Conservative campaign trail leads to a sweet stop in Waterdown

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale federal Conservative Party candidate David Sweet was first off the mark in official campaign appearances, this week landing in Waterdown with Alberta MP and Conservative Critic for Citizenship and Immigration Diane Ablonczy. He met with about a dozen party faithful at Pause Awhile Tea Room.

The first topic of discussion focused on media image and how to improve it - not Sweet's, but that of leader, Stephen Harper.

"(Harper) is an introvert, and for introverts, interacting with people drains them - unlike extroverts, who are energized by people," said Ablonczy, drawing a comparison between the Harper and a charismatic Liberal icon Pierre Trudeau. "Trudeau was not really a people person, but once people got to know him they respected his intellect. (Harper) is an 'ideas' person, not a warm and fuzzy people person, but so what?

"We're not picking somebody to kiss babies. We're picking someone to run the country."

Sweet, who was accompanied to the meeting by his wife, Almut, noted that his campaign plan this time around is to "get out and talk to as many people as possible." He's also relishing the feeling of having a bit more control over his schedule than in the 2003 election.

"In the last election, we were a six-month-old party,"' he said. "I remember a feeling of warp speed. There was a massive amount of activity to get our wagons in a row."

Also up for discussion in Tuesday's meeting was the Liberal promise to expand national daycare funding, versus the Conservatives' Child Care Allowance proposal.

"We based our numbers on a modest surplus and we got hammered," Ablonczy said of the opposition's reaction to the tax credit plan that would put $1,200 a year into the pockets of parents. "But no one has taken the Liberals to task on their numbers."

And while child care has been one of the hot-button issues out of the starting block in the campaign, one local resident questioned the focus, pointing out that in an aging society, constituents are more likely to be looking for more commitment from the major parties to programs for seniors.

"In 10 years, it won't be child care issues, it will be elder care," Ablonczy agreed.

Conservative campaign trail leads to a sweet stop in Waterdown

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale federal Conservative Party candidate David Sweet was first off the mark in official campaign appearances, this week landing in Waterdown with Alberta MP and Conservative Critic for Citizenship and Immigration Diane Ablonczy. He met with about a dozen party faithful at Pause Awhile Tea Room.

The first topic of discussion focused on media image and how to improve it - not Sweet's, but that of leader, Stephen Harper.

"(Harper) is an introvert, and for introverts, interacting with people drains them - unlike extroverts, who are energized by people," said Ablonczy, drawing a comparison between the Harper and a charismatic Liberal icon Pierre Trudeau. "Trudeau was not really a people person, but once people got to know him they respected his intellect. (Harper) is an 'ideas' person, not a warm and fuzzy people person, but so what?

"We're not picking somebody to kiss babies. We're picking someone to run the country."

Sweet, who was accompanied to the meeting by his wife, Almut, noted that his campaign plan this time around is to "get out and talk to as many people as possible." He's also relishing the feeling of having a bit more control over his schedule than in the 2003 election.

"In the last election, we were a six-month-old party,"' he said. "I remember a feeling of warp speed. There was a massive amount of activity to get our wagons in a row."

Also up for discussion in Tuesday's meeting was the Liberal promise to expand national daycare funding, versus the Conservatives' Child Care Allowance proposal.

"We based our numbers on a modest surplus and we got hammered," Ablonczy said of the opposition's reaction to the tax credit plan that would put $1,200 a year into the pockets of parents. "But no one has taken the Liberals to task on their numbers."

And while child care has been one of the hot-button issues out of the starting block in the campaign, one local resident questioned the focus, pointing out that in an aging society, constituents are more likely to be looking for more commitment from the major parties to programs for seniors.

"In 10 years, it won't be child care issues, it will be elder care," Ablonczy agreed.

Conservative campaign trail leads to a sweet stop in Waterdown

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale federal Conservative Party candidate David Sweet was first off the mark in official campaign appearances, this week landing in Waterdown with Alberta MP and Conservative Critic for Citizenship and Immigration Diane Ablonczy. He met with about a dozen party faithful at Pause Awhile Tea Room.

The first topic of discussion focused on media image and how to improve it - not Sweet's, but that of leader, Stephen Harper.

"(Harper) is an introvert, and for introverts, interacting with people drains them - unlike extroverts, who are energized by people," said Ablonczy, drawing a comparison between the Harper and a charismatic Liberal icon Pierre Trudeau. "Trudeau was not really a people person, but once people got to know him they respected his intellect. (Harper) is an 'ideas' person, not a warm and fuzzy people person, but so what?

"We're not picking somebody to kiss babies. We're picking someone to run the country."

Sweet, who was accompanied to the meeting by his wife, Almut, noted that his campaign plan this time around is to "get out and talk to as many people as possible." He's also relishing the feeling of having a bit more control over his schedule than in the 2003 election.

"In the last election, we were a six-month-old party,"' he said. "I remember a feeling of warp speed. There was a massive amount of activity to get our wagons in a row."

Also up for discussion in Tuesday's meeting was the Liberal promise to expand national daycare funding, versus the Conservatives' Child Care Allowance proposal.

"We based our numbers on a modest surplus and we got hammered," Ablonczy said of the opposition's reaction to the tax credit plan that would put $1,200 a year into the pockets of parents. "But no one has taken the Liberals to task on their numbers."

And while child care has been one of the hot-button issues out of the starting block in the campaign, one local resident questioned the focus, pointing out that in an aging society, constituents are more likely to be looking for more commitment from the major parties to programs for seniors.

"In 10 years, it won't be child care issues, it will be elder care," Ablonczy agreed.