Scales of justice are off balance

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

To many, the deal Karla Homolka was able to spin out of her involvement in the early '90s abduction and murder of schoolgirls Leslie Mahaffy and Kristen French was a miscarriage of justice.

Paul Bernardo's life sentence for his role in the abduction, torture and murder of his victims made sense from a scales of justice point of view - his life in exchange for those he had taken.

The public outcry and media firestorm that engulfed Homolka's July 4 release from prison was confirmation that her 12-year sentence still didn't sit well with many people.

Last week's Quebec court decision to grant Homolka the freedom to associate with convicted criminals, hold positions of authority over children under the age of 16, travel outside Quebec without notifying authorities and contact the families of her victims may be this case's greatest travesty.

The very notion that less than five months after her release from prison Homolka would be free to approach schoolchildren, consort with criminals - including Bernardo - and even pick up the phone or pay a visit to the Mahaffy or French families seems unfathomable.

We consider Justice James Brunton's decision to remove 14 court-imposed restrictions on Homolka's personal freedom far too much, too soon in a case that still haunts this community and Canadians in general.

Burlington MPP Cam Jackson blames Homolka's newfound freedom on Ontario Attorney General Michael Bryant. While Ontario Crown attorneys had been active participants in the original hearings to determine restrictions on Homolka following her release from prison, Jackson alleges Ontario was not even represented at the more recent appeal hearings that resulted in last Wednesday's removal of all the conditions that restricted Homolka's movement.

We agree with Jackson's statement that, "It is the job of the Attorney General to protect the families of the victims of Karla Homolka and the Ontario public is being victimized again by her."

Justice Brunton's ruling that, "She does not represent a real and imminent danger to commit a personal injury offence," is largely based on Homolka's time spent behind bars where the opportunity to re-offend was minimal.

We don't believe Homolka has earned the benefit of the doubt.

With this week's failed attempt to appeal Brunton's decision, the scales of justice have swung far too much in the favour of those involved in such heinous acts as murder.

The Mahaffy and French families have every right to question whether giving Homolka the freedom to interact with criminals and young people is in the best interest of anyone but Karla.

Scales of justice are off balance

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

To many, the deal Karla Homolka was able to spin out of her involvement in the early '90s abduction and murder of schoolgirls Leslie Mahaffy and Kristen French was a miscarriage of justice.

Paul Bernardo's life sentence for his role in the abduction, torture and murder of his victims made sense from a scales of justice point of view - his life in exchange for those he had taken.

The public outcry and media firestorm that engulfed Homolka's July 4 release from prison was confirmation that her 12-year sentence still didn't sit well with many people.

Last week's Quebec court decision to grant Homolka the freedom to associate with convicted criminals, hold positions of authority over children under the age of 16, travel outside Quebec without notifying authorities and contact the families of her victims may be this case's greatest travesty.

The very notion that less than five months after her release from prison Homolka would be free to approach schoolchildren, consort with criminals - including Bernardo - and even pick up the phone or pay a visit to the Mahaffy or French families seems unfathomable.

We consider Justice James Brunton's decision to remove 14 court-imposed restrictions on Homolka's personal freedom far too much, too soon in a case that still haunts this community and Canadians in general.

Burlington MPP Cam Jackson blames Homolka's newfound freedom on Ontario Attorney General Michael Bryant. While Ontario Crown attorneys had been active participants in the original hearings to determine restrictions on Homolka following her release from prison, Jackson alleges Ontario was not even represented at the more recent appeal hearings that resulted in last Wednesday's removal of all the conditions that restricted Homolka's movement.

We agree with Jackson's statement that, "It is the job of the Attorney General to protect the families of the victims of Karla Homolka and the Ontario public is being victimized again by her."

Justice Brunton's ruling that, "She does not represent a real and imminent danger to commit a personal injury offence," is largely based on Homolka's time spent behind bars where the opportunity to re-offend was minimal.

We don't believe Homolka has earned the benefit of the doubt.

With this week's failed attempt to appeal Brunton's decision, the scales of justice have swung far too much in the favour of those involved in such heinous acts as murder.

The Mahaffy and French families have every right to question whether giving Homolka the freedom to interact with criminals and young people is in the best interest of anyone but Karla.

Scales of justice are off balance

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

To many, the deal Karla Homolka was able to spin out of her involvement in the early '90s abduction and murder of schoolgirls Leslie Mahaffy and Kristen French was a miscarriage of justice.

Paul Bernardo's life sentence for his role in the abduction, torture and murder of his victims made sense from a scales of justice point of view - his life in exchange for those he had taken.

The public outcry and media firestorm that engulfed Homolka's July 4 release from prison was confirmation that her 12-year sentence still didn't sit well with many people.

Last week's Quebec court decision to grant Homolka the freedom to associate with convicted criminals, hold positions of authority over children under the age of 16, travel outside Quebec without notifying authorities and contact the families of her victims may be this case's greatest travesty.

The very notion that less than five months after her release from prison Homolka would be free to approach schoolchildren, consort with criminals - including Bernardo - and even pick up the phone or pay a visit to the Mahaffy or French families seems unfathomable.

We consider Justice James Brunton's decision to remove 14 court-imposed restrictions on Homolka's personal freedom far too much, too soon in a case that still haunts this community and Canadians in general.

Burlington MPP Cam Jackson blames Homolka's newfound freedom on Ontario Attorney General Michael Bryant. While Ontario Crown attorneys had been active participants in the original hearings to determine restrictions on Homolka following her release from prison, Jackson alleges Ontario was not even represented at the more recent appeal hearings that resulted in last Wednesday's removal of all the conditions that restricted Homolka's movement.

We agree with Jackson's statement that, "It is the job of the Attorney General to protect the families of the victims of Karla Homolka and the Ontario public is being victimized again by her."

Justice Brunton's ruling that, "She does not represent a real and imminent danger to commit a personal injury offence," is largely based on Homolka's time spent behind bars where the opportunity to re-offend was minimal.

We don't believe Homolka has earned the benefit of the doubt.

With this week's failed attempt to appeal Brunton's decision, the scales of justice have swung far too much in the favour of those involved in such heinous acts as murder.

The Mahaffy and French families have every right to question whether giving Homolka the freedom to interact with criminals and young people is in the best interest of anyone but Karla.