Carlisle resident honoured for lifetime of agricultural service

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For decades, Byron Beeler has volunteered his time and expertise to boost the agricultural community; this year, the agricultural community gave a little something back to the Carlisle resident, who now runs his own home-based consulting business.

Beeler, a native of Nova Scotia, was named to the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame on November 6, at the Ontario Royal Winter Fair.

The honour acknowledges Beeler's career, which includes a range of activities in several areas, including horticulture, seed production and animal health, and contributions to agricultural advancement on the regional, provincial, national and global levels.

After completing studies at Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Beeler obtained his B.Sc. (Agr.) from McGill University before moving to Ontario and launching a career with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food, including a stint in Picton, where he ran an early morning radio show for local farmers.

"There were 80 apple growers, and they would start phoning at seven in the morning, at noon and in the evening," Beeler recalled of his early days on the beat as a horticultural crop specialist. "I approached the station and arranged a hookup with the morning man for five minutes." The phone calls to his house tapered off after that.

Beeler's government service continued in Vineland, and then as Director of Soils and Crops for the province. His growing interest in seed production and breeding led him to take a position in the private sector, with Stewart Seeds. He also became active in the Canadian Seed Trade Association and became an advocate of Plant Breeders Rights; his vision and leadership led to the eventual passage of that Act in 1990.

Beeler showed an ability to express ideas clearly and simply, early on becoming involved in mentoring and leading in 4-H - a relationship that continued through higher levels as his own career progressed.

Beeler is especially pleased that, along with his induction into the Hall of Fame, the "Byron and Katherine Beeler Leadership and Citizenship Endowment Fund" has been created in his and his wife's name.

"To me, the 4-H movement is an incredibly strong movement for youth," he said. "Today in Ontario, there are 1,000 clubs and 7,000 club members; there are 1,500 volunteers. My hat's off to all those volunteers."

He points out that his wife's name on the endowment fund reflects her support and commitment through his long career.

"Katherine really made my career possible," he noted. "She took care of all those things, our home and family, so I could spend time on my career. She did a tremendous amount of entertaining and taking care of guests."

In addition to career advancements with Stewart Seeds (which later merged with Funk's by Ciba-Geigy) that included general manager of the Seed Division, Vice President, Agricultural Division and President of Novartis Animal Health Inc., Beeler also continued to hold several association positions. His CV includes president of the Ontario Institute of Agrologists, committee chair in the Canadian Agricultural Chemicals Association, president of the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, member of the Dean's Advisory Council of OAC, OVC and Macdonald College and chair of the Equine Guelph Advisory Council.

Beeler doesn't hesitate when asked the secret of his success through his long career.

"I've been so fortunate to meet so many wonderful people, he said. "There's a saying: if you see a turtle on a fencepost, you know it didn't get there by itself. That sums up my career."

From associates in the government and private sectors, to volunteers and even people he coached minor hockey with, Beeler marvels at the connections he's made - and continues to make.

"The bottom line is, people make the difference," he said.

Carlisle resident honoured for lifetime of agricultural service

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For decades, Byron Beeler has volunteered his time and expertise to boost the agricultural community; this year, the agricultural community gave a little something back to the Carlisle resident, who now runs his own home-based consulting business.

Beeler, a native of Nova Scotia, was named to the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame on November 6, at the Ontario Royal Winter Fair.

The honour acknowledges Beeler's career, which includes a range of activities in several areas, including horticulture, seed production and animal health, and contributions to agricultural advancement on the regional, provincial, national and global levels.

After completing studies at Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Beeler obtained his B.Sc. (Agr.) from McGill University before moving to Ontario and launching a career with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food, including a stint in Picton, where he ran an early morning radio show for local farmers.

"There were 80 apple growers, and they would start phoning at seven in the morning, at noon and in the evening," Beeler recalled of his early days on the beat as a horticultural crop specialist. "I approached the station and arranged a hookup with the morning man for five minutes." The phone calls to his house tapered off after that.

Beeler's government service continued in Vineland, and then as Director of Soils and Crops for the province. His growing interest in seed production and breeding led him to take a position in the private sector, with Stewart Seeds. He also became active in the Canadian Seed Trade Association and became an advocate of Plant Breeders Rights; his vision and leadership led to the eventual passage of that Act in 1990.

Beeler showed an ability to express ideas clearly and simply, early on becoming involved in mentoring and leading in 4-H - a relationship that continued through higher levels as his own career progressed.

Beeler is especially pleased that, along with his induction into the Hall of Fame, the "Byron and Katherine Beeler Leadership and Citizenship Endowment Fund" has been created in his and his wife's name.

"To me, the 4-H movement is an incredibly strong movement for youth," he said. "Today in Ontario, there are 1,000 clubs and 7,000 club members; there are 1,500 volunteers. My hat's off to all those volunteers."

He points out that his wife's name on the endowment fund reflects her support and commitment through his long career.

"Katherine really made my career possible," he noted. "She took care of all those things, our home and family, so I could spend time on my career. She did a tremendous amount of entertaining and taking care of guests."

In addition to career advancements with Stewart Seeds (which later merged with Funk's by Ciba-Geigy) that included general manager of the Seed Division, Vice President, Agricultural Division and President of Novartis Animal Health Inc., Beeler also continued to hold several association positions. His CV includes president of the Ontario Institute of Agrologists, committee chair in the Canadian Agricultural Chemicals Association, president of the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, member of the Dean's Advisory Council of OAC, OVC and Macdonald College and chair of the Equine Guelph Advisory Council.

Beeler doesn't hesitate when asked the secret of his success through his long career.

"I've been so fortunate to meet so many wonderful people, he said. "There's a saying: if you see a turtle on a fencepost, you know it didn't get there by itself. That sums up my career."

From associates in the government and private sectors, to volunteers and even people he coached minor hockey with, Beeler marvels at the connections he's made - and continues to make.

"The bottom line is, people make the difference," he said.

Carlisle resident honoured for lifetime of agricultural service

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

For decades, Byron Beeler has volunteered his time and expertise to boost the agricultural community; this year, the agricultural community gave a little something back to the Carlisle resident, who now runs his own home-based consulting business.

Beeler, a native of Nova Scotia, was named to the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame on November 6, at the Ontario Royal Winter Fair.

The honour acknowledges Beeler's career, which includes a range of activities in several areas, including horticulture, seed production and animal health, and contributions to agricultural advancement on the regional, provincial, national and global levels.

After completing studies at Nova Scotia Agricultural College, Beeler obtained his B.Sc. (Agr.) from McGill University before moving to Ontario and launching a career with the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food, including a stint in Picton, where he ran an early morning radio show for local farmers.

"There were 80 apple growers, and they would start phoning at seven in the morning, at noon and in the evening," Beeler recalled of his early days on the beat as a horticultural crop specialist. "I approached the station and arranged a hookup with the morning man for five minutes." The phone calls to his house tapered off after that.

Beeler's government service continued in Vineland, and then as Director of Soils and Crops for the province. His growing interest in seed production and breeding led him to take a position in the private sector, with Stewart Seeds. He also became active in the Canadian Seed Trade Association and became an advocate of Plant Breeders Rights; his vision and leadership led to the eventual passage of that Act in 1990.

Beeler showed an ability to express ideas clearly and simply, early on becoming involved in mentoring and leading in 4-H - a relationship that continued through higher levels as his own career progressed.

Beeler is especially pleased that, along with his induction into the Hall of Fame, the "Byron and Katherine Beeler Leadership and Citizenship Endowment Fund" has been created in his and his wife's name.

"To me, the 4-H movement is an incredibly strong movement for youth," he said. "Today in Ontario, there are 1,000 clubs and 7,000 club members; there are 1,500 volunteers. My hat's off to all those volunteers."

He points out that his wife's name on the endowment fund reflects her support and commitment through his long career.

"Katherine really made my career possible," he noted. "She took care of all those things, our home and family, so I could spend time on my career. She did a tremendous amount of entertaining and taking care of guests."

In addition to career advancements with Stewart Seeds (which later merged with Funk's by Ciba-Geigy) that included general manager of the Seed Division, Vice President, Agricultural Division and President of Novartis Animal Health Inc., Beeler also continued to hold several association positions. His CV includes president of the Ontario Institute of Agrologists, committee chair in the Canadian Agricultural Chemicals Association, president of the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, member of the Dean's Advisory Council of OAC, OVC and Macdonald College and chair of the Equine Guelph Advisory Council.

Beeler doesn't hesitate when asked the secret of his success through his long career.

"I've been so fortunate to meet so many wonderful people, he said. "There's a saying: if you see a turtle on a fencepost, you know it didn't get there by itself. That sums up my career."

From associates in the government and private sectors, to volunteers and even people he coached minor hockey with, Beeler marvels at the connections he's made - and continues to make.

"The bottom line is, people make the difference," he said.