New cops hit the beat in March

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Hamilton Police Service (HPS) is hoping to quell a common complaint of suburban residents. With more manpower coming onstream early in 2006, the force expects to improve police visibility and response times in Flamborough.

Citizens, particularly in the rural areas of Flamborough, have long complained that they wait 45 minutes to an hour- and often longer - before police respond to calls about break-ins and other criminal activity. Some have even charged that they seldom, if ever, see a police car patrolling the area.

But the formation of a new beat on Hamilton Mountain will change things considerably starting March 1, Deputy Police Chief Tom Marlor said this week. That's when 10 new, fully-trained officers will come on the scene. Five will be assigned to a new beat on the Mountain and five will be stationed in downtown Hamilton.

Because Flamborough is part of the Mountain division, people often complain that response times are longer as officers are often answering calls in far-off Ancaster or Dundas when a call comes in from Flamborough. With a new beat in place, "There'll be increased visibility and presence in the community," Marlor said, because more police in the division will free up those based in Flamborough. As a result, response times are also expected to improve, he said.

Flamborough will continue to have four beat cars, but when the new Mountain beat is established they are expected to be in this area more often than is currently the case.

The new police officers, who will earn about $30,000 annually as a starting salary, are part of a new provincial government initiative called the Safe Communities Officers Partnership Program (SCOPP). Under the program, the HPS will get 37 new officers. The Ontario government will pay 50 per cent of their salaries up to a maximum of $35,000 per year.

The HPS hired 10 officers in September, but they attended the Ontario Police College for three months and are currently on a three-month training program before being assigned to duty. In mid-January, another 10 officers will be recruited, with the final 17 coming on staff in September, 2006. The increased manpower will allow police to target a number of areas.

"The emphasis of our request to the province (as part of the SCOPP initiative) was to provide enhanced service to our citizens by increasing the number of patrol officers," said HPS Police Chief Brian Mullan.

"With the new officers, we will improve traffic safety, increase our resources in our Guns and Weapons Unit and attack organized crime groups involved in marijuana grow operations and the trafficking of narcotics," he added.

Before hiring the new officers, the HPS had a complement of 708 sworn police officers.

It is the sixth largest police service in Ontario and provides services to over 512,000 residents.

New cops hit the beat in March

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Hamilton Police Service (HPS) is hoping to quell a common complaint of suburban residents. With more manpower coming onstream early in 2006, the force expects to improve police visibility and response times in Flamborough.

Citizens, particularly in the rural areas of Flamborough, have long complained that they wait 45 minutes to an hour- and often longer - before police respond to calls about break-ins and other criminal activity. Some have even charged that they seldom, if ever, see a police car patrolling the area.

But the formation of a new beat on Hamilton Mountain will change things considerably starting March 1, Deputy Police Chief Tom Marlor said this week. That's when 10 new, fully-trained officers will come on the scene. Five will be assigned to a new beat on the Mountain and five will be stationed in downtown Hamilton.

Because Flamborough is part of the Mountain division, people often complain that response times are longer as officers are often answering calls in far-off Ancaster or Dundas when a call comes in from Flamborough. With a new beat in place, "There'll be increased visibility and presence in the community," Marlor said, because more police in the division will free up those based in Flamborough. As a result, response times are also expected to improve, he said.

Flamborough will continue to have four beat cars, but when the new Mountain beat is established they are expected to be in this area more often than is currently the case.

The new police officers, who will earn about $30,000 annually as a starting salary, are part of a new provincial government initiative called the Safe Communities Officers Partnership Program (SCOPP). Under the program, the HPS will get 37 new officers. The Ontario government will pay 50 per cent of their salaries up to a maximum of $35,000 per year.

The HPS hired 10 officers in September, but they attended the Ontario Police College for three months and are currently on a three-month training program before being assigned to duty. In mid-January, another 10 officers will be recruited, with the final 17 coming on staff in September, 2006. The increased manpower will allow police to target a number of areas.

"The emphasis of our request to the province (as part of the SCOPP initiative) was to provide enhanced service to our citizens by increasing the number of patrol officers," said HPS Police Chief Brian Mullan.

"With the new officers, we will improve traffic safety, increase our resources in our Guns and Weapons Unit and attack organized crime groups involved in marijuana grow operations and the trafficking of narcotics," he added.

Before hiring the new officers, the HPS had a complement of 708 sworn police officers.

It is the sixth largest police service in Ontario and provides services to over 512,000 residents.

New cops hit the beat in March

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Hamilton Police Service (HPS) is hoping to quell a common complaint of suburban residents. With more manpower coming onstream early in 2006, the force expects to improve police visibility and response times in Flamborough.

Citizens, particularly in the rural areas of Flamborough, have long complained that they wait 45 minutes to an hour- and often longer - before police respond to calls about break-ins and other criminal activity. Some have even charged that they seldom, if ever, see a police car patrolling the area.

But the formation of a new beat on Hamilton Mountain will change things considerably starting March 1, Deputy Police Chief Tom Marlor said this week. That's when 10 new, fully-trained officers will come on the scene. Five will be assigned to a new beat on the Mountain and five will be stationed in downtown Hamilton.

Because Flamborough is part of the Mountain division, people often complain that response times are longer as officers are often answering calls in far-off Ancaster or Dundas when a call comes in from Flamborough. With a new beat in place, "There'll be increased visibility and presence in the community," Marlor said, because more police in the division will free up those based in Flamborough. As a result, response times are also expected to improve, he said.

Flamborough will continue to have four beat cars, but when the new Mountain beat is established they are expected to be in this area more often than is currently the case.

The new police officers, who will earn about $30,000 annually as a starting salary, are part of a new provincial government initiative called the Safe Communities Officers Partnership Program (SCOPP). Under the program, the HPS will get 37 new officers. The Ontario government will pay 50 per cent of their salaries up to a maximum of $35,000 per year.

The HPS hired 10 officers in September, but they attended the Ontario Police College for three months and are currently on a three-month training program before being assigned to duty. In mid-January, another 10 officers will be recruited, with the final 17 coming on staff in September, 2006. The increased manpower will allow police to target a number of areas.

"The emphasis of our request to the province (as part of the SCOPP initiative) was to provide enhanced service to our citizens by increasing the number of patrol officers," said HPS Police Chief Brian Mullan.

"With the new officers, we will improve traffic safety, increase our resources in our Guns and Weapons Unit and attack organized crime groups involved in marijuana grow operations and the trafficking of narcotics," he added.

Before hiring the new officers, the HPS had a complement of 708 sworn police officers.

It is the sixth largest police service in Ontario and provides services to over 512,000 residents.