Running down a dream

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

When Tara Quinn-Smith runs in the 10,000-metre women's race at the Commonwealth Games in Australia next March, she'll be facing some tough competition. But far from being daunted by the prospect, the Waterdown distance runner feels invigorated and "excited by the great opportunity to compete in a world-class field of runners."

"It (the Games) will be my first international track and field event," the 26-year-old said last week. Quinn-Smith will be competing against high-profile runners like Paula Radcliffe of Great Britain, the current holder of the world record in the women's marathon.

Quinn-Smith feels the Melbourne Games will be a good test of her abilities and will indicate where she sits competitively. A good showing will help set the stage for fulfilling her aspirations of representing Canada at the Olympics in Beijing in 2008.

But the challenge will be a tough one: the current Olympic standard for the 10,000-metre race is 31:40; Quinn-Smith's best time is a minute off that, at 32:43.

That means to qualify for Beijing, she will need to cut between 20 and 30 seconds off her best time in the 10,000 each year for the next three years.

"It can be done," she said, noting that last year, she ran 30 to 40 seconds faster than the year before. She's confident she can continue to better her time with hard work and training.

Quinn-Smith, who lives in Etobicoke and trains with the Toronto Olympic Club, began distance running when she was 17. She continued to better her running performance while on a sports scholarship at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Over the past year, she has burned up the track in a number of national events. In May, she was the first Canadian runner to cross the finish line in the 21-k event at the Canadian Half-Marathon in Edmonton. She captured gold a month later in the 10,000-metre run at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Abbotsford, B.C. and, in July, she got a silver in the 5,000-metre run at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Winnipeg.

In early December, she placed second at the Canadian Cross-Country Championships in Vancouver, completing the six-kilometre women's race in 20:25.

A couple of indoor track races, including one at the end of January in Boston, will keep her busy early in 2006.

Quinn-Smith is looking forward to the World Championships in Osaka, Japan, in 2007. She credits her success to her rigorous training schedule, her continued good health and lots of moral support from family, including her parents, Kerry and Nancy Quinn of Waterdown, her twin sister, Tiffany, and her husband, Andrew Smith, who is also a distance runner.

Running down a dream

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

When Tara Quinn-Smith runs in the 10,000-metre women's race at the Commonwealth Games in Australia next March, she'll be facing some tough competition. But far from being daunted by the prospect, the Waterdown distance runner feels invigorated and "excited by the great opportunity to compete in a world-class field of runners."

"It (the Games) will be my first international track and field event," the 26-year-old said last week. Quinn-Smith will be competing against high-profile runners like Paula Radcliffe of Great Britain, the current holder of the world record in the women's marathon.

Quinn-Smith feels the Melbourne Games will be a good test of her abilities and will indicate where she sits competitively. A good showing will help set the stage for fulfilling her aspirations of representing Canada at the Olympics in Beijing in 2008.

But the challenge will be a tough one: the current Olympic standard for the 10,000-metre race is 31:40; Quinn-Smith's best time is a minute off that, at 32:43.

That means to qualify for Beijing, she will need to cut between 20 and 30 seconds off her best time in the 10,000 each year for the next three years.

"It can be done," she said, noting that last year, she ran 30 to 40 seconds faster than the year before. She's confident she can continue to better her time with hard work and training.

Quinn-Smith, who lives in Etobicoke and trains with the Toronto Olympic Club, began distance running when she was 17. She continued to better her running performance while on a sports scholarship at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Over the past year, she has burned up the track in a number of national events. In May, she was the first Canadian runner to cross the finish line in the 21-k event at the Canadian Half-Marathon in Edmonton. She captured gold a month later in the 10,000-metre run at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Abbotsford, B.C. and, in July, she got a silver in the 5,000-metre run at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Winnipeg.

In early December, she placed second at the Canadian Cross-Country Championships in Vancouver, completing the six-kilometre women's race in 20:25.

A couple of indoor track races, including one at the end of January in Boston, will keep her busy early in 2006.

Quinn-Smith is looking forward to the World Championships in Osaka, Japan, in 2007. She credits her success to her rigorous training schedule, her continued good health and lots of moral support from family, including her parents, Kerry and Nancy Quinn of Waterdown, her twin sister, Tiffany, and her husband, Andrew Smith, who is also a distance runner.

Running down a dream

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

When Tara Quinn-Smith runs in the 10,000-metre women's race at the Commonwealth Games in Australia next March, she'll be facing some tough competition. But far from being daunted by the prospect, the Waterdown distance runner feels invigorated and "excited by the great opportunity to compete in a world-class field of runners."

"It (the Games) will be my first international track and field event," the 26-year-old said last week. Quinn-Smith will be competing against high-profile runners like Paula Radcliffe of Great Britain, the current holder of the world record in the women's marathon.

Quinn-Smith feels the Melbourne Games will be a good test of her abilities and will indicate where she sits competitively. A good showing will help set the stage for fulfilling her aspirations of representing Canada at the Olympics in Beijing in 2008.

But the challenge will be a tough one: the current Olympic standard for the 10,000-metre race is 31:40; Quinn-Smith's best time is a minute off that, at 32:43.

That means to qualify for Beijing, she will need to cut between 20 and 30 seconds off her best time in the 10,000 each year for the next three years.

"It can be done," she said, noting that last year, she ran 30 to 40 seconds faster than the year before. She's confident she can continue to better her time with hard work and training.

Quinn-Smith, who lives in Etobicoke and trains with the Toronto Olympic Club, began distance running when she was 17. She continued to better her running performance while on a sports scholarship at the University of South Florida in Tampa.

Over the past year, she has burned up the track in a number of national events. In May, she was the first Canadian runner to cross the finish line in the 21-k event at the Canadian Half-Marathon in Edmonton. She captured gold a month later in the 10,000-metre run at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Abbotsford, B.C. and, in July, she got a silver in the 5,000-metre run at the Canadian Track and Field Championships in Winnipeg.

In early December, she placed second at the Canadian Cross-Country Championships in Vancouver, completing the six-kilometre women's race in 20:25.

A couple of indoor track races, including one at the end of January in Boston, will keep her busy early in 2006.

Quinn-Smith is looking forward to the World Championships in Osaka, Japan, in 2007. She credits her success to her rigorous training schedule, her continued good health and lots of moral support from family, including her parents, Kerry and Nancy Quinn of Waterdown, her twin sister, Tiffany, and her husband, Andrew Smith, who is also a distance runner.