Voter apathy is not an option this time

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The deed is done, the writ has been dropped, and as anticipated, Canadians are once again headed to the polls for a chilly January 23 election just 19 months after the Paul Martin Liberals eked out a minority government in June, 2004.

But even as the fallout from the Gomery inquiry continues to trickle down from the House, the complexion of the local political scene has changed little. Vying to wrest Liberal incumbent MP Russ Powers' seat (previously the domain of Liberal John Bryden) are, once again, David Sweet (Conservative Party of Canada), Gordon Guyatt (NDP) and David Januczkowski (Green Party).

In the 2004 election, the numbers in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding were slightly off of the national result: Powers boasted 21,539 ballots for 39.9 per cent of the vote; Sweet came in with 18,951 or 34.9 per cent and Guyatt lagged behind with 11,244 or 20.7 per cent. Januczkowsi counted for 2,608 ballots, 4.8 per cent of the vote.

Issues, this time around, echo those of the last campaign - not surprising since the current Parliament barely had time to break in their chairs before once again interrupting the business of the day to dust off their campaign signs to go out stumping. Health care, education, the deal for cities, Canada's foreign affairs policy once again top the list, and chances are the answers, from the same players, will be the same we heard last time around.

But this time, hopefully, the public will put aside their Christmas lists and holiday errands and listen through ears that have now heard evidence of corruption at the highest levels, involving amounts of money that the average citizen will never see.

And while inclement weather - not to mention a growing sense of jaded cynicism when it comes to all things political - may be an enticement to voter apathy, or even to opt for the status quo, those simply aren't options this time around.

Thanks to Justice Gomery we have a chance, however ill-timed, to send a clear message to politicians in this country.

It's up to us not to waste it.

Voter apathy is not an option this time

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The deed is done, the writ has been dropped, and as anticipated, Canadians are once again headed to the polls for a chilly January 23 election just 19 months after the Paul Martin Liberals eked out a minority government in June, 2004.

But even as the fallout from the Gomery inquiry continues to trickle down from the House, the complexion of the local political scene has changed little. Vying to wrest Liberal incumbent MP Russ Powers' seat (previously the domain of Liberal John Bryden) are, once again, David Sweet (Conservative Party of Canada), Gordon Guyatt (NDP) and David Januczkowski (Green Party).

In the 2004 election, the numbers in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding were slightly off of the national result: Powers boasted 21,539 ballots for 39.9 per cent of the vote; Sweet came in with 18,951 or 34.9 per cent and Guyatt lagged behind with 11,244 or 20.7 per cent. Januczkowsi counted for 2,608 ballots, 4.8 per cent of the vote.

Issues, this time around, echo those of the last campaign - not surprising since the current Parliament barely had time to break in their chairs before once again interrupting the business of the day to dust off their campaign signs to go out stumping. Health care, education, the deal for cities, Canada's foreign affairs policy once again top the list, and chances are the answers, from the same players, will be the same we heard last time around.

But this time, hopefully, the public will put aside their Christmas lists and holiday errands and listen through ears that have now heard evidence of corruption at the highest levels, involving amounts of money that the average citizen will never see.

And while inclement weather - not to mention a growing sense of jaded cynicism when it comes to all things political - may be an enticement to voter apathy, or even to opt for the status quo, those simply aren't options this time around.

Thanks to Justice Gomery we have a chance, however ill-timed, to send a clear message to politicians in this country.

It's up to us not to waste it.

Voter apathy is not an option this time

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The deed is done, the writ has been dropped, and as anticipated, Canadians are once again headed to the polls for a chilly January 23 election just 19 months after the Paul Martin Liberals eked out a minority government in June, 2004.

But even as the fallout from the Gomery inquiry continues to trickle down from the House, the complexion of the local political scene has changed little. Vying to wrest Liberal incumbent MP Russ Powers' seat (previously the domain of Liberal John Bryden) are, once again, David Sweet (Conservative Party of Canada), Gordon Guyatt (NDP) and David Januczkowski (Green Party).

In the 2004 election, the numbers in the Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding were slightly off of the national result: Powers boasted 21,539 ballots for 39.9 per cent of the vote; Sweet came in with 18,951 or 34.9 per cent and Guyatt lagged behind with 11,244 or 20.7 per cent. Januczkowsi counted for 2,608 ballots, 4.8 per cent of the vote.

Issues, this time around, echo those of the last campaign - not surprising since the current Parliament barely had time to break in their chairs before once again interrupting the business of the day to dust off their campaign signs to go out stumping. Health care, education, the deal for cities, Canada's foreign affairs policy once again top the list, and chances are the answers, from the same players, will be the same we heard last time around.

But this time, hopefully, the public will put aside their Christmas lists and holiday errands and listen through ears that have now heard evidence of corruption at the highest levels, involving amounts of money that the average citizen will never see.

And while inclement weather - not to mention a growing sense of jaded cynicism when it comes to all things political - may be an enticement to voter apathy, or even to opt for the status quo, those simply aren't options this time around.

Thanks to Justice Gomery we have a chance, however ill-timed, to send a clear message to politicians in this country.

It's up to us not to waste it.