North Waterdown residents drive for review of road planning process

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Opposition is mounting on the proposed east-west road that will traverse northern Waterdown as part of the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Master Plan study. As the Phase 2 report showing the preferred routes for an east-west road as well as a north-south road gets fine-tuned by staff before heading to city council early next year, residents along the eastern portion of the Parkside Drive area in Waterdown are becoming more vocal.

"I question the whole process," Al Seferiades said this week expressing his personal doubts that the public meetings held to date have been anything more than "just a formality." Steve Oliver, a Boulding Avenue area resident, echoes Seferiades' concerns. He remains unconvinced that planners recommending the route have given adequate consideration to the increased traffic that will cross the area if the new route is approved. "I think they should strongly consider the effect of the planned route on the east side of Parkside. The increased traffic will be a burden on our neighbourhood," he maintained.

The new transportation routes are being proposed to meet the traffic demands that Waterdown will face with the proposed addition of 6,500 homes over the next 10 years. The east-west route will run east of Hwy. 6, north of Parkside Drive and through the proposed Waterdown North subdivision near Parkside Drive and Centre Road before connecting with an expanded Parkside Drive east of Churchill Avenue. It will proceed easterly along Parkside before jogging south along the eastern boundary of Upcountry Estates and meeting Dundas Street (Hwy. 5).

Seferiades and Oliver prefer an alternative route, which planners looked at but discounted for a number of reasons, including environmental factors. Their preference would follow basically the same route in the western end of the proposed road but would see it continue north of Parkside well beyond Churchill Avenue not turning southward until it is east of Robson Road. It would then connect in a straight line with the new road along the eastern boundary of Upcountry Estates.

Their preference is closely aligned with a bypass route recommended by the Stantec Study in 1998-99. It, plus an earlier transportation report, the South Flamborough Transportation Study, talked about upgrading and expanding existing roads, such as Parkside, Centre Road and 5th Concession Road East but suggested that a bypass would also be needed to accommodate traffic as development came on stream.

Seferiades, Oliver and a group of other residents in the area want to know why the Stantec Study's findings appear to have been abandoned by the city even though they had reached the recommended route phase before the former Town of Flamborough was amalgamated with Hamilton.

"Let's not downsize the effects of a proper transportation network," Seferiades suggests. "Two studies have identified a need for a proper bypass. We have one chance to get this right."

But Mary Lou Tanner, Hamilton's manager of strategic and environmental planning, told the Review last week that the Stantec Study was not approved by any of the municipalities heading up the study including Flamborough, Burlington and Halton Region. Also, key environmental agencies such as Conservation Halton and the Niagara Escarpment Commission opposed the recommendation of the study, she added.

"There were a number of outstanding environmental issues to be resolved," Tanner said. Those issues remain today in the form of the Medad Life Science Area of Significance and the Lake Medad Valley Swamp provincially significant wetlands that lie north of Parkside Drive near Robson Road.

Seferiades argues that the impacts on environmentally significant areas can be mitigated without significantly changing the route that he prefers. He remains adamant that a completely new northerly route is the best option and the city's own report confirms that it would be less expensive than the route currently proposed.

Tanner counters that the northerly route won't solve the transportation problem that will result from new residential growth. If the road continues north of Parkside past Churchill Avenue and east of Robson, "It won't provide the transportation capacity needed," she insisted.

Seferiades remains frustrated by such statements.

"Show me the study, the numbers" to support those assertions, he said, adding that he asked for the substantiating figures at the September public meeting held by planners and consultants heading up the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Master Plan. "But no one could answer."

Halton Conservation and the Niagara Escarpment Commission have confirmed in writing that they support the preferred road alignments outlined in the current study. The next stage of the study (Phase 3) will concentrate on detailed road design.

North Waterdown residents drive for review of road planning process

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Opposition is mounting on the proposed east-west road that will traverse northern Waterdown as part of the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Master Plan study. As the Phase 2 report showing the preferred routes for an east-west road as well as a north-south road gets fine-tuned by staff before heading to city council early next year, residents along the eastern portion of the Parkside Drive area in Waterdown are becoming more vocal.

"I question the whole process," Al Seferiades said this week expressing his personal doubts that the public meetings held to date have been anything more than "just a formality." Steve Oliver, a Boulding Avenue area resident, echoes Seferiades' concerns. He remains unconvinced that planners recommending the route have given adequate consideration to the increased traffic that will cross the area if the new route is approved. "I think they should strongly consider the effect of the planned route on the east side of Parkside. The increased traffic will be a burden on our neighbourhood," he maintained.

The new transportation routes are being proposed to meet the traffic demands that Waterdown will face with the proposed addition of 6,500 homes over the next 10 years. The east-west route will run east of Hwy. 6, north of Parkside Drive and through the proposed Waterdown North subdivision near Parkside Drive and Centre Road before connecting with an expanded Parkside Drive east of Churchill Avenue. It will proceed easterly along Parkside before jogging south along the eastern boundary of Upcountry Estates and meeting Dundas Street (Hwy. 5).

Seferiades and Oliver prefer an alternative route, which planners looked at but discounted for a number of reasons, including environmental factors. Their preference would follow basically the same route in the western end of the proposed road but would see it continue north of Parkside well beyond Churchill Avenue not turning southward until it is east of Robson Road. It would then connect in a straight line with the new road along the eastern boundary of Upcountry Estates.

Their preference is closely aligned with a bypass route recommended by the Stantec Study in 1998-99. It, plus an earlier transportation report, the South Flamborough Transportation Study, talked about upgrading and expanding existing roads, such as Parkside, Centre Road and 5th Concession Road East but suggested that a bypass would also be needed to accommodate traffic as development came on stream.

Seferiades, Oliver and a group of other residents in the area want to know why the Stantec Study's findings appear to have been abandoned by the city even though they had reached the recommended route phase before the former Town of Flamborough was amalgamated with Hamilton.

"Let's not downsize the effects of a proper transportation network," Seferiades suggests. "Two studies have identified a need for a proper bypass. We have one chance to get this right."

But Mary Lou Tanner, Hamilton's manager of strategic and environmental planning, told the Review last week that the Stantec Study was not approved by any of the municipalities heading up the study including Flamborough, Burlington and Halton Region. Also, key environmental agencies such as Conservation Halton and the Niagara Escarpment Commission opposed the recommendation of the study, she added.

"There were a number of outstanding environmental issues to be resolved," Tanner said. Those issues remain today in the form of the Medad Life Science Area of Significance and the Lake Medad Valley Swamp provincially significant wetlands that lie north of Parkside Drive near Robson Road.

Seferiades argues that the impacts on environmentally significant areas can be mitigated without significantly changing the route that he prefers. He remains adamant that a completely new northerly route is the best option and the city's own report confirms that it would be less expensive than the route currently proposed.

Tanner counters that the northerly route won't solve the transportation problem that will result from new residential growth. If the road continues north of Parkside past Churchill Avenue and east of Robson, "It won't provide the transportation capacity needed," she insisted.

Seferiades remains frustrated by such statements.

"Show me the study, the numbers" to support those assertions, he said, adding that he asked for the substantiating figures at the September public meeting held by planners and consultants heading up the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Master Plan. "But no one could answer."

Halton Conservation and the Niagara Escarpment Commission have confirmed in writing that they support the preferred road alignments outlined in the current study. The next stage of the study (Phase 3) will concentrate on detailed road design.

North Waterdown residents drive for review of road planning process

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Opposition is mounting on the proposed east-west road that will traverse northern Waterdown as part of the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Master Plan study. As the Phase 2 report showing the preferred routes for an east-west road as well as a north-south road gets fine-tuned by staff before heading to city council early next year, residents along the eastern portion of the Parkside Drive area in Waterdown are becoming more vocal.

"I question the whole process," Al Seferiades said this week expressing his personal doubts that the public meetings held to date have been anything more than "just a formality." Steve Oliver, a Boulding Avenue area resident, echoes Seferiades' concerns. He remains unconvinced that planners recommending the route have given adequate consideration to the increased traffic that will cross the area if the new route is approved. "I think they should strongly consider the effect of the planned route on the east side of Parkside. The increased traffic will be a burden on our neighbourhood," he maintained.

The new transportation routes are being proposed to meet the traffic demands that Waterdown will face with the proposed addition of 6,500 homes over the next 10 years. The east-west route will run east of Hwy. 6, north of Parkside Drive and through the proposed Waterdown North subdivision near Parkside Drive and Centre Road before connecting with an expanded Parkside Drive east of Churchill Avenue. It will proceed easterly along Parkside before jogging south along the eastern boundary of Upcountry Estates and meeting Dundas Street (Hwy. 5).

Seferiades and Oliver prefer an alternative route, which planners looked at but discounted for a number of reasons, including environmental factors. Their preference would follow basically the same route in the western end of the proposed road but would see it continue north of Parkside well beyond Churchill Avenue not turning southward until it is east of Robson Road. It would then connect in a straight line with the new road along the eastern boundary of Upcountry Estates.

Their preference is closely aligned with a bypass route recommended by the Stantec Study in 1998-99. It, plus an earlier transportation report, the South Flamborough Transportation Study, talked about upgrading and expanding existing roads, such as Parkside, Centre Road and 5th Concession Road East but suggested that a bypass would also be needed to accommodate traffic as development came on stream.

Seferiades, Oliver and a group of other residents in the area want to know why the Stantec Study's findings appear to have been abandoned by the city even though they had reached the recommended route phase before the former Town of Flamborough was amalgamated with Hamilton.

"Let's not downsize the effects of a proper transportation network," Seferiades suggests. "Two studies have identified a need for a proper bypass. We have one chance to get this right."

But Mary Lou Tanner, Hamilton's manager of strategic and environmental planning, told the Review last week that the Stantec Study was not approved by any of the municipalities heading up the study including Flamborough, Burlington and Halton Region. Also, key environmental agencies such as Conservation Halton and the Niagara Escarpment Commission opposed the recommendation of the study, she added.

"There were a number of outstanding environmental issues to be resolved," Tanner said. Those issues remain today in the form of the Medad Life Science Area of Significance and the Lake Medad Valley Swamp provincially significant wetlands that lie north of Parkside Drive near Robson Road.

Seferiades argues that the impacts on environmentally significant areas can be mitigated without significantly changing the route that he prefers. He remains adamant that a completely new northerly route is the best option and the city's own report confirms that it would be less expensive than the route currently proposed.

Tanner counters that the northerly route won't solve the transportation problem that will result from new residential growth. If the road continues north of Parkside past Churchill Avenue and east of Robson, "It won't provide the transportation capacity needed," she insisted.

Seferiades remains frustrated by such statements.

"Show me the study, the numbers" to support those assertions, he said, adding that he asked for the substantiating figures at the September public meeting held by planners and consultants heading up the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Master Plan. "But no one could answer."

Halton Conservation and the Niagara Escarpment Commission have confirmed in writing that they support the preferred road alignments outlined in the current study. The next stage of the study (Phase 3) will concentrate on detailed road design.