Rural residents request lower speed limits

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Brock Road residents want Hamilton city council to put the brakes on speeders.

At a ward meeting hosted by Wentworth councillor Dave Braden last Tuesday, speakers said they fear for their lives when walking along the narrow road, which runs from Hwy. 97 to Hwy. 5 through the village of Strabane. They want the city to lower speed limits along the route.

Traffic volume and speed has become a major concern to local residents, said Strabane homeowner Murray McCullum. Concern grew to the stage where McCullum took a petition around to Brock Road homes between Safari Road and Hwy. 97. The petition, calling for reduced speed limits, was signed by about 60 people, which represents about 80 per cent of the residents who live along that stretch of the road.

At the meeting, which drew a crowd of about 25 to Strabane United Church, constituents told Braden and two representatives of the city's traffic department that changes need to be made.

"There are more trucks on this road than ever," one said, noting that trucks travelling to the Flamboro Quarry and the Rothsay rendering plant use the road regularly. Horse trailers headed either to Flamboro Downs or Mohawk Raceway in Campbellville also use the road, as do trailers headed to Flamboro Speedway. The result is a heavily-travelled road where speed limits are not always adhered to, residents said.

"They (the trucks and trailers) sail down here. Some are going 100 km/h," the man complained.

"The speed limit on most concession roads in Flamborough is 70 km/h. Why not make it the same here?" asked John Flechl. He and others noted that tractors use the road and horse riders often ride along the side.

Residents want to see the speed limit dropped from 80 km/h to 70 km/h from Hwy. 97 to the Strabane village sign. The speed limit through Strabane would remain at 60 km/h but would be extended to just south of the community park at the corner of Brock Road and Safari Road.

One woman, who resides at the south end of Brock Road, suggested that a 60 kph speed limit be adopted along the full length of the road.

When Sue Russell of Hamilton's traffic department suggested that reduced speed limits won't slow speeders down, members of the audience challenged her for looking at the problem as a driving issue rather than as a community safety issue.

"There's a whole community living here," a female resident said. "It's not a driver concern for me."

A man in the crowd backed her up, telling Russell, "You're looking at the driver's perspective rather than the residents' perspective."

A speed limit review was conducted by the city in June and a report is expected to go to council in Februrary. The study showed that people are driving well beyond the speed limit; in a posted 80 kph zone at the south end of Brock Road, cars were often clocked travelling between 87 and 92 kph, Russell said.

The study also showed that the stop sign at the corner of Brock Road and 8th Concession Road West, just below Strabane, isn't being honoured. About 20 per cent of the drivers came to a complete stop at the intersection, but the remainder simply slowed down and proceeded on through, Russell said.

At present, city staff's position is to maintain the current 80 kph speed limit from Hwy. 97 to the Strabane village sign, the 60 kph through Strabane and the 70 kph to just beyond the Strabane community park.

But Braden told the crowd that if 85 per cent of the community wants lower speed limits, he will plead their case at council. He suggested that a three-member community committee be formed to promote "a clear message on tighter speed control."

Several residents voiced their concerns about safety by referring to the number of accidents on the road.

"There have been 14 documented accidents outside my medical building because of an unwillingness to slow down," protested Dr. Linda Holland, who lives between Safari Road and the 8th Concession. Another woman spoke of blind spots and dips in the road which are even more treacherous when people drive at high speeds. Others spoke of the need for police enforcement of speed limits.

"It's not just one thing," Linda Sway said of the speeding problem. "It's speed limits and the police" to enforce them.

"If there is a clear issue here, I can get police out," Braden said, noting that Highway 52, which had its speed limit reduced from 80 to 70 kph about a year ago, has a sustained police presence. "At (Hwy.) 52, (the police) are nailing people everywhere. It has our attention," he said.

McCullum believes that residents presented a convincing argument to Russell and her traffic department colleague, Steve Cooper.

"I think they're getting more and more convinced" of the need for speed reductions along Brock Road, he said.

Rural residents request lower speed limits

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Brock Road residents want Hamilton city council to put the brakes on speeders.

At a ward meeting hosted by Wentworth councillor Dave Braden last Tuesday, speakers said they fear for their lives when walking along the narrow road, which runs from Hwy. 97 to Hwy. 5 through the village of Strabane. They want the city to lower speed limits along the route.

Traffic volume and speed has become a major concern to local residents, said Strabane homeowner Murray McCullum. Concern grew to the stage where McCullum took a petition around to Brock Road homes between Safari Road and Hwy. 97. The petition, calling for reduced speed limits, was signed by about 60 people, which represents about 80 per cent of the residents who live along that stretch of the road.

At the meeting, which drew a crowd of about 25 to Strabane United Church, constituents told Braden and two representatives of the city's traffic department that changes need to be made.

"There are more trucks on this road than ever," one said, noting that trucks travelling to the Flamboro Quarry and the Rothsay rendering plant use the road regularly. Horse trailers headed either to Flamboro Downs or Mohawk Raceway in Campbellville also use the road, as do trailers headed to Flamboro Speedway. The result is a heavily-travelled road where speed limits are not always adhered to, residents said.

"They (the trucks and trailers) sail down here. Some are going 100 km/h," the man complained.

"The speed limit on most concession roads in Flamborough is 70 km/h. Why not make it the same here?" asked John Flechl. He and others noted that tractors use the road and horse riders often ride along the side.

Residents want to see the speed limit dropped from 80 km/h to 70 km/h from Hwy. 97 to the Strabane village sign. The speed limit through Strabane would remain at 60 km/h but would be extended to just south of the community park at the corner of Brock Road and Safari Road.

One woman, who resides at the south end of Brock Road, suggested that a 60 kph speed limit be adopted along the full length of the road.

When Sue Russell of Hamilton's traffic department suggested that reduced speed limits won't slow speeders down, members of the audience challenged her for looking at the problem as a driving issue rather than as a community safety issue.

"There's a whole community living here," a female resident said. "It's not a driver concern for me."

A man in the crowd backed her up, telling Russell, "You're looking at the driver's perspective rather than the residents' perspective."

A speed limit review was conducted by the city in June and a report is expected to go to council in Februrary. The study showed that people are driving well beyond the speed limit; in a posted 80 kph zone at the south end of Brock Road, cars were often clocked travelling between 87 and 92 kph, Russell said.

The study also showed that the stop sign at the corner of Brock Road and 8th Concession Road West, just below Strabane, isn't being honoured. About 20 per cent of the drivers came to a complete stop at the intersection, but the remainder simply slowed down and proceeded on through, Russell said.

At present, city staff's position is to maintain the current 80 kph speed limit from Hwy. 97 to the Strabane village sign, the 60 kph through Strabane and the 70 kph to just beyond the Strabane community park.

But Braden told the crowd that if 85 per cent of the community wants lower speed limits, he will plead their case at council. He suggested that a three-member community committee be formed to promote "a clear message on tighter speed control."

Several residents voiced their concerns about safety by referring to the number of accidents on the road.

"There have been 14 documented accidents outside my medical building because of an unwillingness to slow down," protested Dr. Linda Holland, who lives between Safari Road and the 8th Concession. Another woman spoke of blind spots and dips in the road which are even more treacherous when people drive at high speeds. Others spoke of the need for police enforcement of speed limits.

"It's not just one thing," Linda Sway said of the speeding problem. "It's speed limits and the police" to enforce them.

"If there is a clear issue here, I can get police out," Braden said, noting that Highway 52, which had its speed limit reduced from 80 to 70 kph about a year ago, has a sustained police presence. "At (Hwy.) 52, (the police) are nailing people everywhere. It has our attention," he said.

McCullum believes that residents presented a convincing argument to Russell and her traffic department colleague, Steve Cooper.

"I think they're getting more and more convinced" of the need for speed reductions along Brock Road, he said.

Rural residents request lower speed limits

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Brock Road residents want Hamilton city council to put the brakes on speeders.

At a ward meeting hosted by Wentworth councillor Dave Braden last Tuesday, speakers said they fear for their lives when walking along the narrow road, which runs from Hwy. 97 to Hwy. 5 through the village of Strabane. They want the city to lower speed limits along the route.

Traffic volume and speed has become a major concern to local residents, said Strabane homeowner Murray McCullum. Concern grew to the stage where McCullum took a petition around to Brock Road homes between Safari Road and Hwy. 97. The petition, calling for reduced speed limits, was signed by about 60 people, which represents about 80 per cent of the residents who live along that stretch of the road.

At the meeting, which drew a crowd of about 25 to Strabane United Church, constituents told Braden and two representatives of the city's traffic department that changes need to be made.

"There are more trucks on this road than ever," one said, noting that trucks travelling to the Flamboro Quarry and the Rothsay rendering plant use the road regularly. Horse trailers headed either to Flamboro Downs or Mohawk Raceway in Campbellville also use the road, as do trailers headed to Flamboro Speedway. The result is a heavily-travelled road where speed limits are not always adhered to, residents said.

"They (the trucks and trailers) sail down here. Some are going 100 km/h," the man complained.

"The speed limit on most concession roads in Flamborough is 70 km/h. Why not make it the same here?" asked John Flechl. He and others noted that tractors use the road and horse riders often ride along the side.

Residents want to see the speed limit dropped from 80 km/h to 70 km/h from Hwy. 97 to the Strabane village sign. The speed limit through Strabane would remain at 60 km/h but would be extended to just south of the community park at the corner of Brock Road and Safari Road.

One woman, who resides at the south end of Brock Road, suggested that a 60 kph speed limit be adopted along the full length of the road.

When Sue Russell of Hamilton's traffic department suggested that reduced speed limits won't slow speeders down, members of the audience challenged her for looking at the problem as a driving issue rather than as a community safety issue.

"There's a whole community living here," a female resident said. "It's not a driver concern for me."

A man in the crowd backed her up, telling Russell, "You're looking at the driver's perspective rather than the residents' perspective."

A speed limit review was conducted by the city in June and a report is expected to go to council in Februrary. The study showed that people are driving well beyond the speed limit; in a posted 80 kph zone at the south end of Brock Road, cars were often clocked travelling between 87 and 92 kph, Russell said.

The study also showed that the stop sign at the corner of Brock Road and 8th Concession Road West, just below Strabane, isn't being honoured. About 20 per cent of the drivers came to a complete stop at the intersection, but the remainder simply slowed down and proceeded on through, Russell said.

At present, city staff's position is to maintain the current 80 kph speed limit from Hwy. 97 to the Strabane village sign, the 60 kph through Strabane and the 70 kph to just beyond the Strabane community park.

But Braden told the crowd that if 85 per cent of the community wants lower speed limits, he will plead their case at council. He suggested that a three-member community committee be formed to promote "a clear message on tighter speed control."

Several residents voiced their concerns about safety by referring to the number of accidents on the road.

"There have been 14 documented accidents outside my medical building because of an unwillingness to slow down," protested Dr. Linda Holland, who lives between Safari Road and the 8th Concession. Another woman spoke of blind spots and dips in the road which are even more treacherous when people drive at high speeds. Others spoke of the need for police enforcement of speed limits.

"It's not just one thing," Linda Sway said of the speeding problem. "It's speed limits and the police" to enforce them.

"If there is a clear issue here, I can get police out," Braden said, noting that Highway 52, which had its speed limit reduced from 80 to 70 kph about a year ago, has a sustained police presence. "At (Hwy.) 52, (the police) are nailing people everywhere. It has our attention," he said.

McCullum believes that residents presented a convincing argument to Russell and her traffic department colleague, Steve Cooper.

"I think they're getting more and more convinced" of the need for speed reductions along Brock Road, he said.