A leader needs vision, not charisma

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

(Re: Mr. Dunlop's letter concerning Mr. Harper, Review, Dec. 16th):

Does it really matter whether the next Prime Minister of Canada has charisma or not? Last time I checked, we aren't inviting him for supper, but rather asking him to lead the government of Canada. For the Prime Minister of Canada, most Canadians value intelligence and insight far more than skin- deep charisma.

Mr. Dunlop also suggests that Mr. Harper should move on, and "deal with many pressing issues that affect all of us." Not so fast. Let's compare, shall we? Which party leader is stuck in the past and not moving on? Paul Martin and an old, tired Liberal party that rehashes the same old promises every time an election is called? Or Stephen Harper who has come up with new ideas and a fresh approach for governing Canada?

For example, on the issue of health care, the Liberals parrot the same old clichs that private clinics are unacceptable and bad, while Mr. Martin hypocritically uses a private medical clinic himself. Meanwhile, wait times for medical services have doubled over the last 12 years of Liberal government.

Mr. Harper has come up with a new approach to the public/private health care debate. While confirming the need for universally funded public health care, he has acknowledged that private clinics perform a valuable service that can be used intelligently in the delivery of health care and shorten wait times. Rather than a short-sighted view of health care, Stephen Harper has offered thoughtful ideas based on real and workable solutions.

And if Paul Martin honestly believes that he can solve the problem of national unity with Quebec, to which the Liberal Party has done more damage in the last ten years than ever before through corruption and scandal, then he's living in a fantasy that's bigger than his desire to hang onto power. His approach of fear and deceit is typical but not very original for a Liberal or wise of Mr. Martin.

On the other hand, Stephen Harper comes with an approach to national unity that says we need to sit down with the current administration in Quebec City and discuss how we can accommodate a distinct Quebec within the federation of Canada. Mr. Harper comes with a message of hope and cooperation for Quebec, that he is willing to listen to and work with them in building a lasting united Canada.

Stephen Harper's vision for Canada is clear and bright and hopeful. I would suggest that Mr. Harper has moved on, in fact, far beyond Mr. Martin. While Paul Martin desperately clings to power, Mr. Harper and his Conservative team communicate a positive approach to governing Canada. I look forward to a sunny day on January 24th.

Ron Bremer

Carlisle

A leader needs vision, not charisma

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

(Re: Mr. Dunlop's letter concerning Mr. Harper, Review, Dec. 16th):

Does it really matter whether the next Prime Minister of Canada has charisma or not? Last time I checked, we aren't inviting him for supper, but rather asking him to lead the government of Canada. For the Prime Minister of Canada, most Canadians value intelligence and insight far more than skin- deep charisma.

Mr. Dunlop also suggests that Mr. Harper should move on, and "deal with many pressing issues that affect all of us." Not so fast. Let's compare, shall we? Which party leader is stuck in the past and not moving on? Paul Martin and an old, tired Liberal party that rehashes the same old promises every time an election is called? Or Stephen Harper who has come up with new ideas and a fresh approach for governing Canada?

For example, on the issue of health care, the Liberals parrot the same old clichs that private clinics are unacceptable and bad, while Mr. Martin hypocritically uses a private medical clinic himself. Meanwhile, wait times for medical services have doubled over the last 12 years of Liberal government.

Mr. Harper has come up with a new approach to the public/private health care debate. While confirming the need for universally funded public health care, he has acknowledged that private clinics perform a valuable service that can be used intelligently in the delivery of health care and shorten wait times. Rather than a short-sighted view of health care, Stephen Harper has offered thoughtful ideas based on real and workable solutions.

And if Paul Martin honestly believes that he can solve the problem of national unity with Quebec, to which the Liberal Party has done more damage in the last ten years than ever before through corruption and scandal, then he's living in a fantasy that's bigger than his desire to hang onto power. His approach of fear and deceit is typical but not very original for a Liberal or wise of Mr. Martin.

On the other hand, Stephen Harper comes with an approach to national unity that says we need to sit down with the current administration in Quebec City and discuss how we can accommodate a distinct Quebec within the federation of Canada. Mr. Harper comes with a message of hope and cooperation for Quebec, that he is willing to listen to and work with them in building a lasting united Canada.

Stephen Harper's vision for Canada is clear and bright and hopeful. I would suggest that Mr. Harper has moved on, in fact, far beyond Mr. Martin. While Paul Martin desperately clings to power, Mr. Harper and his Conservative team communicate a positive approach to governing Canada. I look forward to a sunny day on January 24th.

Ron Bremer

Carlisle

A leader needs vision, not charisma

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

(Re: Mr. Dunlop's letter concerning Mr. Harper, Review, Dec. 16th):

Does it really matter whether the next Prime Minister of Canada has charisma or not? Last time I checked, we aren't inviting him for supper, but rather asking him to lead the government of Canada. For the Prime Minister of Canada, most Canadians value intelligence and insight far more than skin- deep charisma.

Mr. Dunlop also suggests that Mr. Harper should move on, and "deal with many pressing issues that affect all of us." Not so fast. Let's compare, shall we? Which party leader is stuck in the past and not moving on? Paul Martin and an old, tired Liberal party that rehashes the same old promises every time an election is called? Or Stephen Harper who has come up with new ideas and a fresh approach for governing Canada?

For example, on the issue of health care, the Liberals parrot the same old clichs that private clinics are unacceptable and bad, while Mr. Martin hypocritically uses a private medical clinic himself. Meanwhile, wait times for medical services have doubled over the last 12 years of Liberal government.

Mr. Harper has come up with a new approach to the public/private health care debate. While confirming the need for universally funded public health care, he has acknowledged that private clinics perform a valuable service that can be used intelligently in the delivery of health care and shorten wait times. Rather than a short-sighted view of health care, Stephen Harper has offered thoughtful ideas based on real and workable solutions.

And if Paul Martin honestly believes that he can solve the problem of national unity with Quebec, to which the Liberal Party has done more damage in the last ten years than ever before through corruption and scandal, then he's living in a fantasy that's bigger than his desire to hang onto power. His approach of fear and deceit is typical but not very original for a Liberal or wise of Mr. Martin.

On the other hand, Stephen Harper comes with an approach to national unity that says we need to sit down with the current administration in Quebec City and discuss how we can accommodate a distinct Quebec within the federation of Canada. Mr. Harper comes with a message of hope and cooperation for Quebec, that he is willing to listen to and work with them in building a lasting united Canada.

Stephen Harper's vision for Canada is clear and bright and hopeful. I would suggest that Mr. Harper has moved on, in fact, far beyond Mr. Martin. While Paul Martin desperately clings to power, Mr. Harper and his Conservative team communicate a positive approach to governing Canada. I look forward to a sunny day on January 24th.

Ron Bremer

Carlisle