The candidates: in their own words

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Review asked the four candidates in the federal Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding what measures their government would take to enforce and protect international trade laws. Here's what they had to say.

* * *

David Januczkowski, Green Party of Canada

The Green Party believes in fair trade that maintains our sovereignty, not free trade that often puts foreign business interests first, and leads to rapid environmental degradation and human rights abuses in developing countries.

We would renegotiate our multilateral trade agreements to include fair trade tariffs that protect human rights and global ecosystems and terminate the investor-state dispute mechanism in NAFTA that allows foreign investors compensation for lost profits from our government if we pass laws to protect our environment.

We would propose reforming the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank so that these institutions would be placed under the authority of the UN General Assembly.

The Green Party would shift the focus away from free trade and multi-national corporatism to fair trade and the ability to govern ourselves. We would take steps to make Canada more self-sufficient in order to protect future generations of Canadians.

* * *

Dr. Gordon Guyatt, NDP

Canada surrendered excessive sovereignty in the North American Free Trade Agreement. Chapter 11, which allows foreign companies to sue our government for actions that damage their interests, is a particular problem.

The United States negotiates trade deals with tough regulations. They then enforce these regulations on trading partners, while violating the regulations themselves. American actions on softwood lumber are one example of this behaviour.

Canada must negotiate modifications of NAFTA, particularly Chapter 11. We must clarify that our social programs are out of bounds for American application of NAFTA rules.

Trade wars damage the interests of all participating countries. Nevertheless, we cannot allow the United States to violate trade rules with impunity. The U.S. wants Canadian energy resources badly. While a measure of last resort, if the U.S. refuses to adhere to established rules, Canada should limit or apply conditions to exports of Canadian fossil fuels.

* * *

MP Russ Powers, Liberal

With one in four Canadian jobs relying on international trade, it is imperative that a rules-based system be followed. A Liberal government will fight to have Canadian trade agreements protected, investments secured and the rule of law respected. We will succeed through increased advocacy, litigation and, in appropriate circumstances, retaliation.

This fall, our Liberal government announced the Can-Trade strategy that will add $12 million dollars to advocacy efforts, thereby strengthening our ability to monitor and enforce existing agreements such as the NAFTA and WTO.

We will continue to engage emerging markets like China and India with investment protection agreements to secure Canadian investments abroad.

Canada has continued to win both NAFTA and WTO panel decisions in the softwood lumber dispute; this proves that when the Liberals have stood up for Canada, we have won.

* * *

David Sweet, Conservative

In an increasingly competitive global economy, trade remains the key to future prosperity in Canada.

A Conservative government will act where the Liberals have failed: in defending foresters, farmers, and other primary producers against unfounded trade challenges while also working to open up new markets in the Americas and the Asia-Pacific region.

The Liberals have had 12 years to act and have squandered that time - only raising the ire of our trading partners when it serves their own political gain. That's not how you defend our national interests.

Our campaign is about Standing up for Canada at home and abroad. Canada needs a government that will stand up for our values of freedom, fairness, and compassion. That means a democratic government at home that respects all of our provinces, and defending our national interests and values abroad through a stronger military and a tougher stand on international trade disputes.

* * *

Review readers are invited to suggest questions for the "In Their Own Words" feature, which will run weekly until the federal election on January 23.

To have your question considered, please forward it to editor@flamboroughreview.com or fax it to 905-689-3110. Please include complete contact information, including your name, telephone number and address.

The candidates: in their own words

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Review asked the four candidates in the federal Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding what measures their government would take to enforce and protect international trade laws. Here's what they had to say.

* * *

David Januczkowski, Green Party of Canada

The Green Party believes in fair trade that maintains our sovereignty, not free trade that often puts foreign business interests first, and leads to rapid environmental degradation and human rights abuses in developing countries.

We would renegotiate our multilateral trade agreements to include fair trade tariffs that protect human rights and global ecosystems and terminate the investor-state dispute mechanism in NAFTA that allows foreign investors compensation for lost profits from our government if we pass laws to protect our environment.

We would propose reforming the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank so that these institutions would be placed under the authority of the UN General Assembly.

The Green Party would shift the focus away from free trade and multi-national corporatism to fair trade and the ability to govern ourselves. We would take steps to make Canada more self-sufficient in order to protect future generations of Canadians.

* * *

Dr. Gordon Guyatt, NDP

Canada surrendered excessive sovereignty in the North American Free Trade Agreement. Chapter 11, which allows foreign companies to sue our government for actions that damage their interests, is a particular problem.

The United States negotiates trade deals with tough regulations. They then enforce these regulations on trading partners, while violating the regulations themselves. American actions on softwood lumber are one example of this behaviour.

Canada must negotiate modifications of NAFTA, particularly Chapter 11. We must clarify that our social programs are out of bounds for American application of NAFTA rules.

Trade wars damage the interests of all participating countries. Nevertheless, we cannot allow the United States to violate trade rules with impunity. The U.S. wants Canadian energy resources badly. While a measure of last resort, if the U.S. refuses to adhere to established rules, Canada should limit or apply conditions to exports of Canadian fossil fuels.

* * *

MP Russ Powers, Liberal

With one in four Canadian jobs relying on international trade, it is imperative that a rules-based system be followed. A Liberal government will fight to have Canadian trade agreements protected, investments secured and the rule of law respected. We will succeed through increased advocacy, litigation and, in appropriate circumstances, retaliation.

This fall, our Liberal government announced the Can-Trade strategy that will add $12 million dollars to advocacy efforts, thereby strengthening our ability to monitor and enforce existing agreements such as the NAFTA and WTO.

We will continue to engage emerging markets like China and India with investment protection agreements to secure Canadian investments abroad.

Canada has continued to win both NAFTA and WTO panel decisions in the softwood lumber dispute; this proves that when the Liberals have stood up for Canada, we have won.

* * *

David Sweet, Conservative

In an increasingly competitive global economy, trade remains the key to future prosperity in Canada.

A Conservative government will act where the Liberals have failed: in defending foresters, farmers, and other primary producers against unfounded trade challenges while also working to open up new markets in the Americas and the Asia-Pacific region.

The Liberals have had 12 years to act and have squandered that time - only raising the ire of our trading partners when it serves their own political gain. That's not how you defend our national interests.

Our campaign is about Standing up for Canada at home and abroad. Canada needs a government that will stand up for our values of freedom, fairness, and compassion. That means a democratic government at home that respects all of our provinces, and defending our national interests and values abroad through a stronger military and a tougher stand on international trade disputes.

* * *

Review readers are invited to suggest questions for the "In Their Own Words" feature, which will run weekly until the federal election on January 23.

To have your question considered, please forward it to editor@flamboroughreview.com or fax it to 905-689-3110. Please include complete contact information, including your name, telephone number and address.

The candidates: in their own words

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The Review asked the four candidates in the federal Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale riding what measures their government would take to enforce and protect international trade laws. Here's what they had to say.

* * *

David Januczkowski, Green Party of Canada

The Green Party believes in fair trade that maintains our sovereignty, not free trade that often puts foreign business interests first, and leads to rapid environmental degradation and human rights abuses in developing countries.

We would renegotiate our multilateral trade agreements to include fair trade tariffs that protect human rights and global ecosystems and terminate the investor-state dispute mechanism in NAFTA that allows foreign investors compensation for lost profits from our government if we pass laws to protect our environment.

We would propose reforming the WTO, the IMF and the World Bank so that these institutions would be placed under the authority of the UN General Assembly.

The Green Party would shift the focus away from free trade and multi-national corporatism to fair trade and the ability to govern ourselves. We would take steps to make Canada more self-sufficient in order to protect future generations of Canadians.

* * *

Dr. Gordon Guyatt, NDP

Canada surrendered excessive sovereignty in the North American Free Trade Agreement. Chapter 11, which allows foreign companies to sue our government for actions that damage their interests, is a particular problem.

The United States negotiates trade deals with tough regulations. They then enforce these regulations on trading partners, while violating the regulations themselves. American actions on softwood lumber are one example of this behaviour.

Canada must negotiate modifications of NAFTA, particularly Chapter 11. We must clarify that our social programs are out of bounds for American application of NAFTA rules.

Trade wars damage the interests of all participating countries. Nevertheless, we cannot allow the United States to violate trade rules with impunity. The U.S. wants Canadian energy resources badly. While a measure of last resort, if the U.S. refuses to adhere to established rules, Canada should limit or apply conditions to exports of Canadian fossil fuels.

* * *

MP Russ Powers, Liberal

With one in four Canadian jobs relying on international trade, it is imperative that a rules-based system be followed. A Liberal government will fight to have Canadian trade agreements protected, investments secured and the rule of law respected. We will succeed through increased advocacy, litigation and, in appropriate circumstances, retaliation.

This fall, our Liberal government announced the Can-Trade strategy that will add $12 million dollars to advocacy efforts, thereby strengthening our ability to monitor and enforce existing agreements such as the NAFTA and WTO.

We will continue to engage emerging markets like China and India with investment protection agreements to secure Canadian investments abroad.

Canada has continued to win both NAFTA and WTO panel decisions in the softwood lumber dispute; this proves that when the Liberals have stood up for Canada, we have won.

* * *

David Sweet, Conservative

In an increasingly competitive global economy, trade remains the key to future prosperity in Canada.

A Conservative government will act where the Liberals have failed: in defending foresters, farmers, and other primary producers against unfounded trade challenges while also working to open up new markets in the Americas and the Asia-Pacific region.

The Liberals have had 12 years to act and have squandered that time - only raising the ire of our trading partners when it serves their own political gain. That's not how you defend our national interests.

Our campaign is about Standing up for Canada at home and abroad. Canada needs a government that will stand up for our values of freedom, fairness, and compassion. That means a democratic government at home that respects all of our provinces, and defending our national interests and values abroad through a stronger military and a tougher stand on international trade disputes.

* * *

Review readers are invited to suggest questions for the "In Their Own Words" feature, which will run weekly until the federal election on January 23.

To have your question considered, please forward it to editor@flamboroughreview.com or fax it to 905-689-3110. Please include complete contact information, including your name, telephone number and address.