Stormy weather

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Mother Nature certainly put her foot down over the past year, humbling the powerful, devastating whole regions and wreaking havoc with the world economy.

As Christmas festivities wound down in 2004 and Boxing Day shoppers poised to turn the calendar page, the tsunami in south-east Asia struck. Horrified, we watched as the the death toll continued to climb, reaching unimaginable heights as aid workers scrambled to mobilize equipment and crews to aid the victims and tackle cleanup on a grand scale.

One year later, the world is still struggling to put the scope of the disaster into perspective: 220,000 lives lost in 12 countries due to the undersea tremor that measured 9.15 on the Richter scale. Rebuilding in the region is just now in its initial stages, and could take between five and 10 years to complete. Indonesia alone, which reported some 168,000 deaths, is looking at about $4.5 billion in reconstruction costs.

And the world continues to struggle with feeding and caring for those displaced by the tsunami: cleaning the land, restoring drinking water systems and rebuilding schools are only a some of the projects now underway, one year later.

The relative calm in the wake of the tsunami left the world unprepared for the ire of Hurricane Katrina, which tallied more modest numbers in terms of fatalities, but revealed a new level of darkness for humanity.

The category 5 storm literally brought the most powerful nation on earth to its knees, obliterating an outdated levee system and leaving residents - the majority being poor and black - to fend mostly for themselves for water, shelter and food until a slow-moving Federal Emergency Management Agency mobilized to provide relief. While reconstruction is underway to restore New Orleans, the American government may struggle for a long time to rebuild its tattered image.

Mother Nature wasn't done, though, and wielded her power in October with an earthquake in north Pakistan. While early tolls were placed at about 87,000 deaths, the number won't be final until the region survives its harsh winter months - not an easy challenge given that 85 per cent of the structures were destroyed, leaving some 30,000 people homeless.

They say one should never wish away time, but it's time to bid a heartfelt goodbye to a year full of death and destruction. And to pray for a calm year in which to rebuild and heal.

Stormy weather

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Mother Nature certainly put her foot down over the past year, humbling the powerful, devastating whole regions and wreaking havoc with the world economy.

As Christmas festivities wound down in 2004 and Boxing Day shoppers poised to turn the calendar page, the tsunami in south-east Asia struck. Horrified, we watched as the the death toll continued to climb, reaching unimaginable heights as aid workers scrambled to mobilize equipment and crews to aid the victims and tackle cleanup on a grand scale.

One year later, the world is still struggling to put the scope of the disaster into perspective: 220,000 lives lost in 12 countries due to the undersea tremor that measured 9.15 on the Richter scale. Rebuilding in the region is just now in its initial stages, and could take between five and 10 years to complete. Indonesia alone, which reported some 168,000 deaths, is looking at about $4.5 billion in reconstruction costs.

And the world continues to struggle with feeding and caring for those displaced by the tsunami: cleaning the land, restoring drinking water systems and rebuilding schools are only a some of the projects now underway, one year later.

The relative calm in the wake of the tsunami left the world unprepared for the ire of Hurricane Katrina, which tallied more modest numbers in terms of fatalities, but revealed a new level of darkness for humanity.

The category 5 storm literally brought the most powerful nation on earth to its knees, obliterating an outdated levee system and leaving residents - the majority being poor and black - to fend mostly for themselves for water, shelter and food until a slow-moving Federal Emergency Management Agency mobilized to provide relief. While reconstruction is underway to restore New Orleans, the American government may struggle for a long time to rebuild its tattered image.

Mother Nature wasn't done, though, and wielded her power in October with an earthquake in north Pakistan. While early tolls were placed at about 87,000 deaths, the number won't be final until the region survives its harsh winter months - not an easy challenge given that 85 per cent of the structures were destroyed, leaving some 30,000 people homeless.

They say one should never wish away time, but it's time to bid a heartfelt goodbye to a year full of death and destruction. And to pray for a calm year in which to rebuild and heal.

Stormy weather

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

Mother Nature certainly put her foot down over the past year, humbling the powerful, devastating whole regions and wreaking havoc with the world economy.

As Christmas festivities wound down in 2004 and Boxing Day shoppers poised to turn the calendar page, the tsunami in south-east Asia struck. Horrified, we watched as the the death toll continued to climb, reaching unimaginable heights as aid workers scrambled to mobilize equipment and crews to aid the victims and tackle cleanup on a grand scale.

One year later, the world is still struggling to put the scope of the disaster into perspective: 220,000 lives lost in 12 countries due to the undersea tremor that measured 9.15 on the Richter scale. Rebuilding in the region is just now in its initial stages, and could take between five and 10 years to complete. Indonesia alone, which reported some 168,000 deaths, is looking at about $4.5 billion in reconstruction costs.

And the world continues to struggle with feeding and caring for those displaced by the tsunami: cleaning the land, restoring drinking water systems and rebuilding schools are only a some of the projects now underway, one year later.

The relative calm in the wake of the tsunami left the world unprepared for the ire of Hurricane Katrina, which tallied more modest numbers in terms of fatalities, but revealed a new level of darkness for humanity.

The category 5 storm literally brought the most powerful nation on earth to its knees, obliterating an outdated levee system and leaving residents - the majority being poor and black - to fend mostly for themselves for water, shelter and food until a slow-moving Federal Emergency Management Agency mobilized to provide relief. While reconstruction is underway to restore New Orleans, the American government may struggle for a long time to rebuild its tattered image.

Mother Nature wasn't done, though, and wielded her power in October with an earthquake in north Pakistan. While early tolls were placed at about 87,000 deaths, the number won't be final until the region survives its harsh winter months - not an easy challenge given that 85 per cent of the structures were destroyed, leaving some 30,000 people homeless.

They say one should never wish away time, but it's time to bid a heartfelt goodbye to a year full of death and destruction. And to pray for a calm year in which to rebuild and heal.