Downtown councillors object to incinerator project in the city

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The social and public services committee drew a line in the sand and opposed any attempt by the city to build an incinerator in Hamilton.

"We have decided not to become the dumping group for other municipalities' waste," said Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla.

In addition to Merulla, Hamilton mountain councillor Tom Jackson, Hamilton councillor Chad Collins and committee chair Brian McHattie all enthusiastically supported the recommendation. Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina was more circumspect in the decision, and did not officially oppose the motion.

The potentially controversial recommendation was expected to be debated at the December 14 council meeting. It is unclear whether the motion will be approved by full council.

The idea to allow the construction of an incinerator in the city became an emotional issue during the summer when, over the strenuous objections of Merulla, councillors approved a rezoning application from a U.S. company, Liberty Energy, to establish a $60-million gasification plant on Strathearne Avenue that would also produce energy from the waste it burns.

Merulla and Collins also led the fight to shut down the Solid Waste Reduction Unit (SWARU) in 2003 after it became the highest source of dioxins in the country.

The fear among some politicians that the Niagara WastePlan group, a joint committee composed of political representatives from the Niagara Region and Hamilton, will recommend constructing its thermal waste disposal facility in Hamilton prompted Merulla to introduce his motion.

Last week, the Niagara WastePlan group recommended the thermal process over landfilling as the preferred option to reach both communities' goal of 65 per cent waste diversion rate by 2008.

"Niagara has less intensification," said Merulla. "The city of Hamilton denies any attempt to build a gasification or incinerator in Hamilton."

Merulla also noted Hamilton already has problems with air quality, especially with particulate material, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide. On Oct. 26, 2004, the city registered the highest reading of pollution in the city's history. Merulla suggested Niagara politicians "do the responsible thing" and select a location for an incinerator in their own municipality.

A preferred location for a thermal facility, which is expected to cost about $100 million, won't be revealed until 2007.

Downtown councillors object to incinerator project in the city

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The social and public services committee drew a line in the sand and opposed any attempt by the city to build an incinerator in Hamilton.

"We have decided not to become the dumping group for other municipalities' waste," said Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla.

In addition to Merulla, Hamilton mountain councillor Tom Jackson, Hamilton councillor Chad Collins and committee chair Brian McHattie all enthusiastically supported the recommendation. Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina was more circumspect in the decision, and did not officially oppose the motion.

The potentially controversial recommendation was expected to be debated at the December 14 council meeting. It is unclear whether the motion will be approved by full council.

The idea to allow the construction of an incinerator in the city became an emotional issue during the summer when, over the strenuous objections of Merulla, councillors approved a rezoning application from a U.S. company, Liberty Energy, to establish a $60-million gasification plant on Strathearne Avenue that would also produce energy from the waste it burns.

Merulla and Collins also led the fight to shut down the Solid Waste Reduction Unit (SWARU) in 2003 after it became the highest source of dioxins in the country.

The fear among some politicians that the Niagara WastePlan group, a joint committee composed of political representatives from the Niagara Region and Hamilton, will recommend constructing its thermal waste disposal facility in Hamilton prompted Merulla to introduce his motion.

Last week, the Niagara WastePlan group recommended the thermal process over landfilling as the preferred option to reach both communities' goal of 65 per cent waste diversion rate by 2008.

"Niagara has less intensification," said Merulla. "The city of Hamilton denies any attempt to build a gasification or incinerator in Hamilton."

Merulla also noted Hamilton already has problems with air quality, especially with particulate material, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide. On Oct. 26, 2004, the city registered the highest reading of pollution in the city's history. Merulla suggested Niagara politicians "do the responsible thing" and select a location for an incinerator in their own municipality.

A preferred location for a thermal facility, which is expected to cost about $100 million, won't be revealed until 2007.

Downtown councillors object to incinerator project in the city

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

The social and public services committee drew a line in the sand and opposed any attempt by the city to build an incinerator in Hamilton.

"We have decided not to become the dumping group for other municipalities' waste," said Hamilton councillor Sam Merulla.

In addition to Merulla, Hamilton mountain councillor Tom Jackson, Hamilton councillor Chad Collins and committee chair Brian McHattie all enthusiastically supported the recommendation. Hamilton councillor Bob Bratina was more circumspect in the decision, and did not officially oppose the motion.

The potentially controversial recommendation was expected to be debated at the December 14 council meeting. It is unclear whether the motion will be approved by full council.

The idea to allow the construction of an incinerator in the city became an emotional issue during the summer when, over the strenuous objections of Merulla, councillors approved a rezoning application from a U.S. company, Liberty Energy, to establish a $60-million gasification plant on Strathearne Avenue that would also produce energy from the waste it burns.

Merulla and Collins also led the fight to shut down the Solid Waste Reduction Unit (SWARU) in 2003 after it became the highest source of dioxins in the country.

The fear among some politicians that the Niagara WastePlan group, a joint committee composed of political representatives from the Niagara Region and Hamilton, will recommend constructing its thermal waste disposal facility in Hamilton prompted Merulla to introduce his motion.

Last week, the Niagara WastePlan group recommended the thermal process over landfilling as the preferred option to reach both communities' goal of 65 per cent waste diversion rate by 2008.

"Niagara has less intensification," said Merulla. "The city of Hamilton denies any attempt to build a gasification or incinerator in Hamilton."

Merulla also noted Hamilton already has problems with air quality, especially with particulate material, carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide. On Oct. 26, 2004, the city registered the highest reading of pollution in the city's history. Merulla suggested Niagara politicians "do the responsible thing" and select a location for an incinerator in their own municipality.

A preferred location for a thermal facility, which is expected to cost about $100 million, won't be revealed until 2007.