Residents to get doused with rate increase

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The city's early Christmas present to residents will include a bill for an extra $38.60 to use the municipality's water and sewers.

Politicians are expected to approve a 7.5 per cent increase on residents' water and sewer rates at a special committee of the whole meeting today (December 2).

The hike will mean the average homeowner's water and sewer bill will increase from $516.48 to $555.10 per year.

The increase will fund the 2006 $144.7 million water and sewer budget, compared to last year's $133.7 million. About $75.7 million will go towards capital and debt financing, while $69 million will fund programs.

The higher rates will support an increase in operating expenses of about $11 million.

The budgetary pressures the city has to deal with include $1.5 million in higher salaries; $500,000 in supplies; $700,000 in fuel and $900,000 in contracts. Hamilton's costs have also increased because the city took over operating the Woodward Avenue Wastewater Treatment Facility from American Water Services Canada Corp this year.

City staff contend Hamilton still remains near the bottom of water rate charges across the province. St. Catharines, for instance, charges $690, while Guelph charges $552, and Ottawa $538. Peel charges the lowest rate at $303, among 14 other Ontario municipalities. Toronto is second to last charging $394.

Politicians approved last year an 8.1 per cent rate increase, that translated into $38 added onto the average homeowner's bill.

Since 2000, Hamilton councillors have been steadily approving rising water and sewer rates to raise enough money to make the city's waste and waste water system sustainable.

Initially, city staff proposed raising the water and sewer rates 15 per cent each each until 2007. But a revised plan was introduced in 2003 to raise rates 9.5 per cent until 2007.

City staff in 2004 revised their funding calculations again, acknowledging the "aggressive" rate hike strategy would have hit vulnerable taxpayers such as seniors and low income earners harder.

The plan now is to propose rate increases of 7.25 per cent in 2007, 6.75 per cent in 2008, then have increases of 4.50 in 2009 and 4 per cent in 2010.

Residents to get doused with rate increase

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The city's early Christmas present to residents will include a bill for an extra $38.60 to use the municipality's water and sewers.

Politicians are expected to approve a 7.5 per cent increase on residents' water and sewer rates at a special committee of the whole meeting today (December 2).

The hike will mean the average homeowner's water and sewer bill will increase from $516.48 to $555.10 per year.

The increase will fund the 2006 $144.7 million water and sewer budget, compared to last year's $133.7 million. About $75.7 million will go towards capital and debt financing, while $69 million will fund programs.

The higher rates will support an increase in operating expenses of about $11 million.

The budgetary pressures the city has to deal with include $1.5 million in higher salaries; $500,000 in supplies; $700,000 in fuel and $900,000 in contracts. Hamilton's costs have also increased because the city took over operating the Woodward Avenue Wastewater Treatment Facility from American Water Services Canada Corp this year.

City staff contend Hamilton still remains near the bottom of water rate charges across the province. St. Catharines, for instance, charges $690, while Guelph charges $552, and Ottawa $538. Peel charges the lowest rate at $303, among 14 other Ontario municipalities. Toronto is second to last charging $394.

Politicians approved last year an 8.1 per cent rate increase, that translated into $38 added onto the average homeowner's bill.

Since 2000, Hamilton councillors have been steadily approving rising water and sewer rates to raise enough money to make the city's waste and waste water system sustainable.

Initially, city staff proposed raising the water and sewer rates 15 per cent each each until 2007. But a revised plan was introduced in 2003 to raise rates 9.5 per cent until 2007.

City staff in 2004 revised their funding calculations again, acknowledging the "aggressive" rate hike strategy would have hit vulnerable taxpayers such as seniors and low income earners harder.

The plan now is to propose rate increases of 7.25 per cent in 2007, 6.75 per cent in 2008, then have increases of 4.50 in 2009 and 4 per cent in 2010.

Residents to get doused with rate increase

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The city's early Christmas present to residents will include a bill for an extra $38.60 to use the municipality's water and sewers.

Politicians are expected to approve a 7.5 per cent increase on residents' water and sewer rates at a special committee of the whole meeting today (December 2).

The hike will mean the average homeowner's water and sewer bill will increase from $516.48 to $555.10 per year.

The increase will fund the 2006 $144.7 million water and sewer budget, compared to last year's $133.7 million. About $75.7 million will go towards capital and debt financing, while $69 million will fund programs.

The higher rates will support an increase in operating expenses of about $11 million.

The budgetary pressures the city has to deal with include $1.5 million in higher salaries; $500,000 in supplies; $700,000 in fuel and $900,000 in contracts. Hamilton's costs have also increased because the city took over operating the Woodward Avenue Wastewater Treatment Facility from American Water Services Canada Corp this year.

City staff contend Hamilton still remains near the bottom of water rate charges across the province. St. Catharines, for instance, charges $690, while Guelph charges $552, and Ottawa $538. Peel charges the lowest rate at $303, among 14 other Ontario municipalities. Toronto is second to last charging $394.

Politicians approved last year an 8.1 per cent rate increase, that translated into $38 added onto the average homeowner's bill.

Since 2000, Hamilton councillors have been steadily approving rising water and sewer rates to raise enough money to make the city's waste and waste water system sustainable.

Initially, city staff proposed raising the water and sewer rates 15 per cent each each until 2007. But a revised plan was introduced in 2003 to raise rates 9.5 per cent until 2007.

City staff in 2004 revised their funding calculations again, acknowledging the "aggressive" rate hike strategy would have hit vulnerable taxpayers such as seniors and low income earners harder.

The plan now is to propose rate increases of 7.25 per cent in 2007, 6.75 per cent in 2008, then have increases of 4.50 in 2009 and 4 per cent in 2010.