Bullying not just kid stuff

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

November 14-18 is Bullying Awareness Week in Canada, a week that recognizes the devastating consequences of a problem that is much more than "just kid stuff"- and affirms that this destructive behavior must be stopped.

RespectED, the Canadian Red Cross service that focuses on violence and abuse prevention education, is working with schools, training adults and youth, helping to educate youth in the name of community to change the dynamics and develop strategies to prevent this destructive behaviour.

Bullying, which includes not only physical and verbal aggression but also subtler cruelties such as isolation and rejection, occurs every day in Canadian schools and communities. Often, only the most overt incidents are dealt with by adults. For those youth who feel caught in the cruelty and unable to stop it, the fallout can be severe.

"Research consistently shows that bullying can devastate young people, leading to long-term emotional problems, diminished school success and, in rare but tragic cases, even deadly violence," says Marilyn Irish, Community Services Assistant with RespectED. "For the aggressor, unchecked bullying tendencies can escalate into criminal action in later years."

Bullying and other forms of harassment can also spread mistrust and fear throughout the community.

Everyone, young and old, needs to understand how actions and attitudes can help foster a healthy environment, Irish asserts.

"When you're being bullied, you feel very alone," she noted. "But you're actually part of a whole community that has an obligation to help make the problem stop."

Bullying not just kid stuff

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

November 14-18 is Bullying Awareness Week in Canada, a week that recognizes the devastating consequences of a problem that is much more than "just kid stuff"- and affirms that this destructive behavior must be stopped.

RespectED, the Canadian Red Cross service that focuses on violence and abuse prevention education, is working with schools, training adults and youth, helping to educate youth in the name of community to change the dynamics and develop strategies to prevent this destructive behaviour.

Bullying, which includes not only physical and verbal aggression but also subtler cruelties such as isolation and rejection, occurs every day in Canadian schools and communities. Often, only the most overt incidents are dealt with by adults. For those youth who feel caught in the cruelty and unable to stop it, the fallout can be severe.

"Research consistently shows that bullying can devastate young people, leading to long-term emotional problems, diminished school success and, in rare but tragic cases, even deadly violence," says Marilyn Irish, Community Services Assistant with RespectED. "For the aggressor, unchecked bullying tendencies can escalate into criminal action in later years."

Bullying and other forms of harassment can also spread mistrust and fear throughout the community.

Everyone, young and old, needs to understand how actions and attitudes can help foster a healthy environment, Irish asserts.

"When you're being bullied, you feel very alone," she noted. "But you're actually part of a whole community that has an obligation to help make the problem stop."

Bullying not just kid stuff

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

November 14-18 is Bullying Awareness Week in Canada, a week that recognizes the devastating consequences of a problem that is much more than "just kid stuff"- and affirms that this destructive behavior must be stopped.

RespectED, the Canadian Red Cross service that focuses on violence and abuse prevention education, is working with schools, training adults and youth, helping to educate youth in the name of community to change the dynamics and develop strategies to prevent this destructive behaviour.

Bullying, which includes not only physical and verbal aggression but also subtler cruelties such as isolation and rejection, occurs every day in Canadian schools and communities. Often, only the most overt incidents are dealt with by adults. For those youth who feel caught in the cruelty and unable to stop it, the fallout can be severe.

"Research consistently shows that bullying can devastate young people, leading to long-term emotional problems, diminished school success and, in rare but tragic cases, even deadly violence," says Marilyn Irish, Community Services Assistant with RespectED. "For the aggressor, unchecked bullying tendencies can escalate into criminal action in later years."

Bullying and other forms of harassment can also spread mistrust and fear throughout the community.

Everyone, young and old, needs to understand how actions and attitudes can help foster a healthy environment, Irish asserts.

"When you're being bullied, you feel very alone," she noted. "But you're actually part of a whole community that has an obligation to help make the problem stop."