Deputy CPC leader fields questions while stumping in Millgrove

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Peter MacKay, visiting Flamborough on Tuesday, left no doubts where his loyalties lie. The deputy leader of the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) stood steadfastly by Stephen Harper when pressed by media to comment about his party's leader's nagging public image problems.

Still seen by some Canadians as stiff and inflexible, Harper was portrayed by MacKay as "a young father...an honest, hardworking Canadian" who, in the current federal leadership race, is "presenting positive, forward-looking policies for the good of Canada."

MacKay did take the gloves off when strained Canadian-U.S. relations over the softwood lumber controversy were mentioned. He called for "more diplomatic and positive" relations with the U.S. and accused Paul Martin of "pure and simple election posturing" in what has been construed by some as a patriotic stance in protecting Canada's interests despite negative fallout from the United States.

"I don't mean to agree and kowtow to the Americans," MacKay said, adding that putting strains on "our best and most important trading relationship" isn't the right approach.

MacKay took a whirlwind 20-minute tour of Millgrove's Dutch Mill Country Market with local CPC candidate David Sweet (Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale). During a brief media scrum, he fielded questions about the party's prospects to form the next Canadian government, the slow but steady growth of voter support for the CPC in recent weeks, who the party would align itself with in the event of a minority CPC government and what relief his party would offer to Canadians facing high gasoline and home heating fuel costs.

While saying he "believes strongly" the Conservatives are going to win the Jan. 23 election, MacKay noted the CPC would be willing to work with any party, including the Liberals, if it were in a minority position.

"From time to time, we've worked with all parties," he said, noting that the decision on who the party should align itself with would depend on the issue or policy at hand.

Remarking on the slow growth of party support from voters, as evidenced in recent polls, he said a significant amount of policy has been put forward in recent weeks and it will take time for Canadians to digest it all.

On rising fuel costs, he indicated there is "room for tax relief." The CPC's promise to bring forward a 2 per cent reduction in the GST over the next five years, with a one per cent reduction implemented immediately, will provide some relief, he suggested. He also indicated that the massive amount of revenue the federal government has gleaned from high prices at the gas pumps could be returned, in part, in the form of subsidies for seniors and others on fixed incomes struggling with high fuel costs.

Deputy CPC leader fields questions while stumping in Millgrove

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Peter MacKay, visiting Flamborough on Tuesday, left no doubts where his loyalties lie. The deputy leader of the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) stood steadfastly by Stephen Harper when pressed by media to comment about his party's leader's nagging public image problems.

Still seen by some Canadians as stiff and inflexible, Harper was portrayed by MacKay as "a young father...an honest, hardworking Canadian" who, in the current federal leadership race, is "presenting positive, forward-looking policies for the good of Canada."

MacKay did take the gloves off when strained Canadian-U.S. relations over the softwood lumber controversy were mentioned. He called for "more diplomatic and positive" relations with the U.S. and accused Paul Martin of "pure and simple election posturing" in what has been construed by some as a patriotic stance in protecting Canada's interests despite negative fallout from the United States.

"I don't mean to agree and kowtow to the Americans," MacKay said, adding that putting strains on "our best and most important trading relationship" isn't the right approach.

MacKay took a whirlwind 20-minute tour of Millgrove's Dutch Mill Country Market with local CPC candidate David Sweet (Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale). During a brief media scrum, he fielded questions about the party's prospects to form the next Canadian government, the slow but steady growth of voter support for the CPC in recent weeks, who the party would align itself with in the event of a minority CPC government and what relief his party would offer to Canadians facing high gasoline and home heating fuel costs.

While saying he "believes strongly" the Conservatives are going to win the Jan. 23 election, MacKay noted the CPC would be willing to work with any party, including the Liberals, if it were in a minority position.

"From time to time, we've worked with all parties," he said, noting that the decision on who the party should align itself with would depend on the issue or policy at hand.

Remarking on the slow growth of party support from voters, as evidenced in recent polls, he said a significant amount of policy has been put forward in recent weeks and it will take time for Canadians to digest it all.

On rising fuel costs, he indicated there is "room for tax relief." The CPC's promise to bring forward a 2 per cent reduction in the GST over the next five years, with a one per cent reduction implemented immediately, will provide some relief, he suggested. He also indicated that the massive amount of revenue the federal government has gleaned from high prices at the gas pumps could be returned, in part, in the form of subsidies for seniors and others on fixed incomes struggling with high fuel costs.

Deputy CPC leader fields questions while stumping in Millgrove

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Peter MacKay, visiting Flamborough on Tuesday, left no doubts where his loyalties lie. The deputy leader of the Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) stood steadfastly by Stephen Harper when pressed by media to comment about his party's leader's nagging public image problems.

Still seen by some Canadians as stiff and inflexible, Harper was portrayed by MacKay as "a young father...an honest, hardworking Canadian" who, in the current federal leadership race, is "presenting positive, forward-looking policies for the good of Canada."

MacKay did take the gloves off when strained Canadian-U.S. relations over the softwood lumber controversy were mentioned. He called for "more diplomatic and positive" relations with the U.S. and accused Paul Martin of "pure and simple election posturing" in what has been construed by some as a patriotic stance in protecting Canada's interests despite negative fallout from the United States.

"I don't mean to agree and kowtow to the Americans," MacKay said, adding that putting strains on "our best and most important trading relationship" isn't the right approach.

MacKay took a whirlwind 20-minute tour of Millgrove's Dutch Mill Country Market with local CPC candidate David Sweet (Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough-Westdale). During a brief media scrum, he fielded questions about the party's prospects to form the next Canadian government, the slow but steady growth of voter support for the CPC in recent weeks, who the party would align itself with in the event of a minority CPC government and what relief his party would offer to Canadians facing high gasoline and home heating fuel costs.

While saying he "believes strongly" the Conservatives are going to win the Jan. 23 election, MacKay noted the CPC would be willing to work with any party, including the Liberals, if it were in a minority position.

"From time to time, we've worked with all parties," he said, noting that the decision on who the party should align itself with would depend on the issue or policy at hand.

Remarking on the slow growth of party support from voters, as evidenced in recent polls, he said a significant amount of policy has been put forward in recent weeks and it will take time for Canadians to digest it all.

On rising fuel costs, he indicated there is "room for tax relief." The CPC's promise to bring forward a 2 per cent reduction in the GST over the next five years, with a one per cent reduction implemented immediately, will provide some relief, he suggested. He also indicated that the massive amount of revenue the federal government has gleaned from high prices at the gas pumps could be returned, in part, in the form of subsidies for seniors and others on fixed incomes struggling with high fuel costs.