Au naturel in the city next spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Hamilton is going au naturel when it comes to using pesticides.

Politicians are expected to approve this week a $60,000 education campaign urging residents to reduce or even eliminate their use of cosmetic pesticides.

Members of the public and social services committee approved the education campaign last week and council was scheduled to meet December 14.

The program, created by Green Venture, centres around a media blitz, that includes a "Naturally Hamilton" logo that incorporates a dragonfly, the creation of a website providing information about pesticides, offering lawn signs to people who have decided not to use pesticides, producing articles on how to garden, placing advertisements in print media and holding workshops to educate people about working without pesticides.

"This is excellent," said Hamilton councillor Tom Jackson. "It has a catchy logo, there is an education program and it asks people to reduce or eliminate pesticide use for cosmetic reasons. It's an important message. I'm proud to support the logo."

The funding will be submitted to the city's 2006 budget committee for approval, but Hamilton councillor Brian McHattie, who is also chair of the pesticide sub-committee, expects the funding to be accepted by councillors.

Exempt from the city's Pesticide Reduction Strategy is property zoned agricultural.

The pesticide sub-committee has been investigating the issue of reducing the city's use of pesticides for over a year. It completed a series of public meetings earlier this year, with many of the participants of the meetings advocating the municipality conduct some sort of education campaign to teach residents the proper use of pesticides.

Lura Consultants, which was hired by the city at a cost of about $70,000 to conduct the public meetings, found "little support for a bylaw to restrict the use of pesticides."

There was also a "divergence" of opinions among residents about the possibility of the city passing a bylaw banning pesticide use.

The consultants, instead, provided a number of hybrid options for councillors to consider, including a bylaw to ban pesticides, but incorporating exemptions; a phase-in period of a year; and introducing permits and licenses for people to use pesticides.

McHattie has said he would like the city to ban the use of cosmetic pesticides.

City officials and lawn care representatives have reminded politicians since both federal and provincial governments have identified pesticides as a legal product, an outright ban on pesticides would be difficult to enforce.

Prior to amalgamation, Dundas was the only municipality to ban the use of pesticides on public land.

Au naturel in the city next spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Hamilton is going au naturel when it comes to using pesticides.

Politicians are expected to approve this week a $60,000 education campaign urging residents to reduce or even eliminate their use of cosmetic pesticides.

Members of the public and social services committee approved the education campaign last week and council was scheduled to meet December 14.

The program, created by Green Venture, centres around a media blitz, that includes a "Naturally Hamilton" logo that incorporates a dragonfly, the creation of a website providing information about pesticides, offering lawn signs to people who have decided not to use pesticides, producing articles on how to garden, placing advertisements in print media and holding workshops to educate people about working without pesticides.

"This is excellent," said Hamilton councillor Tom Jackson. "It has a catchy logo, there is an education program and it asks people to reduce or eliminate pesticide use for cosmetic reasons. It's an important message. I'm proud to support the logo."

The funding will be submitted to the city's 2006 budget committee for approval, but Hamilton councillor Brian McHattie, who is also chair of the pesticide sub-committee, expects the funding to be accepted by councillors.

Exempt from the city's Pesticide Reduction Strategy is property zoned agricultural.

The pesticide sub-committee has been investigating the issue of reducing the city's use of pesticides for over a year. It completed a series of public meetings earlier this year, with many of the participants of the meetings advocating the municipality conduct some sort of education campaign to teach residents the proper use of pesticides.

Lura Consultants, which was hired by the city at a cost of about $70,000 to conduct the public meetings, found "little support for a bylaw to restrict the use of pesticides."

There was also a "divergence" of opinions among residents about the possibility of the city passing a bylaw banning pesticide use.

The consultants, instead, provided a number of hybrid options for councillors to consider, including a bylaw to ban pesticides, but incorporating exemptions; a phase-in period of a year; and introducing permits and licenses for people to use pesticides.

McHattie has said he would like the city to ban the use of cosmetic pesticides.

City officials and lawn care representatives have reminded politicians since both federal and provincial governments have identified pesticides as a legal product, an outright ban on pesticides would be difficult to enforce.

Prior to amalgamation, Dundas was the only municipality to ban the use of pesticides on public land.

Au naturel in the city next spring

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Hamilton is going au naturel when it comes to using pesticides.

Politicians are expected to approve this week a $60,000 education campaign urging residents to reduce or even eliminate their use of cosmetic pesticides.

Members of the public and social services committee approved the education campaign last week and council was scheduled to meet December 14.

The program, created by Green Venture, centres around a media blitz, that includes a "Naturally Hamilton" logo that incorporates a dragonfly, the creation of a website providing information about pesticides, offering lawn signs to people who have decided not to use pesticides, producing articles on how to garden, placing advertisements in print media and holding workshops to educate people about working without pesticides.

"This is excellent," said Hamilton councillor Tom Jackson. "It has a catchy logo, there is an education program and it asks people to reduce or eliminate pesticide use for cosmetic reasons. It's an important message. I'm proud to support the logo."

The funding will be submitted to the city's 2006 budget committee for approval, but Hamilton councillor Brian McHattie, who is also chair of the pesticide sub-committee, expects the funding to be accepted by councillors.

Exempt from the city's Pesticide Reduction Strategy is property zoned agricultural.

The pesticide sub-committee has been investigating the issue of reducing the city's use of pesticides for over a year. It completed a series of public meetings earlier this year, with many of the participants of the meetings advocating the municipality conduct some sort of education campaign to teach residents the proper use of pesticides.

Lura Consultants, which was hired by the city at a cost of about $70,000 to conduct the public meetings, found "little support for a bylaw to restrict the use of pesticides."

There was also a "divergence" of opinions among residents about the possibility of the city passing a bylaw banning pesticide use.

The consultants, instead, provided a number of hybrid options for councillors to consider, including a bylaw to ban pesticides, but incorporating exemptions; a phase-in period of a year; and introducing permits and licenses for people to use pesticides.

McHattie has said he would like the city to ban the use of cosmetic pesticides.

City officials and lawn care representatives have reminded politicians since both federal and provincial governments have identified pesticides as a legal product, an outright ban on pesticides would be difficult to enforce.

Prior to amalgamation, Dundas was the only municipality to ban the use of pesticides on public land.