Local candidates have mixed feelings about early election call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For just the sixth time since Confederation, it appears that Canadians will be headed to the polls for a winter federal election. And while it's unclear whether it will fall in early January or in February, party lines are well in place with candidates ready to hit the campaign trail.

"It's the same cast of characters," David Sweet of Ancaster said this week. He'll carry the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) banner as he did last June; Russ Powers of Dundas will be back to defend his Liberal seat; Dr. Gordon Guyatt of Dundas will be the NDP candidate, and David Januczkowski of Flamborough will represent the Green Party.

Sweet made no apologies for his party's part in forcing an early election. "The initial Gomery report (into the sponsorship scandal) laid out the picture very clearly on the level of corruption in the Liberal government," he said. "It's our obligation to the Canadian people" to call an election and give voters an opportunity to oust the government, he added.

Reacting to the unpopularity of a Christmas season election campaign, he said Prime Minister Paul Martin can avoid that if he chooses to take the offer proposed by NDP leader Jack Layton which will delay campaigning until after the holiday season. "Clearly, the timing of the election (as it relates to the Christmas season) is up to Prime Minister Martin," he said. To date, however, Martin has refused to accept Layton's offer.

Whenever the election is called, the Conservative Party in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale (ACFW) riding "is ready to stand up for Canadians," rid the country of its current "scandal-ridden government" and restore "accountable government," Sweet said.

Guyatt feels it's unfortunate that a Christmas election seems inevitable. With the Liberals' refusal to back Layton's proposal, "the opposition has little choice," he said.

However, he feels the media and the public have placed too much emphasis on the timing of the election, and not enough on the substance. He feels the Liberals have focused on tax cuts. But he feels that Parliament's strong NDP presence has helped temper Prime Minister Paul Martin's "business and conservative interests."

Guyatt is ready for the campaign, whenever it's called. He's given careful thought to the issues, and is looking forward to bringing them to voters.

Januczkowski presented a different view. He thinks the minority Liberal government should remain in office until late next year when an election could be called.

"Like most Canadians, I prefer to see an election next fall," he said. "A winter election is unprecedented in recent memory and not good timing in terms of the holiday season."

Januczkowski said he suspects the Conservatives and NDP want to force an election before the final Gomery report is released because the report is expected to put the blame for the sponsorship corruption scandal on former Liberal Party members rather than those presently governing the country. "I feel the Conservatives and NDP think that will work against them in a spring campaign."

Minority governments have been successful in creating constructive policies in a number of areas, including pension reform and unemployment insurance, Januczkowski recalled. He believes all parties should work together and get on with the business of governing.

Calling an election for early next year is "another example of party politics that interfere with the proper running of the country" and "another reason for Canadians to be cynical about politics," he contended.

Liberal MP Powers declined to comment on an election until the writ is dropped.

Local candidates have mixed feelings about early election call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For just the sixth time since Confederation, it appears that Canadians will be headed to the polls for a winter federal election. And while it's unclear whether it will fall in early January or in February, party lines are well in place with candidates ready to hit the campaign trail.

"It's the same cast of characters," David Sweet of Ancaster said this week. He'll carry the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) banner as he did last June; Russ Powers of Dundas will be back to defend his Liberal seat; Dr. Gordon Guyatt of Dundas will be the NDP candidate, and David Januczkowski of Flamborough will represent the Green Party.

Sweet made no apologies for his party's part in forcing an early election. "The initial Gomery report (into the sponsorship scandal) laid out the picture very clearly on the level of corruption in the Liberal government," he said. "It's our obligation to the Canadian people" to call an election and give voters an opportunity to oust the government, he added.

Reacting to the unpopularity of a Christmas season election campaign, he said Prime Minister Paul Martin can avoid that if he chooses to take the offer proposed by NDP leader Jack Layton which will delay campaigning until after the holiday season. "Clearly, the timing of the election (as it relates to the Christmas season) is up to Prime Minister Martin," he said. To date, however, Martin has refused to accept Layton's offer.

Whenever the election is called, the Conservative Party in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale (ACFW) riding "is ready to stand up for Canadians," rid the country of its current "scandal-ridden government" and restore "accountable government," Sweet said.

Guyatt feels it's unfortunate that a Christmas election seems inevitable. With the Liberals' refusal to back Layton's proposal, "the opposition has little choice," he said.

However, he feels the media and the public have placed too much emphasis on the timing of the election, and not enough on the substance. He feels the Liberals have focused on tax cuts. But he feels that Parliament's strong NDP presence has helped temper Prime Minister Paul Martin's "business and conservative interests."

Guyatt is ready for the campaign, whenever it's called. He's given careful thought to the issues, and is looking forward to bringing them to voters.

Januczkowski presented a different view. He thinks the minority Liberal government should remain in office until late next year when an election could be called.

"Like most Canadians, I prefer to see an election next fall," he said. "A winter election is unprecedented in recent memory and not good timing in terms of the holiday season."

Januczkowski said he suspects the Conservatives and NDP want to force an election before the final Gomery report is released because the report is expected to put the blame for the sponsorship corruption scandal on former Liberal Party members rather than those presently governing the country. "I feel the Conservatives and NDP think that will work against them in a spring campaign."

Minority governments have been successful in creating constructive policies in a number of areas, including pension reform and unemployment insurance, Januczkowski recalled. He believes all parties should work together and get on with the business of governing.

Calling an election for early next year is "another example of party politics that interfere with the proper running of the country" and "another reason for Canadians to be cynical about politics," he contended.

Liberal MP Powers declined to comment on an election until the writ is dropped.

Local candidates have mixed feelings about early election call

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For just the sixth time since Confederation, it appears that Canadians will be headed to the polls for a winter federal election. And while it's unclear whether it will fall in early January or in February, party lines are well in place with candidates ready to hit the campaign trail.

"It's the same cast of characters," David Sweet of Ancaster said this week. He'll carry the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) banner as he did last June; Russ Powers of Dundas will be back to defend his Liberal seat; Dr. Gordon Guyatt of Dundas will be the NDP candidate, and David Januczkowski of Flamborough will represent the Green Party.

Sweet made no apologies for his party's part in forcing an early election. "The initial Gomery report (into the sponsorship scandal) laid out the picture very clearly on the level of corruption in the Liberal government," he said. "It's our obligation to the Canadian people" to call an election and give voters an opportunity to oust the government, he added.

Reacting to the unpopularity of a Christmas season election campaign, he said Prime Minister Paul Martin can avoid that if he chooses to take the offer proposed by NDP leader Jack Layton which will delay campaigning until after the holiday season. "Clearly, the timing of the election (as it relates to the Christmas season) is up to Prime Minister Martin," he said. To date, however, Martin has refused to accept Layton's offer.

Whenever the election is called, the Conservative Party in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale (ACFW) riding "is ready to stand up for Canadians," rid the country of its current "scandal-ridden government" and restore "accountable government," Sweet said.

Guyatt feels it's unfortunate that a Christmas election seems inevitable. With the Liberals' refusal to back Layton's proposal, "the opposition has little choice," he said.

However, he feels the media and the public have placed too much emphasis on the timing of the election, and not enough on the substance. He feels the Liberals have focused on tax cuts. But he feels that Parliament's strong NDP presence has helped temper Prime Minister Paul Martin's "business and conservative interests."

Guyatt is ready for the campaign, whenever it's called. He's given careful thought to the issues, and is looking forward to bringing them to voters.

Januczkowski presented a different view. He thinks the minority Liberal government should remain in office until late next year when an election could be called.

"Like most Canadians, I prefer to see an election next fall," he said. "A winter election is unprecedented in recent memory and not good timing in terms of the holiday season."

Januczkowski said he suspects the Conservatives and NDP want to force an election before the final Gomery report is released because the report is expected to put the blame for the sponsorship corruption scandal on former Liberal Party members rather than those presently governing the country. "I feel the Conservatives and NDP think that will work against them in a spring campaign."

Minority governments have been successful in creating constructive policies in a number of areas, including pension reform and unemployment insurance, Januczkowski recalled. He believes all parties should work together and get on with the business of governing.

Calling an election for early next year is "another example of party politics that interfere with the proper running of the country" and "another reason for Canadians to be cynical about politics," he contended.

Liberal MP Powers declined to comment on an election until the writ is dropped.