Avian stars steal the show in Canadian-made horror movie

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Dundas may have hosted Robin Williams for a recent movie shoot, but Flamborough is also attracting some well-known actors - human and otherwise.

Rod Taylor, known for his starring role in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and George Pal's The Time Machine (both circa the 1960s), was in Westover recently for the filming of a horror thriller called Kaw. The storyline of the movie is reminiscent of The Birds, which featured large birds terrorizing and attacking people in a small California coastal town.

Taylor, now 75, has a small role in Kaw, which according to unit publicist Kim Yu "pays homage" to the Hitchcock thriller. Taylor plays the doctor in the town of Evermore, which is under siege by ravens that have gone on a killing spree after eating diseased cattle on a nearby farm.

Eleven ravens from the Czech Republic star in the movie, which also features a number of computerized birds. The ravens, much larger and more threatening than the average crow, are specially trained for film work by Ota Bares, owner of Fauna Film in Prague. Trainer Nikola Vukovic said the birds are trained from a young age to perform a number of tasks required in movies. The ravens in Kaw are trained to fly from person to person while picking up small slices of beef strategically placed on the shoulders and backs of the cast, she explained, creating the illusion of people being attacked by the birds.

The ravens appeared in The Brothers Grimm and will also be seen in the upcoming Young Hannibal: Behind the Mask.

Appearing with the birds and Taylor in the film are Sean Patrick Flannery, Stephen McHattie, Kristin Booth, John Ralston, Megan Park and Ashley Newbrough. Park, a 19-year-old actress from London, Ontario, was in Flamborough for the filming of Some Things That Stay, which was shot at various locales in west Flamborough about two years ago.

Park plays the part of a Mennonite girl whose father, Oskar (Ralston), is responsible for getting the ravens infected from his diseased cattle. She noted that she loves working on location rather than filming in the studio. "It feels more real," she explained.

Park appears with a group of other teenaged girls, including Doris (Newbrough), who are attacked by the ravens while travelling by school bus to a soccer game. The bus driver, Clyde (McHattie), saves the children but is also attacked by the birds before he gets everyone to a local diner. But even the diner cannot guarantee safety, as the birds go berserk and pummel the building with stones while flying at the windows.

The Westover General Store Caf was converted into Betty's Cookhouse, where many of the scenes were shot. Filming was also done at a farmhouse on the 4th Concession West and at Christie Conservation Area.

Flannery plays the lead role of the town's sheriff, who must work just one more day in Evermore before moving away to a better life with his wife, Cynthia (Booth). It's left up to him to figure out what caused the birds to go amok and how to save the townsfolk from the killer birds.

The two-hour horror flic is being made by Scary Films, an affiliate of Premier Bobine, a Montreal-based film company. It will be shown next year on The Movie Network in Canada, as well as the Sci-Fi channel in the United States and the Space Channel on Cable Television.

Avian stars steal the show in Canadian-made horror movie

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Dundas may have hosted Robin Williams for a recent movie shoot, but Flamborough is also attracting some well-known actors - human and otherwise.

Rod Taylor, known for his starring role in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and George Pal's The Time Machine (both circa the 1960s), was in Westover recently for the filming of a horror thriller called Kaw. The storyline of the movie is reminiscent of The Birds, which featured large birds terrorizing and attacking people in a small California coastal town.

Taylor, now 75, has a small role in Kaw, which according to unit publicist Kim Yu "pays homage" to the Hitchcock thriller. Taylor plays the doctor in the town of Evermore, which is under siege by ravens that have gone on a killing spree after eating diseased cattle on a nearby farm.

Eleven ravens from the Czech Republic star in the movie, which also features a number of computerized birds. The ravens, much larger and more threatening than the average crow, are specially trained for film work by Ota Bares, owner of Fauna Film in Prague. Trainer Nikola Vukovic said the birds are trained from a young age to perform a number of tasks required in movies. The ravens in Kaw are trained to fly from person to person while picking up small slices of beef strategically placed on the shoulders and backs of the cast, she explained, creating the illusion of people being attacked by the birds.

The ravens appeared in The Brothers Grimm and will also be seen in the upcoming Young Hannibal: Behind the Mask.

Appearing with the birds and Taylor in the film are Sean Patrick Flannery, Stephen McHattie, Kristin Booth, John Ralston, Megan Park and Ashley Newbrough. Park, a 19-year-old actress from London, Ontario, was in Flamborough for the filming of Some Things That Stay, which was shot at various locales in west Flamborough about two years ago.

Park plays the part of a Mennonite girl whose father, Oskar (Ralston), is responsible for getting the ravens infected from his diseased cattle. She noted that she loves working on location rather than filming in the studio. "It feels more real," she explained.

Park appears with a group of other teenaged girls, including Doris (Newbrough), who are attacked by the ravens while travelling by school bus to a soccer game. The bus driver, Clyde (McHattie), saves the children but is also attacked by the birds before he gets everyone to a local diner. But even the diner cannot guarantee safety, as the birds go berserk and pummel the building with stones while flying at the windows.

The Westover General Store Caf was converted into Betty's Cookhouse, where many of the scenes were shot. Filming was also done at a farmhouse on the 4th Concession West and at Christie Conservation Area.

Flannery plays the lead role of the town's sheriff, who must work just one more day in Evermore before moving away to a better life with his wife, Cynthia (Booth). It's left up to him to figure out what caused the birds to go amok and how to save the townsfolk from the killer birds.

The two-hour horror flic is being made by Scary Films, an affiliate of Premier Bobine, a Montreal-based film company. It will be shown next year on The Movie Network in Canada, as well as the Sci-Fi channel in the United States and the Space Channel on Cable Television.

Avian stars steal the show in Canadian-made horror movie

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Dundas may have hosted Robin Williams for a recent movie shoot, but Flamborough is also attracting some well-known actors - human and otherwise.

Rod Taylor, known for his starring role in Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and George Pal's The Time Machine (both circa the 1960s), was in Westover recently for the filming of a horror thriller called Kaw. The storyline of the movie is reminiscent of The Birds, which featured large birds terrorizing and attacking people in a small California coastal town.

Taylor, now 75, has a small role in Kaw, which according to unit publicist Kim Yu "pays homage" to the Hitchcock thriller. Taylor plays the doctor in the town of Evermore, which is under siege by ravens that have gone on a killing spree after eating diseased cattle on a nearby farm.

Eleven ravens from the Czech Republic star in the movie, which also features a number of computerized birds. The ravens, much larger and more threatening than the average crow, are specially trained for film work by Ota Bares, owner of Fauna Film in Prague. Trainer Nikola Vukovic said the birds are trained from a young age to perform a number of tasks required in movies. The ravens in Kaw are trained to fly from person to person while picking up small slices of beef strategically placed on the shoulders and backs of the cast, she explained, creating the illusion of people being attacked by the birds.

The ravens appeared in The Brothers Grimm and will also be seen in the upcoming Young Hannibal: Behind the Mask.

Appearing with the birds and Taylor in the film are Sean Patrick Flannery, Stephen McHattie, Kristin Booth, John Ralston, Megan Park and Ashley Newbrough. Park, a 19-year-old actress from London, Ontario, was in Flamborough for the filming of Some Things That Stay, which was shot at various locales in west Flamborough about two years ago.

Park plays the part of a Mennonite girl whose father, Oskar (Ralston), is responsible for getting the ravens infected from his diseased cattle. She noted that she loves working on location rather than filming in the studio. "It feels more real," she explained.

Park appears with a group of other teenaged girls, including Doris (Newbrough), who are attacked by the ravens while travelling by school bus to a soccer game. The bus driver, Clyde (McHattie), saves the children but is also attacked by the birds before he gets everyone to a local diner. But even the diner cannot guarantee safety, as the birds go berserk and pummel the building with stones while flying at the windows.

The Westover General Store Caf was converted into Betty's Cookhouse, where many of the scenes were shot. Filming was also done at a farmhouse on the 4th Concession West and at Christie Conservation Area.

Flannery plays the lead role of the town's sheriff, who must work just one more day in Evermore before moving away to a better life with his wife, Cynthia (Booth). It's left up to him to figure out what caused the birds to go amok and how to save the townsfolk from the killer birds.

The two-hour horror flic is being made by Scary Films, an affiliate of Premier Bobine, a Montreal-based film company. It will be shown next year on The Movie Network in Canada, as well as the Sci-Fi channel in the United States and the Space Channel on Cable Television.