City, province fund landfill remediation

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The city of Hamilton and the provincial government are spending nearly $38 million to remediate the city's 12 closed landfill sites.

In a progress report made to members of the public works and environment committee this week, Craig Murdoch, manager of waste disposal, said as of Oct. 1, 2005, over $28.5 million has been spent closing and testing the landfills. About $9.8 million remains in the various landfill accounts and ready to be spent until 2007. The city and the Ontario government split the $38 million cost.

Some of the landfill reserve accounts have been tapped out including sites in Stoney Creek, Binbrook, Dundas, Glanford and Stoney Creek. Still, city waste management staff continue to monitor and test all landfill sites, said Murdoch. Progress made on the landfills includes:

Removal and re-capping of exposed waste and seeding of 87 Acre Park in Stoney Creek in 2005. The property, which was involved in a legal dispute between the former city of Stoney Creek and the Environment Ministry, is now classified as a closed landfill site. The city will continue monitoring the dump into 2006.

The 7.5 hectare area in Ancaster, split by Highway 403, will be graded and capped in January 2006. Soccer fields are scheduled to be opened in late 2006 or early 2007. The leachate collection system was repaired in 2004. A groundwater study will be completed in 2006.

A risk assessment of the Beverly site was completed this year. Existing monitoring wells will be decommissioned by spring of 2006.

Located along Fletcher Road, near Kirk Road, the Binbrook site was fenced to comply with Environment Ministry regulations.

The 5.3 hectare site on Olympic Drive in Dundas, owned by the Royal Botanical Gardens, was closed in 1976. During routine monitoring, city staff found gas migration. A passive venting system was installed in 2004. Monitoring of the site continues.

The city will begin re-capping the Edgewood Road dump in 2006.

The Glanford site was fenced to comply with Environment Ministry regulations.

The Rennie and Brampton Street dumps received extensive remediation and the bulk of the funding after the city lost a legal fight in 1999 when leachate was found to be leaking into the Red Hill Creek. Clay capping was done on the Rennie site and a leachate collection system was installed around both landfills. Other jobs include building a gas barrier trench, relocating and redesigning the Red Hill Creek channel and re-vegetation of the slopes of both landfills. City staff and local groups are designing an end-use program and implementation plan by 2006.

The city stopped leachate from leaking from the Stoney Creek site in 2002-03. Grading and re-capping were completed this year.

A clay barrier was installed at the Upper Ottawa site in 2003 to prevent leachate from seeping out. Grading and a clay capping were done this year. In the spring of 2006, construction of a retaining wall and the installation of a leachate collection system extension will be completed

In 2005, the city installed a purged well and forcemain to prevent leakage at the West Hamilton site. Grading and clay capping will be conducted in 2006. Seeding is expected to be done in April, 2006, with a sports field opening in May 2006. The city will also remediate the east bank of the Chedoke Creek for 2006-2007.

City staff estimate it costs taxpayers about $400,000 per year to maintain the closed landfill sites.

City, province fund landfill remediation

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The city of Hamilton and the provincial government are spending nearly $38 million to remediate the city's 12 closed landfill sites.

In a progress report made to members of the public works and environment committee this week, Craig Murdoch, manager of waste disposal, said as of Oct. 1, 2005, over $28.5 million has been spent closing and testing the landfills. About $9.8 million remains in the various landfill accounts and ready to be spent until 2007. The city and the Ontario government split the $38 million cost.

Some of the landfill reserve accounts have been tapped out including sites in Stoney Creek, Binbrook, Dundas, Glanford and Stoney Creek. Still, city waste management staff continue to monitor and test all landfill sites, said Murdoch. Progress made on the landfills includes:

Removal and re-capping of exposed waste and seeding of 87 Acre Park in Stoney Creek in 2005. The property, which was involved in a legal dispute between the former city of Stoney Creek and the Environment Ministry, is now classified as a closed landfill site. The city will continue monitoring the dump into 2006.

The 7.5 hectare area in Ancaster, split by Highway 403, will be graded and capped in January 2006. Soccer fields are scheduled to be opened in late 2006 or early 2007. The leachate collection system was repaired in 2004. A groundwater study will be completed in 2006.

A risk assessment of the Beverly site was completed this year. Existing monitoring wells will be decommissioned by spring of 2006.

Located along Fletcher Road, near Kirk Road, the Binbrook site was fenced to comply with Environment Ministry regulations.

The 5.3 hectare site on Olympic Drive in Dundas, owned by the Royal Botanical Gardens, was closed in 1976. During routine monitoring, city staff found gas migration. A passive venting system was installed in 2004. Monitoring of the site continues.

The city will begin re-capping the Edgewood Road dump in 2006.

The Glanford site was fenced to comply with Environment Ministry regulations.

The Rennie and Brampton Street dumps received extensive remediation and the bulk of the funding after the city lost a legal fight in 1999 when leachate was found to be leaking into the Red Hill Creek. Clay capping was done on the Rennie site and a leachate collection system was installed around both landfills. Other jobs include building a gas barrier trench, relocating and redesigning the Red Hill Creek channel and re-vegetation of the slopes of both landfills. City staff and local groups are designing an end-use program and implementation plan by 2006.

The city stopped leachate from leaking from the Stoney Creek site in 2002-03. Grading and re-capping were completed this year.

A clay barrier was installed at the Upper Ottawa site in 2003 to prevent leachate from seeping out. Grading and a clay capping were done this year. In the spring of 2006, construction of a retaining wall and the installation of a leachate collection system extension will be completed

In 2005, the city installed a purged well and forcemain to prevent leakage at the West Hamilton site. Grading and clay capping will be conducted in 2006. Seeding is expected to be done in April, 2006, with a sports field opening in May 2006. The city will also remediate the east bank of the Chedoke Creek for 2006-2007.

City staff estimate it costs taxpayers about $400,000 per year to maintain the closed landfill sites.

City, province fund landfill remediation

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The city of Hamilton and the provincial government are spending nearly $38 million to remediate the city's 12 closed landfill sites.

In a progress report made to members of the public works and environment committee this week, Craig Murdoch, manager of waste disposal, said as of Oct. 1, 2005, over $28.5 million has been spent closing and testing the landfills. About $9.8 million remains in the various landfill accounts and ready to be spent until 2007. The city and the Ontario government split the $38 million cost.

Some of the landfill reserve accounts have been tapped out including sites in Stoney Creek, Binbrook, Dundas, Glanford and Stoney Creek. Still, city waste management staff continue to monitor and test all landfill sites, said Murdoch. Progress made on the landfills includes:

Removal and re-capping of exposed waste and seeding of 87 Acre Park in Stoney Creek in 2005. The property, which was involved in a legal dispute between the former city of Stoney Creek and the Environment Ministry, is now classified as a closed landfill site. The city will continue monitoring the dump into 2006.

The 7.5 hectare area in Ancaster, split by Highway 403, will be graded and capped in January 2006. Soccer fields are scheduled to be opened in late 2006 or early 2007. The leachate collection system was repaired in 2004. A groundwater study will be completed in 2006.

A risk assessment of the Beverly site was completed this year. Existing monitoring wells will be decommissioned by spring of 2006.

Located along Fletcher Road, near Kirk Road, the Binbrook site was fenced to comply with Environment Ministry regulations.

The 5.3 hectare site on Olympic Drive in Dundas, owned by the Royal Botanical Gardens, was closed in 1976. During routine monitoring, city staff found gas migration. A passive venting system was installed in 2004. Monitoring of the site continues.

The city will begin re-capping the Edgewood Road dump in 2006.

The Glanford site was fenced to comply with Environment Ministry regulations.

The Rennie and Brampton Street dumps received extensive remediation and the bulk of the funding after the city lost a legal fight in 1999 when leachate was found to be leaking into the Red Hill Creek. Clay capping was done on the Rennie site and a leachate collection system was installed around both landfills. Other jobs include building a gas barrier trench, relocating and redesigning the Red Hill Creek channel and re-vegetation of the slopes of both landfills. City staff and local groups are designing an end-use program and implementation plan by 2006.

The city stopped leachate from leaking from the Stoney Creek site in 2002-03. Grading and re-capping were completed this year.

A clay barrier was installed at the Upper Ottawa site in 2003 to prevent leachate from seeping out. Grading and a clay capping were done this year. In the spring of 2006, construction of a retaining wall and the installation of a leachate collection system extension will be completed

In 2005, the city installed a purged well and forcemain to prevent leakage at the West Hamilton site. Grading and clay capping will be conducted in 2006. Seeding is expected to be done in April, 2006, with a sports field opening in May 2006. The city will also remediate the east bank of the Chedoke Creek for 2006-2007.

City staff estimate it costs taxpayers about $400,000 per year to maintain the closed landfill sites.