Season's Gr-eatings!

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

'Tis the season to be jolly...

'Tis also the season to be over eating. Why is it that every year we pack on the pounds over the holidays and have a hard time losing it in the New Year (despite good intentions)? This time of year is when most adults gain their annual weight.

We all love Santa Claus but we don't want to end up looking like him. I am all for being jolly but I don't want a belly that jiggles like a bowl full of jelly.

The best way to avoid the holiday bulge is to not gain it in the first place. First, we have to set realistic goals. Weight maintenance is more achievable than weight loss over the holidays; it may not be the best time to start a diet.

Devise a plan before your holiday parties start. Eat a nutritious snack before heading out to the buffet. Enjoy the foods you love, eat them slowly and stay away from the ones you could do without. Don't stand too close to the table of food; you aren't obligated to eat even though the food is available.

If you are the party host, prepare foods with low fat and low calorie substitutes. The Canadian and American Diabetes Associations' websites suggests some food substitutions and ideas that can help you to keep your recipes healthier over the holidays and all year.

TRIGGERS

Knowing that for many people, the holidays are a source of stress, it is important to understand your triggers for overeating. If stress is one of those triggers, plan to have nutritious snacks available. This way you won't be reaching for those tempting holiday goodies. To reduce stress, maintain your exercise routine. Time is always limited over the holidays but it is one of the times of year exercise is extra important. Head to the gym regularly or enjoy some winter outdoor activities like cross country skiing, tobogganing, snowshoeing or walking around the neighbourhood at night to look at the Christmas lights. There are plenty of creative and fun ways to stay active over the holidays.

Maintaining your activity levels will help reduce stress and burn some of those extra unwanted (yet so delicious) calories. The most important thing over the holidays is to enjoy yourself. Plan some fun activities, and don't get down on yourself for a little overeating. There are always those New Years resolutions to look forward to.

For more information, visit www.diabetes.ca, www.diabetes.com, or www. mcmaster.ca/health

Dale Rowe is manager of Adult Services at the Flamborough Family YMCA. She can be reached at 905-690-3555 ext. 7012 or dale_rowe@ymcas.ca

Season's Gr-eatings!

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

'Tis the season to be jolly...

'Tis also the season to be over eating. Why is it that every year we pack on the pounds over the holidays and have a hard time losing it in the New Year (despite good intentions)? This time of year is when most adults gain their annual weight.

We all love Santa Claus but we don't want to end up looking like him. I am all for being jolly but I don't want a belly that jiggles like a bowl full of jelly.

The best way to avoid the holiday bulge is to not gain it in the first place. First, we have to set realistic goals. Weight maintenance is more achievable than weight loss over the holidays; it may not be the best time to start a diet.

Devise a plan before your holiday parties start. Eat a nutritious snack before heading out to the buffet. Enjoy the foods you love, eat them slowly and stay away from the ones you could do without. Don't stand too close to the table of food; you aren't obligated to eat even though the food is available.

If you are the party host, prepare foods with low fat and low calorie substitutes. The Canadian and American Diabetes Associations' websites suggests some food substitutions and ideas that can help you to keep your recipes healthier over the holidays and all year.

TRIGGERS

Knowing that for many people, the holidays are a source of stress, it is important to understand your triggers for overeating. If stress is one of those triggers, plan to have nutritious snacks available. This way you won't be reaching for those tempting holiday goodies. To reduce stress, maintain your exercise routine. Time is always limited over the holidays but it is one of the times of year exercise is extra important. Head to the gym regularly or enjoy some winter outdoor activities like cross country skiing, tobogganing, snowshoeing or walking around the neighbourhood at night to look at the Christmas lights. There are plenty of creative and fun ways to stay active over the holidays.

Maintaining your activity levels will help reduce stress and burn some of those extra unwanted (yet so delicious) calories. The most important thing over the holidays is to enjoy yourself. Plan some fun activities, and don't get down on yourself for a little overeating. There are always those New Years resolutions to look forward to.

For more information, visit www.diabetes.ca, www.diabetes.com, or www. mcmaster.ca/health

Dale Rowe is manager of Adult Services at the Flamborough Family YMCA. She can be reached at 905-690-3555 ext. 7012 or dale_rowe@ymcas.ca

Season's Gr-eatings!

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

'Tis the season to be jolly...

'Tis also the season to be over eating. Why is it that every year we pack on the pounds over the holidays and have a hard time losing it in the New Year (despite good intentions)? This time of year is when most adults gain their annual weight.

We all love Santa Claus but we don't want to end up looking like him. I am all for being jolly but I don't want a belly that jiggles like a bowl full of jelly.

The best way to avoid the holiday bulge is to not gain it in the first place. First, we have to set realistic goals. Weight maintenance is more achievable than weight loss over the holidays; it may not be the best time to start a diet.

Devise a plan before your holiday parties start. Eat a nutritious snack before heading out to the buffet. Enjoy the foods you love, eat them slowly and stay away from the ones you could do without. Don't stand too close to the table of food; you aren't obligated to eat even though the food is available.

If you are the party host, prepare foods with low fat and low calorie substitutes. The Canadian and American Diabetes Associations' websites suggests some food substitutions and ideas that can help you to keep your recipes healthier over the holidays and all year.

TRIGGERS

Knowing that for many people, the holidays are a source of stress, it is important to understand your triggers for overeating. If stress is one of those triggers, plan to have nutritious snacks available. This way you won't be reaching for those tempting holiday goodies. To reduce stress, maintain your exercise routine. Time is always limited over the holidays but it is one of the times of year exercise is extra important. Head to the gym regularly or enjoy some winter outdoor activities like cross country skiing, tobogganing, snowshoeing or walking around the neighbourhood at night to look at the Christmas lights. There are plenty of creative and fun ways to stay active over the holidays.

Maintaining your activity levels will help reduce stress and burn some of those extra unwanted (yet so delicious) calories. The most important thing over the holidays is to enjoy yourself. Plan some fun activities, and don't get down on yourself for a little overeating. There are always those New Years resolutions to look forward to.

For more information, visit www.diabetes.ca, www.diabetes.com, or www. mcmaster.ca/health

Dale Rowe is manager of Adult Services at the Flamborough Family YMCA. She can be reached at 905-690-3555 ext. 7012 or dale_rowe@ymcas.ca