Bypassing a simple misnomer

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Bypass (n.) -a way, path, etc. between two points that avoids or is auxiliary to the main way; specifically, an alternative highway route, as for skirting an urban area.

That's the definition of bypass in the Webster's dictionary. To me, it sounds blatantly simple, but I'm a journalist, not an engineer, so I tend to look at the meaning of the word as something which will be followed to the letter when that word materializes into something concrete in grand transportation schemes. Such is not the case with the Waterdown/Aldershot Transportation Master Plan.

I can only shake my head, along with several area residents along Parkside Drive, when engineers of this grand plan refer to the proposed east-west corridor as a bypass. It's a complete misnomer. Why? Because the proposed route doesn't skirt the urban area. It's barely a stone's throw away from Parkside Drive, it travels just north of a proposed subdivision behind the Waterdown District High School and eventually connects with the east section of Parkside Drive near Churchill Avenue - all of which are very much a part of urban Waterdown.

How can that be a bypass? Bypasses are meant to move traffic around congested urban areas, not add to the traffic in the urban core. They're supposed to ease that traffic by taking it around the core. What's difficult about that concept?

Residents in the area are starting to question the engineers of this plan. I am, too. If they want to call the proposed route an 'east-west corridor,' then so be it. But don't try to pass it off as a bypass. It just doesn't fit the definition.

More than that, for many residents in the area, the plan defies logic. Who is going to follow a dogleg route, that zigs and zags through several residential streets?

The truth is we don't need any more road problems in Waterdown. We have quite enough, thank you. What we need are solutions to the gridlock that is becoming worse with each passing day.

A Master Transportation Plan should come up with creative solutions, not a convenient one that many residents suspect is driven by pressure from developers. It's time for cool heads to prevail. It's time for some of these developers to come out of their shells, attend some of the public consultation meetings and explain exactly how much and how quickly they intend to proceed with their subdivision plans. People have a right to know how their community is going change, how fast it's going to grow and what efforts are being made to lessen the impact of growth on the already strained local road system.

Earlier this week, a group of residents from the Parkside Drive/Boulding Avenue area met to discuss their concerns about the proposed east-west route. They want Hamilton city officials to dust off the old Stantec engineering report that suggested another east-west bypass route around Waterdown. They want city officials to realize that long before Flamborough amalgamated with Hamilton, the need for a bypass was recognized.

A great deal of public consultation was done in the late 1990s and a preferred route was identified, which traveled north of Parkside and stayed well north of the urban area before veering southward to Hwy. 5 near Robson Road.

Let's hope that the dogleg system of roads being proposed will be abandoned for more direct routes. The pricetag will probably be higher, but if the result is reduced gridlock and less impact on existing neighbourhoods, it'll be worth every penny.

Bypassing a simple misnomer

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Bypass (n.) -a way, path, etc. between two points that avoids or is auxiliary to the main way; specifically, an alternative highway route, as for skirting an urban area.

That's the definition of bypass in the Webster's dictionary. To me, it sounds blatantly simple, but I'm a journalist, not an engineer, so I tend to look at the meaning of the word as something which will be followed to the letter when that word materializes into something concrete in grand transportation schemes. Such is not the case with the Waterdown/Aldershot Transportation Master Plan.

I can only shake my head, along with several area residents along Parkside Drive, when engineers of this grand plan refer to the proposed east-west corridor as a bypass. It's a complete misnomer. Why? Because the proposed route doesn't skirt the urban area. It's barely a stone's throw away from Parkside Drive, it travels just north of a proposed subdivision behind the Waterdown District High School and eventually connects with the east section of Parkside Drive near Churchill Avenue - all of which are very much a part of urban Waterdown.

How can that be a bypass? Bypasses are meant to move traffic around congested urban areas, not add to the traffic in the urban core. They're supposed to ease that traffic by taking it around the core. What's difficult about that concept?

Residents in the area are starting to question the engineers of this plan. I am, too. If they want to call the proposed route an 'east-west corridor,' then so be it. But don't try to pass it off as a bypass. It just doesn't fit the definition.

More than that, for many residents in the area, the plan defies logic. Who is going to follow a dogleg route, that zigs and zags through several residential streets?

The truth is we don't need any more road problems in Waterdown. We have quite enough, thank you. What we need are solutions to the gridlock that is becoming worse with each passing day.

A Master Transportation Plan should come up with creative solutions, not a convenient one that many residents suspect is driven by pressure from developers. It's time for cool heads to prevail. It's time for some of these developers to come out of their shells, attend some of the public consultation meetings and explain exactly how much and how quickly they intend to proceed with their subdivision plans. People have a right to know how their community is going change, how fast it's going to grow and what efforts are being made to lessen the impact of growth on the already strained local road system.

Earlier this week, a group of residents from the Parkside Drive/Boulding Avenue area met to discuss their concerns about the proposed east-west route. They want Hamilton city officials to dust off the old Stantec engineering report that suggested another east-west bypass route around Waterdown. They want city officials to realize that long before Flamborough amalgamated with Hamilton, the need for a bypass was recognized.

A great deal of public consultation was done in the late 1990s and a preferred route was identified, which traveled north of Parkside and stayed well north of the urban area before veering southward to Hwy. 5 near Robson Road.

Let's hope that the dogleg system of roads being proposed will be abandoned for more direct routes. The pricetag will probably be higher, but if the result is reduced gridlock and less impact on existing neighbourhoods, it'll be worth every penny.

Bypassing a simple misnomer

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Bypass (n.) -a way, path, etc. between two points that avoids or is auxiliary to the main way; specifically, an alternative highway route, as for skirting an urban area.

That's the definition of bypass in the Webster's dictionary. To me, it sounds blatantly simple, but I'm a journalist, not an engineer, so I tend to look at the meaning of the word as something which will be followed to the letter when that word materializes into something concrete in grand transportation schemes. Such is not the case with the Waterdown/Aldershot Transportation Master Plan.

I can only shake my head, along with several area residents along Parkside Drive, when engineers of this grand plan refer to the proposed east-west corridor as a bypass. It's a complete misnomer. Why? Because the proposed route doesn't skirt the urban area. It's barely a stone's throw away from Parkside Drive, it travels just north of a proposed subdivision behind the Waterdown District High School and eventually connects with the east section of Parkside Drive near Churchill Avenue - all of which are very much a part of urban Waterdown.

How can that be a bypass? Bypasses are meant to move traffic around congested urban areas, not add to the traffic in the urban core. They're supposed to ease that traffic by taking it around the core. What's difficult about that concept?

Residents in the area are starting to question the engineers of this plan. I am, too. If they want to call the proposed route an 'east-west corridor,' then so be it. But don't try to pass it off as a bypass. It just doesn't fit the definition.

More than that, for many residents in the area, the plan defies logic. Who is going to follow a dogleg route, that zigs and zags through several residential streets?

The truth is we don't need any more road problems in Waterdown. We have quite enough, thank you. What we need are solutions to the gridlock that is becoming worse with each passing day.

A Master Transportation Plan should come up with creative solutions, not a convenient one that many residents suspect is driven by pressure from developers. It's time for cool heads to prevail. It's time for some of these developers to come out of their shells, attend some of the public consultation meetings and explain exactly how much and how quickly they intend to proceed with their subdivision plans. People have a right to know how their community is going change, how fast it's going to grow and what efforts are being made to lessen the impact of growth on the already strained local road system.

Earlier this week, a group of residents from the Parkside Drive/Boulding Avenue area met to discuss their concerns about the proposed east-west route. They want Hamilton city officials to dust off the old Stantec engineering report that suggested another east-west bypass route around Waterdown. They want city officials to realize that long before Flamborough amalgamated with Hamilton, the need for a bypass was recognized.

A great deal of public consultation was done in the late 1990s and a preferred route was identified, which traveled north of Parkside and stayed well north of the urban area before veering southward to Hwy. 5 near Robson Road.

Let's hope that the dogleg system of roads being proposed will be abandoned for more direct routes. The pricetag will probably be higher, but if the result is reduced gridlock and less impact on existing neighbourhoods, it'll be worth every penny.