Mr. Harper, you're no Trudeau

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Conservative MP Diane Ablonczy's comparison of Stephen Harper to Pierre Trudeau, made last week while she was campaigning with local candidate David Sweet, was one of the more ridiculous things I have heard so far in the early days of this election campaign. How desperate are the Conservatives that, to try propping up their flailing leader, they would compare him to "a charismatic Liberal icon?" I guess the Conservatives are hoping that people won't think too hard about it, and that casually throwing out Trudeau's name can only help.

Well, not so fast. Let's compare, shall we? One of Mr. Harper's first campaign pledges was to reopen the debate on same-sex marriage. One of Mr. Trudeau's first pledges, as the then-Minister of Justice, was the famous "the state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation." Never mind that Harper could never sum up an issue so eloquently as Trudeau, he has selected an issue that flies in the face of everything Trudeau stood for. Not the least of which is the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The fact is that the vast majority of Canadians are not concerned about same-sex marriage, but rather, what are you doing about health care, the environment, or the future of our children?

We must move on, and deal with many pressing issues that affect all of us. Nothing can be achieved by toying with the equality of all Canadians. It is the Conservatives' inability to move beyond such issues, and show themselves as being "Progressive" that has hampered their chances of a sweeping victory in Ontario.

Trudeau believed in Canada as the "just society." Harper, apparently, believes in Canada as "just for me."

Trudeau had a clear, broad and inclusive vision for Canada. Harper's vision seems too narrow, bleak and "introverted," to use Ms. Ablonczy's own word to best describe his personality.

There is no comparison between the two men.

Ian Dunlop

Mountsberg

Mr. Harper, you're no Trudeau

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Conservative MP Diane Ablonczy's comparison of Stephen Harper to Pierre Trudeau, made last week while she was campaigning with local candidate David Sweet, was one of the more ridiculous things I have heard so far in the early days of this election campaign. How desperate are the Conservatives that, to try propping up their flailing leader, they would compare him to "a charismatic Liberal icon?" I guess the Conservatives are hoping that people won't think too hard about it, and that casually throwing out Trudeau's name can only help.

Well, not so fast. Let's compare, shall we? One of Mr. Harper's first campaign pledges was to reopen the debate on same-sex marriage. One of Mr. Trudeau's first pledges, as the then-Minister of Justice, was the famous "the state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation." Never mind that Harper could never sum up an issue so eloquently as Trudeau, he has selected an issue that flies in the face of everything Trudeau stood for. Not the least of which is the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The fact is that the vast majority of Canadians are not concerned about same-sex marriage, but rather, what are you doing about health care, the environment, or the future of our children?

We must move on, and deal with many pressing issues that affect all of us. Nothing can be achieved by toying with the equality of all Canadians. It is the Conservatives' inability to move beyond such issues, and show themselves as being "Progressive" that has hampered their chances of a sweeping victory in Ontario.

Trudeau believed in Canada as the "just society." Harper, apparently, believes in Canada as "just for me."

Trudeau had a clear, broad and inclusive vision for Canada. Harper's vision seems too narrow, bleak and "introverted," to use Ms. Ablonczy's own word to best describe his personality.

There is no comparison between the two men.

Ian Dunlop

Mountsberg

Mr. Harper, you're no Trudeau

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Conservative MP Diane Ablonczy's comparison of Stephen Harper to Pierre Trudeau, made last week while she was campaigning with local candidate David Sweet, was one of the more ridiculous things I have heard so far in the early days of this election campaign. How desperate are the Conservatives that, to try propping up their flailing leader, they would compare him to "a charismatic Liberal icon?" I guess the Conservatives are hoping that people won't think too hard about it, and that casually throwing out Trudeau's name can only help.

Well, not so fast. Let's compare, shall we? One of Mr. Harper's first campaign pledges was to reopen the debate on same-sex marriage. One of Mr. Trudeau's first pledges, as the then-Minister of Justice, was the famous "the state has no business in the bedrooms of the nation." Never mind that Harper could never sum up an issue so eloquently as Trudeau, he has selected an issue that flies in the face of everything Trudeau stood for. Not the least of which is the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

The fact is that the vast majority of Canadians are not concerned about same-sex marriage, but rather, what are you doing about health care, the environment, or the future of our children?

We must move on, and deal with many pressing issues that affect all of us. Nothing can be achieved by toying with the equality of all Canadians. It is the Conservatives' inability to move beyond such issues, and show themselves as being "Progressive" that has hampered their chances of a sweeping victory in Ontario.

Trudeau believed in Canada as the "just society." Harper, apparently, believes in Canada as "just for me."

Trudeau had a clear, broad and inclusive vision for Canada. Harper's vision seems too narrow, bleak and "introverted," to use Ms. Ablonczy's own word to best describe his personality.

There is no comparison between the two men.

Ian Dunlop

Mountsberg