division of the Canadian Army.

"I don't like to talk much about it," he said of his war experiences, echoing the words of so many veterans.

What he does like is the resurgence of interest in Remembrance Day ceremonies in recent years, particularly in the schools.

Every Remembrance Day for the past four years, Harry wakes early, gets dressed in his Legion uniform with its two bars of medals, and drives to Millgrove to attend special ceremonies at Millgrove Public School.

"It's just a matter of being there. I don't have to say much. The children just like to see a veteran and they all want to shake my hand," he said.

The school ceremony is arranged for early morning to allow Harry enough time to drive back to Lynden for Remembrance Day ceremonies at the Legion Hall.

He generally talks to the children about the importance of Remembrance Day and wearing a poppy. And he always reminds the youngsters that when they see someone wearing two poppies, that means that the wearer is a veteran and they should "go up and shake his hand and say, 'Thank you.'"

This year, Harry has agreed to do another school visit on Remembrance Day. He'll attend a flag-raising at Lee Academy, a private school just down the road from his home on 2nd Concession Road West.

Harry and his war bride wife, Doris, who he met at a dance in Wales, have lived in Lynden since the winter of 1947. They rented a house in the village before building their present home in 1957 under the Veterans Land Act. On October 20, they celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary and on Wednesday of this week, they marked Doris's birthday.

Harry has been active in the community for over 50 years. He has a 60-year pin from the Lynden Branch of the Legion, which he has served in many capacities, including a 25-year stint as secretary-treasurer, 20 years as a welfare officer and 25 years as a poppy seller. He even filled in as padre for Legion members one year when no one else was available. He was given a life membership in the branch in 1978.

A 35-year member of the Lynden Lions Club, he was recognized for his active involvement in community activities with the service club's Citizen of the Year award in 1978.

While there have been many occasions that have pulled at his heartstrings, including a trip to Juno Beach in France three years ago and a visit to Italy last spring, none can compare with the emotions that surface every Remembrance Day. When the moment of silence is held to remember fallen comrades, Harry's reaction is the same even 60 years after the end of the Second World War.

"That's when I shed a tear. I lost a lot of buddies overseas."