Webster's Falls inspires artistic venture in Greensville mill

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

When John Rousseau went in search of a new enterprise, he wasn't sure what he was looking for. But when he saw an inconspicuous For Rent sign hanging in the Old Stone Gallery, he knew he was on the right path.

As a result, the former Associate Publisher of the Brabant newspaper chain opened Black and White last weekend. It's a gallery to showcase the work of promising local photographic talent.

He didn't know when he left publishing last spring that this would be his new niche in life.

But a trip to Webster's Falls fired his imagination. Unlike most businesses, the location came before the plan.

"I wanted to engineer myself from the environment out," he said. "So many times in business you wind up where you don't want to be. I've reached an age that I wanted to reposition myself in a place that I felt spoke to me."

With the location set, it wasn't difficult for the rest to fall into place. Greensville is a deeply artistic community, he noted.

The Old Stone Gallery in particular is a Mecca for artists and art lovers from across the region. McMaster Framing, an oil painter and a furniture builder share the creative space.

The quaint old mill lends itself perfectly to a gallery, but Rousseau wasn't interested in paintings.

"If you were to show me an oil painting, I'd have an appreciation for it, just like anyone would. But my career allows me to have some credibility in photography."

Rousseau trained in college as a photographer, and 30 years in publishing has given him an eye and deep appreciation for a great shot.

His first exhibitor is Katie Munn, a neonatal nurse from McMaster University. She met Rousseau through her brother, Lee, who works in production for the Brabant chain. He designed Black and White's logo and when Rousseau asked him for some photographs of Webster's Falls, he asked his sister to help him out.

Rousseau loved her shots, and asked to see more. What he saw amazed him.

Munn has a "playful" style, he said. Most of her photographs were the result of time spent with close friends, who had no idea at the time that they would one day be part of a gallery show.

Many are fellow nurses, others are family members.

She has a unique talent to capture women, noted Rousseau. Munn feels that comes from her love of photographing people, particularly her friends. "We get an intense connection going," she said. Her first show was a success. Nearly 300 patrons attended, including several members of the arts community.

"The fact that they took a few minutes out to come see what I was doing meant so much to me," said Rousseau.

Munn's collection will remain in the studio until January 31, and can be seen during business hours on Saturdays and Sundays. The pair, who has become good friends, sees a second show in the future.

Rousseau will be searching for new talent to spotlight in the future. Although he's partial to black and white photography, he's open to colour.

"If the story or the viewpoint is compelling, I can be moved," he said. "Depends on the unique sensibility of the pieces."

He's also keeping an open mind about his business. Although Black and White is the seed business, which has started him on a new entrepreneurial path, he's open to calling on his past experience as a self-employed businessman. He has vast experience in consulting, promotions and marketing, which he hopes to capitalize on.

Black and White is located in the Old Stone Gallery on Short Road, Greensville. For more information, call 905-627-4543.

Webster's Falls inspires artistic venture in Greensville mill

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

When John Rousseau went in search of a new enterprise, he wasn't sure what he was looking for. But when he saw an inconspicuous For Rent sign hanging in the Old Stone Gallery, he knew he was on the right path.

As a result, the former Associate Publisher of the Brabant newspaper chain opened Black and White last weekend. It's a gallery to showcase the work of promising local photographic talent.

He didn't know when he left publishing last spring that this would be his new niche in life.

But a trip to Webster's Falls fired his imagination. Unlike most businesses, the location came before the plan.

"I wanted to engineer myself from the environment out," he said. "So many times in business you wind up where you don't want to be. I've reached an age that I wanted to reposition myself in a place that I felt spoke to me."

With the location set, it wasn't difficult for the rest to fall into place. Greensville is a deeply artistic community, he noted.

The Old Stone Gallery in particular is a Mecca for artists and art lovers from across the region. McMaster Framing, an oil painter and a furniture builder share the creative space.

The quaint old mill lends itself perfectly to a gallery, but Rousseau wasn't interested in paintings.

"If you were to show me an oil painting, I'd have an appreciation for it, just like anyone would. But my career allows me to have some credibility in photography."

Rousseau trained in college as a photographer, and 30 years in publishing has given him an eye and deep appreciation for a great shot.

His first exhibitor is Katie Munn, a neonatal nurse from McMaster University. She met Rousseau through her brother, Lee, who works in production for the Brabant chain. He designed Black and White's logo and when Rousseau asked him for some photographs of Webster's Falls, he asked his sister to help him out.

Rousseau loved her shots, and asked to see more. What he saw amazed him.

Munn has a "playful" style, he said. Most of her photographs were the result of time spent with close friends, who had no idea at the time that they would one day be part of a gallery show.

Many are fellow nurses, others are family members.

She has a unique talent to capture women, noted Rousseau. Munn feels that comes from her love of photographing people, particularly her friends. "We get an intense connection going," she said. Her first show was a success. Nearly 300 patrons attended, including several members of the arts community.

"The fact that they took a few minutes out to come see what I was doing meant so much to me," said Rousseau.

Munn's collection will remain in the studio until January 31, and can be seen during business hours on Saturdays and Sundays. The pair, who has become good friends, sees a second show in the future.

Rousseau will be searching for new talent to spotlight in the future. Although he's partial to black and white photography, he's open to colour.

"If the story or the viewpoint is compelling, I can be moved," he said. "Depends on the unique sensibility of the pieces."

He's also keeping an open mind about his business. Although Black and White is the seed business, which has started him on a new entrepreneurial path, he's open to calling on his past experience as a self-employed businessman. He has vast experience in consulting, promotions and marketing, which he hopes to capitalize on.

Black and White is located in the Old Stone Gallery on Short Road, Greensville. For more information, call 905-627-4543.

Webster's Falls inspires artistic venture in Greensville mill

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

When John Rousseau went in search of a new enterprise, he wasn't sure what he was looking for. But when he saw an inconspicuous For Rent sign hanging in the Old Stone Gallery, he knew he was on the right path.

As a result, the former Associate Publisher of the Brabant newspaper chain opened Black and White last weekend. It's a gallery to showcase the work of promising local photographic talent.

He didn't know when he left publishing last spring that this would be his new niche in life.

But a trip to Webster's Falls fired his imagination. Unlike most businesses, the location came before the plan.

"I wanted to engineer myself from the environment out," he said. "So many times in business you wind up where you don't want to be. I've reached an age that I wanted to reposition myself in a place that I felt spoke to me."

With the location set, it wasn't difficult for the rest to fall into place. Greensville is a deeply artistic community, he noted.

The Old Stone Gallery in particular is a Mecca for artists and art lovers from across the region. McMaster Framing, an oil painter and a furniture builder share the creative space.

The quaint old mill lends itself perfectly to a gallery, but Rousseau wasn't interested in paintings.

"If you were to show me an oil painting, I'd have an appreciation for it, just like anyone would. But my career allows me to have some credibility in photography."

Rousseau trained in college as a photographer, and 30 years in publishing has given him an eye and deep appreciation for a great shot.

His first exhibitor is Katie Munn, a neonatal nurse from McMaster University. She met Rousseau through her brother, Lee, who works in production for the Brabant chain. He designed Black and White's logo and when Rousseau asked him for some photographs of Webster's Falls, he asked his sister to help him out.

Rousseau loved her shots, and asked to see more. What he saw amazed him.

Munn has a "playful" style, he said. Most of her photographs were the result of time spent with close friends, who had no idea at the time that they would one day be part of a gallery show.

Many are fellow nurses, others are family members.

She has a unique talent to capture women, noted Rousseau. Munn feels that comes from her love of photographing people, particularly her friends. "We get an intense connection going," she said. Her first show was a success. Nearly 300 patrons attended, including several members of the arts community.

"The fact that they took a few minutes out to come see what I was doing meant so much to me," said Rousseau.

Munn's collection will remain in the studio until January 31, and can be seen during business hours on Saturdays and Sundays. The pair, who has become good friends, sees a second show in the future.

Rousseau will be searching for new talent to spotlight in the future. Although he's partial to black and white photography, he's open to colour.

"If the story or the viewpoint is compelling, I can be moved," he said. "Depends on the unique sensibility of the pieces."

He's also keeping an open mind about his business. Although Black and White is the seed business, which has started him on a new entrepreneurial path, he's open to calling on his past experience as a self-employed businessman. He has vast experience in consulting, promotions and marketing, which he hopes to capitalize on.

Black and White is located in the Old Stone Gallery on Short Road, Greensville. For more information, call 905-627-4543.