Policing model aims to put cops back on the beat in Flamborough

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Flamborough residents can expect a new level of police service in the New Year.

Hamilton Police Service has been approved to roll out a new system of policing, the Neighbourhood Safety Project (NSP). Under this new model, Division 3, which includes Hamilton Mountain, Glanbrook, Ancaster, Dundas and Flamborough, will be split into four quadrants, each of which will be overseen by a sergeant. Flamborough will be teamed with about half of Ancaster to form one quadrant, led by Sergeant Dan Welch.

The plan calls for a more intelligent approach to policing -one that will see beat officers spend more time on the streets.

NSP has been a pilot project in downtown Division 2 for the past year, with positive results, said Welch.

The plan reconfigures the responsibilities of officers. For instance, a special unit will be used to take reports after a crime has already taken place or at the scene of automobile accidents. This lengthy procedure often ties up beat cops for hours in a shift. A school liaison officer will handle offenses committed within schools.

That puts beat cops on the streets, in the hopes of catching more criminals in the act. Welch also hopes it will allow for better relations between police and the public, because it will allow officers more time to interact with the public they serve.

"It's proactive patrol," said Welch. "We hope it will prevent more crimes."

NSP replaces the current model, in which one Community Response Officer oversees an entire division.

Although the new model requires the employment of three additional sergeants, Welch is hopeful that residents will get better value for their money, in the form of higher police visibility, and lower crime. All four sergeants will work together at the Mountain Station, to form the brains behind the force. By working together, they can share records and information, which will allow them to form an intelligently co-ordinated strategy to target problem areas, such as arranging speed traps.

Dividing the division allows the sergeants to become intimately aware of concerns within their area. Flamborough residents, for instance, are concerned with traffic issues, particularly speeding through Waterdown and along the Concession roads.

Youth issues, such as drug use in local parks, also tops the list of concerns, noted Welch.

The NSP isn't a new idea. It has been in practice in the downtown for a year, and committee meetings have been underway since last spring to expand the program city-wide, said Welch.

Although the force has been altered, the community will be able to interact with it as usual. The public will still be able to report crimes to the Community Policing Centre in the Municipal Service Centre. Volunteers and officers will be available to take reports, but the faces will be changing. Officer Jillian Robinson is being reassigned to Limeridge Mall, where she's been asked to mentor other community service officers. Ron Yates, an officer with 28 years of experience, will take her place.

Policing model aims to put cops back on the beat in Flamborough

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Flamborough residents can expect a new level of police service in the New Year.

Hamilton Police Service has been approved to roll out a new system of policing, the Neighbourhood Safety Project (NSP). Under this new model, Division 3, which includes Hamilton Mountain, Glanbrook, Ancaster, Dundas and Flamborough, will be split into four quadrants, each of which will be overseen by a sergeant. Flamborough will be teamed with about half of Ancaster to form one quadrant, led by Sergeant Dan Welch.

The plan calls for a more intelligent approach to policing -one that will see beat officers spend more time on the streets.

NSP has been a pilot project in downtown Division 2 for the past year, with positive results, said Welch.

The plan reconfigures the responsibilities of officers. For instance, a special unit will be used to take reports after a crime has already taken place or at the scene of automobile accidents. This lengthy procedure often ties up beat cops for hours in a shift. A school liaison officer will handle offenses committed within schools.

That puts beat cops on the streets, in the hopes of catching more criminals in the act. Welch also hopes it will allow for better relations between police and the public, because it will allow officers more time to interact with the public they serve.

"It's proactive patrol," said Welch. "We hope it will prevent more crimes."

NSP replaces the current model, in which one Community Response Officer oversees an entire division.

Although the new model requires the employment of three additional sergeants, Welch is hopeful that residents will get better value for their money, in the form of higher police visibility, and lower crime. All four sergeants will work together at the Mountain Station, to form the brains behind the force. By working together, they can share records and information, which will allow them to form an intelligently co-ordinated strategy to target problem areas, such as arranging speed traps.

Dividing the division allows the sergeants to become intimately aware of concerns within their area. Flamborough residents, for instance, are concerned with traffic issues, particularly speeding through Waterdown and along the Concession roads.

Youth issues, such as drug use in local parks, also tops the list of concerns, noted Welch.

The NSP isn't a new idea. It has been in practice in the downtown for a year, and committee meetings have been underway since last spring to expand the program city-wide, said Welch.

Although the force has been altered, the community will be able to interact with it as usual. The public will still be able to report crimes to the Community Policing Centre in the Municipal Service Centre. Volunteers and officers will be available to take reports, but the faces will be changing. Officer Jillian Robinson is being reassigned to Limeridge Mall, where she's been asked to mentor other community service officers. Ron Yates, an officer with 28 years of experience, will take her place.

Policing model aims to put cops back on the beat in Flamborough

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Flamborough residents can expect a new level of police service in the New Year.

Hamilton Police Service has been approved to roll out a new system of policing, the Neighbourhood Safety Project (NSP). Under this new model, Division 3, which includes Hamilton Mountain, Glanbrook, Ancaster, Dundas and Flamborough, will be split into four quadrants, each of which will be overseen by a sergeant. Flamborough will be teamed with about half of Ancaster to form one quadrant, led by Sergeant Dan Welch.

The plan calls for a more intelligent approach to policing -one that will see beat officers spend more time on the streets.

NSP has been a pilot project in downtown Division 2 for the past year, with positive results, said Welch.

The plan reconfigures the responsibilities of officers. For instance, a special unit will be used to take reports after a crime has already taken place or at the scene of automobile accidents. This lengthy procedure often ties up beat cops for hours in a shift. A school liaison officer will handle offenses committed within schools.

That puts beat cops on the streets, in the hopes of catching more criminals in the act. Welch also hopes it will allow for better relations between police and the public, because it will allow officers more time to interact with the public they serve.

"It's proactive patrol," said Welch. "We hope it will prevent more crimes."

NSP replaces the current model, in which one Community Response Officer oversees an entire division.

Although the new model requires the employment of three additional sergeants, Welch is hopeful that residents will get better value for their money, in the form of higher police visibility, and lower crime. All four sergeants will work together at the Mountain Station, to form the brains behind the force. By working together, they can share records and information, which will allow them to form an intelligently co-ordinated strategy to target problem areas, such as arranging speed traps.

Dividing the division allows the sergeants to become intimately aware of concerns within their area. Flamborough residents, for instance, are concerned with traffic issues, particularly speeding through Waterdown and along the Concession roads.

Youth issues, such as drug use in local parks, also tops the list of concerns, noted Welch.

The NSP isn't a new idea. It has been in practice in the downtown for a year, and committee meetings have been underway since last spring to expand the program city-wide, said Welch.

Although the force has been altered, the community will be able to interact with it as usual. The public will still be able to report crimes to the Community Policing Centre in the Municipal Service Centre. Volunteers and officers will be available to take reports, but the faces will be changing. Officer Jillian Robinson is being reassigned to Limeridge Mall, where she's been asked to mentor other community service officers. Ron Yates, an officer with 28 years of experience, will take her place.