Flamborough refuses to be defined by city boundaries

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Although it may be part of a big city, Flamborough has always kept its community at heart. Although I haven't been here for all of 2005, I'm struck, just in the time I've been here, how generous the community has been.

Just over this past Christmas season, for example, schools, businesses and organizations have kept us and our camera hopping, with countless toy, food and clothing drives. This speaks volumes about not just the people who volunteer their time to organize them, but the countless numbers who contribute, quietly and regularly..

But Flamborough's generosity extends well past the Christmas season.

Katelyn Edwards was inspired to action after hearing Valentine Sualley speak to SOLID, a group of globally-minded students at Waterdown District High School. The refugee from Sierra Leone has had to watch helplessly as his country was shattered by war.

The high school had already organized a dance to raise funds, so Edwards went back to her roots at Allan A. Greenleaf Elementary School, to organize a new fundraiser. The whole school got involved; each grade learned about Sierra Leone, and twinned with classes there, to learn what life is like for kids their age. Through a loonie drive, they raised more than $1,000 to rebuild the roof of a school in the war-torn nation.

One of my favourite stories during my short time at the Review has been the one about Marcel.

The soft-spoken maintenance worker at the Flamborough YMCA was in a bind. His mother was dying of breast cancer, in his homeland of Congo. He hadn't seen her in seven years - since a missionary organization helped him flee the war-torn nation. But as a hard-working new immigrant, he couldn't afford the ticket home.

So the staff at the YMCA put out the call for help. And Flamborough answered. Within days, citizens had donated the thousands of dollars he needed to fly home to be at his mom's side, including one generous man, who dropped off $1,000.

Although Marcel didn't make it in time to say goodbye to his mother, without help from Flamborough, he would never have made it at all.

Shona Holmes and her family - usually more accustomed to being on the giving side of the equation - also came to know firsthand the generosity of local residents.

When Shona faced hefty medical bills after choosing to undergo brain surgery south of the border, the community rallied behind her. The business community organized fundraisers and a gala evening, to offset some of her costs.

Flamborough residents are known for picking up where the system falls short, and for the sake of little Jake Tuin, I sincerely hope that continues.

The truly adorable 3-year-old is on a three-year waiting list for behavioral therapy, which could allow him to lead a productive life, despite his severe autism. By the time he's in the program offered at Chedoke that is subsidized by the provincial government, it will be too late - he'll be past his prime learning years. And to add insult to injury, the provincial Liberals recently cut funding to these valuable programs, which will lengthen Jake's wait even more.

The Tuins have immediate access to a private behavioural therapy program, but it comes at a hefty price - roughly $30,000 per year. It's an impossible figure for the modest household, which is just holding its own; many families before them have lost everything in an effort to pay the bill. A

Area residents can help Jake get into the training he needs, by taking donations to any TD Branch, and asking that they be placed in trust for Jake. The transit number is 3810, with account number 6284100.

Flamborough is proof that a community is held together by more than just geography, or common complaints over rising taxes or city hall squabbles.

It's people and the care those people show for their neighbours which makes Flamborough a community. I hope residents hold as dear to that in 2006 and beyond as they have in 2005.

Flamborough refuses to be defined by city boundaries

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Although it may be part of a big city, Flamborough has always kept its community at heart. Although I haven't been here for all of 2005, I'm struck, just in the time I've been here, how generous the community has been.

Just over this past Christmas season, for example, schools, businesses and organizations have kept us and our camera hopping, with countless toy, food and clothing drives. This speaks volumes about not just the people who volunteer their time to organize them, but the countless numbers who contribute, quietly and regularly..

But Flamborough's generosity extends well past the Christmas season.

Katelyn Edwards was inspired to action after hearing Valentine Sualley speak to SOLID, a group of globally-minded students at Waterdown District High School. The refugee from Sierra Leone has had to watch helplessly as his country was shattered by war.

The high school had already organized a dance to raise funds, so Edwards went back to her roots at Allan A. Greenleaf Elementary School, to organize a new fundraiser. The whole school got involved; each grade learned about Sierra Leone, and twinned with classes there, to learn what life is like for kids their age. Through a loonie drive, they raised more than $1,000 to rebuild the roof of a school in the war-torn nation.

One of my favourite stories during my short time at the Review has been the one about Marcel.

The soft-spoken maintenance worker at the Flamborough YMCA was in a bind. His mother was dying of breast cancer, in his homeland of Congo. He hadn't seen her in seven years - since a missionary organization helped him flee the war-torn nation. But as a hard-working new immigrant, he couldn't afford the ticket home.

So the staff at the YMCA put out the call for help. And Flamborough answered. Within days, citizens had donated the thousands of dollars he needed to fly home to be at his mom's side, including one generous man, who dropped off $1,000.

Although Marcel didn't make it in time to say goodbye to his mother, without help from Flamborough, he would never have made it at all.

Shona Holmes and her family - usually more accustomed to being on the giving side of the equation - also came to know firsthand the generosity of local residents.

When Shona faced hefty medical bills after choosing to undergo brain surgery south of the border, the community rallied behind her. The business community organized fundraisers and a gala evening, to offset some of her costs.

Flamborough residents are known for picking up where the system falls short, and for the sake of little Jake Tuin, I sincerely hope that continues.

The truly adorable 3-year-old is on a three-year waiting list for behavioral therapy, which could allow him to lead a productive life, despite his severe autism. By the time he's in the program offered at Chedoke that is subsidized by the provincial government, it will be too late - he'll be past his prime learning years. And to add insult to injury, the provincial Liberals recently cut funding to these valuable programs, which will lengthen Jake's wait even more.

The Tuins have immediate access to a private behavioural therapy program, but it comes at a hefty price - roughly $30,000 per year. It's an impossible figure for the modest household, which is just holding its own; many families before them have lost everything in an effort to pay the bill. A

Area residents can help Jake get into the training he needs, by taking donations to any TD Branch, and asking that they be placed in trust for Jake. The transit number is 3810, with account number 6284100.

Flamborough is proof that a community is held together by more than just geography, or common complaints over rising taxes or city hall squabbles.

It's people and the care those people show for their neighbours which makes Flamborough a community. I hope residents hold as dear to that in 2006 and beyond as they have in 2005.

Flamborough refuses to be defined by city boundaries

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Although it may be part of a big city, Flamborough has always kept its community at heart. Although I haven't been here for all of 2005, I'm struck, just in the time I've been here, how generous the community has been.

Just over this past Christmas season, for example, schools, businesses and organizations have kept us and our camera hopping, with countless toy, food and clothing drives. This speaks volumes about not just the people who volunteer their time to organize them, but the countless numbers who contribute, quietly and regularly..

But Flamborough's generosity extends well past the Christmas season.

Katelyn Edwards was inspired to action after hearing Valentine Sualley speak to SOLID, a group of globally-minded students at Waterdown District High School. The refugee from Sierra Leone has had to watch helplessly as his country was shattered by war.

The high school had already organized a dance to raise funds, so Edwards went back to her roots at Allan A. Greenleaf Elementary School, to organize a new fundraiser. The whole school got involved; each grade learned about Sierra Leone, and twinned with classes there, to learn what life is like for kids their age. Through a loonie drive, they raised more than $1,000 to rebuild the roof of a school in the war-torn nation.

One of my favourite stories during my short time at the Review has been the one about Marcel.

The soft-spoken maintenance worker at the Flamborough YMCA was in a bind. His mother was dying of breast cancer, in his homeland of Congo. He hadn't seen her in seven years - since a missionary organization helped him flee the war-torn nation. But as a hard-working new immigrant, he couldn't afford the ticket home.

So the staff at the YMCA put out the call for help. And Flamborough answered. Within days, citizens had donated the thousands of dollars he needed to fly home to be at his mom's side, including one generous man, who dropped off $1,000.

Although Marcel didn't make it in time to say goodbye to his mother, without help from Flamborough, he would never have made it at all.

Shona Holmes and her family - usually more accustomed to being on the giving side of the equation - also came to know firsthand the generosity of local residents.

When Shona faced hefty medical bills after choosing to undergo brain surgery south of the border, the community rallied behind her. The business community organized fundraisers and a gala evening, to offset some of her costs.

Flamborough residents are known for picking up where the system falls short, and for the sake of little Jake Tuin, I sincerely hope that continues.

The truly adorable 3-year-old is on a three-year waiting list for behavioral therapy, which could allow him to lead a productive life, despite his severe autism. By the time he's in the program offered at Chedoke that is subsidized by the provincial government, it will be too late - he'll be past his prime learning years. And to add insult to injury, the provincial Liberals recently cut funding to these valuable programs, which will lengthen Jake's wait even more.

The Tuins have immediate access to a private behavioural therapy program, but it comes at a hefty price - roughly $30,000 per year. It's an impossible figure for the modest household, which is just holding its own; many families before them have lost everything in an effort to pay the bill. A

Area residents can help Jake get into the training he needs, by taking donations to any TD Branch, and asking that they be placed in trust for Jake. The transit number is 3810, with account number 6284100.

Flamborough is proof that a community is held together by more than just geography, or common complaints over rising taxes or city hall squabbles.

It's people and the care those people show for their neighbours which makes Flamborough a community. I hope residents hold as dear to that in 2006 and beyond as they have in 2005.