CHOICES in store for employment

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

CHOICES will be giving developmentally challenged adults more choice in the job market, thanks to a two-year Trillium Grant for $84,900.

The funding will be used to hire training staff to run the classroom portion of a job-training program.

The program has been a long-term goal for the organization, which offers programming and assistance for adults with developmental disabilities, according to Executive Director Hal Bushey. The training program has finally come to fruition, due to both the grant and the group's recent purchase of The Little Craft Store.

The retail gift shop, on the corner of Mill and Dundas Streets in Waterdown, will be used as the practical training ground for students in the program, and Bushey hopes it's where the students will spend the bulk of their time while in the program.

During the classroom portion, clients will learn how to write a resum, how to conduct themselves during an interview and other key skills needed to join the workforce. Then each client will spend several weeks as an employee of The Little craft Store.

The purchase was a good fit for the organization, said Bushey. The shop is already established, with a loyal client base and knowledgeable staff, which CHOICES will keep on to manage the store.

"We don't know that much about retail, but we're learning," he said. "We had the opportunity to step in to a turn-key operation."

Bushey hopes the funding will give those with developmental disabilities a leg up in the employment world. But it will be an inclusive class; individuals who are disadvantaged due to a lack of job skills or experience, will also be welcome to apply. As an added bonus, all profits from the shop will benefit CHOICES. Bushey is hopeful that the program will be self-supporting after the funding runs out in two years.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation is an agency of the Ministry of Culture. It receives $100 million per year from Ontario's charity casino initiative. That money is used to fund community-based initiatives across the province.

CHOICES in store for employment

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

CHOICES will be giving developmentally challenged adults more choice in the job market, thanks to a two-year Trillium Grant for $84,900.

The funding will be used to hire training staff to run the classroom portion of a job-training program.

The program has been a long-term goal for the organization, which offers programming and assistance for adults with developmental disabilities, according to Executive Director Hal Bushey. The training program has finally come to fruition, due to both the grant and the group's recent purchase of The Little Craft Store.

The retail gift shop, on the corner of Mill and Dundas Streets in Waterdown, will be used as the practical training ground for students in the program, and Bushey hopes it's where the students will spend the bulk of their time while in the program.

During the classroom portion, clients will learn how to write a resum, how to conduct themselves during an interview and other key skills needed to join the workforce. Then each client will spend several weeks as an employee of The Little craft Store.

The purchase was a good fit for the organization, said Bushey. The shop is already established, with a loyal client base and knowledgeable staff, which CHOICES will keep on to manage the store.

"We don't know that much about retail, but we're learning," he said. "We had the opportunity to step in to a turn-key operation."

Bushey hopes the funding will give those with developmental disabilities a leg up in the employment world. But it will be an inclusive class; individuals who are disadvantaged due to a lack of job skills or experience, will also be welcome to apply. As an added bonus, all profits from the shop will benefit CHOICES. Bushey is hopeful that the program will be self-supporting after the funding runs out in two years.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation is an agency of the Ministry of Culture. It receives $100 million per year from Ontario's charity casino initiative. That money is used to fund community-based initiatives across the province.

CHOICES in store for employment

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

CHOICES will be giving developmentally challenged adults more choice in the job market, thanks to a two-year Trillium Grant for $84,900.

The funding will be used to hire training staff to run the classroom portion of a job-training program.

The program has been a long-term goal for the organization, which offers programming and assistance for adults with developmental disabilities, according to Executive Director Hal Bushey. The training program has finally come to fruition, due to both the grant and the group's recent purchase of The Little Craft Store.

The retail gift shop, on the corner of Mill and Dundas Streets in Waterdown, will be used as the practical training ground for students in the program, and Bushey hopes it's where the students will spend the bulk of their time while in the program.

During the classroom portion, clients will learn how to write a resum, how to conduct themselves during an interview and other key skills needed to join the workforce. Then each client will spend several weeks as an employee of The Little craft Store.

The purchase was a good fit for the organization, said Bushey. The shop is already established, with a loyal client base and knowledgeable staff, which CHOICES will keep on to manage the store.

"We don't know that much about retail, but we're learning," he said. "We had the opportunity to step in to a turn-key operation."

Bushey hopes the funding will give those with developmental disabilities a leg up in the employment world. But it will be an inclusive class; individuals who are disadvantaged due to a lack of job skills or experience, will also be welcome to apply. As an added bonus, all profits from the shop will benefit CHOICES. Bushey is hopeful that the program will be self-supporting after the funding runs out in two years.

The Ontario Trillium Foundation is an agency of the Ministry of Culture. It receives $100 million per year from Ontario's charity casino initiative. That money is used to fund community-based initiatives across the province.