A year for getting involved and making a difference

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It was a year of many accomplishments as well as a few disappointments. Yes, 2005 was pretty much like any other year on the local news scene. Area residents and groups continued to dominate the headlines, making the news interesting and exciting for those of us who report it - and hopefully just as stimulating for our readers.

The year started off with plans unveiled for a new event, designed to take away the winter blahs and get the community involved in some great outdoor fun. A Winterfest, complete with outdoor skating, festive lights, tobogganing, sleigh rides, cookie decorating and hot chocolate was planned for Waterdown's Memorial Park. The idea for the festival was the brainchild of a local businessman and had all the earmarks of success, but unfortunately Mother Nature had other plans. The weather just didn't cooperate and the lack of snow, combined with the presence of many slippery ice patches throughout the park, caused cancellation of the event just days before its scheduled debut on February 19.

It was a disappointing turn of events for organizers as well as those who had planned to attend, but also served as an important reminder that outdoor events, whether staged in the winter or summer, are very much at the mercy of the elements.

Last March, it was a pleasure to join other Flamborough and area residents at a celebration on Hamilton's Barton Street which marked the realization of a dream for a Waterdown couple. The Helping Hands Street Mission, founded by Helen and Tom Norris, opened a storefront in Hamilton's core to provide the homeless with free clothing donated by residents of Flamborough and neighbouring communities.

The official ribbon-cutting was a joyous occasion for the couple who, along with volunteers, man the store three times a week and hope someday to get enough volunteer help to keep it open all five weekdays.

On a much less positive note, very disappointing news emerged in May. The plug was pulled on the Giant's Rib Discovery Centre project, an eco-tourism facility focusing on the Niagara Escarpment which many had hoped to see built near Clappison's Corners. The inability to secure the site with the guarantee of a good access led to the project's downfall. Hopefully, the vision for the Centre isn't entirely dead and the idea will re-appear at a more fortuitous time.

The diligence of area residents in banding together to voice their opinions on government decisions which affect them continued to be featured in the Review throughout the year.

Residents on the 11th Concession in northeast Flamborough mounted their attack on plans for a quarry in their area, de-amalgamationists turned their attention toward investigating various restructuring models in hopes of persuading the province to take a second look at other forms of local government, Waterdown citizens voiced their objections to roads proposed to run through the core of the village the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Plan, and the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce along with the Waterdown Business Improvement Area (BIA) successfully negotiated significant concessions from developers of a proposed big-box complex at Clappison's Corners.

Also notable was Mayor Larry Di Ianni's fulfillment of an election promise to form a Flamborough community council advisory committee.

These and other events signify a community that is responsive and, most importantly, interactive in the process of local government. It shows how important communities are to people and how citizens are willing to embrace responsibility for the future of the places they call "home."

Much of the news is about citizen reaction to events that affect our community.

That's why local news stories continue to reflect the concerns and accomplishments of citizens. It's the people dynamics that make the news an interesting commodity - and we can safely predict that there will be more of the same in 2006.

A year for getting involved and making a difference

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It was a year of many accomplishments as well as a few disappointments. Yes, 2005 was pretty much like any other year on the local news scene. Area residents and groups continued to dominate the headlines, making the news interesting and exciting for those of us who report it - and hopefully just as stimulating for our readers.

The year started off with plans unveiled for a new event, designed to take away the winter blahs and get the community involved in some great outdoor fun. A Winterfest, complete with outdoor skating, festive lights, tobogganing, sleigh rides, cookie decorating and hot chocolate was planned for Waterdown's Memorial Park. The idea for the festival was the brainchild of a local businessman and had all the earmarks of success, but unfortunately Mother Nature had other plans. The weather just didn't cooperate and the lack of snow, combined with the presence of many slippery ice patches throughout the park, caused cancellation of the event just days before its scheduled debut on February 19.

It was a disappointing turn of events for organizers as well as those who had planned to attend, but also served as an important reminder that outdoor events, whether staged in the winter or summer, are very much at the mercy of the elements.

Last March, it was a pleasure to join other Flamborough and area residents at a celebration on Hamilton's Barton Street which marked the realization of a dream for a Waterdown couple. The Helping Hands Street Mission, founded by Helen and Tom Norris, opened a storefront in Hamilton's core to provide the homeless with free clothing donated by residents of Flamborough and neighbouring communities.

The official ribbon-cutting was a joyous occasion for the couple who, along with volunteers, man the store three times a week and hope someday to get enough volunteer help to keep it open all five weekdays.

On a much less positive note, very disappointing news emerged in May. The plug was pulled on the Giant's Rib Discovery Centre project, an eco-tourism facility focusing on the Niagara Escarpment which many had hoped to see built near Clappison's Corners. The inability to secure the site with the guarantee of a good access led to the project's downfall. Hopefully, the vision for the Centre isn't entirely dead and the idea will re-appear at a more fortuitous time.

The diligence of area residents in banding together to voice their opinions on government decisions which affect them continued to be featured in the Review throughout the year.

Residents on the 11th Concession in northeast Flamborough mounted their attack on plans for a quarry in their area, de-amalgamationists turned their attention toward investigating various restructuring models in hopes of persuading the province to take a second look at other forms of local government, Waterdown citizens voiced their objections to roads proposed to run through the core of the village the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Plan, and the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce along with the Waterdown Business Improvement Area (BIA) successfully negotiated significant concessions from developers of a proposed big-box complex at Clappison's Corners.

Also notable was Mayor Larry Di Ianni's fulfillment of an election promise to form a Flamborough community council advisory committee.

These and other events signify a community that is responsive and, most importantly, interactive in the process of local government. It shows how important communities are to people and how citizens are willing to embrace responsibility for the future of the places they call "home."

Much of the news is about citizen reaction to events that affect our community.

That's why local news stories continue to reflect the concerns and accomplishments of citizens. It's the people dynamics that make the news an interesting commodity - and we can safely predict that there will be more of the same in 2006.

A year for getting involved and making a difference

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

It was a year of many accomplishments as well as a few disappointments. Yes, 2005 was pretty much like any other year on the local news scene. Area residents and groups continued to dominate the headlines, making the news interesting and exciting for those of us who report it - and hopefully just as stimulating for our readers.

The year started off with plans unveiled for a new event, designed to take away the winter blahs and get the community involved in some great outdoor fun. A Winterfest, complete with outdoor skating, festive lights, tobogganing, sleigh rides, cookie decorating and hot chocolate was planned for Waterdown's Memorial Park. The idea for the festival was the brainchild of a local businessman and had all the earmarks of success, but unfortunately Mother Nature had other plans. The weather just didn't cooperate and the lack of snow, combined with the presence of many slippery ice patches throughout the park, caused cancellation of the event just days before its scheduled debut on February 19.

It was a disappointing turn of events for organizers as well as those who had planned to attend, but also served as an important reminder that outdoor events, whether staged in the winter or summer, are very much at the mercy of the elements.

Last March, it was a pleasure to join other Flamborough and area residents at a celebration on Hamilton's Barton Street which marked the realization of a dream for a Waterdown couple. The Helping Hands Street Mission, founded by Helen and Tom Norris, opened a storefront in Hamilton's core to provide the homeless with free clothing donated by residents of Flamborough and neighbouring communities.

The official ribbon-cutting was a joyous occasion for the couple who, along with volunteers, man the store three times a week and hope someday to get enough volunteer help to keep it open all five weekdays.

On a much less positive note, very disappointing news emerged in May. The plug was pulled on the Giant's Rib Discovery Centre project, an eco-tourism facility focusing on the Niagara Escarpment which many had hoped to see built near Clappison's Corners. The inability to secure the site with the guarantee of a good access led to the project's downfall. Hopefully, the vision for the Centre isn't entirely dead and the idea will re-appear at a more fortuitous time.

The diligence of area residents in banding together to voice their opinions on government decisions which affect them continued to be featured in the Review throughout the year.

Residents on the 11th Concession in northeast Flamborough mounted their attack on plans for a quarry in their area, de-amalgamationists turned their attention toward investigating various restructuring models in hopes of persuading the province to take a second look at other forms of local government, Waterdown citizens voiced their objections to roads proposed to run through the core of the village the Waterdown-Aldershot Transportation Plan, and the Flamborough Chamber of Commerce along with the Waterdown Business Improvement Area (BIA) successfully negotiated significant concessions from developers of a proposed big-box complex at Clappison's Corners.

Also notable was Mayor Larry Di Ianni's fulfillment of an election promise to form a Flamborough community council advisory committee.

These and other events signify a community that is responsive and, most importantly, interactive in the process of local government. It shows how important communities are to people and how citizens are willing to embrace responsibility for the future of the places they call "home."

Much of the news is about citizen reaction to events that affect our community.

That's why local news stories continue to reflect the concerns and accomplishments of citizens. It's the people dynamics that make the news an interesting commodity - and we can safely predict that there will be more of the same in 2006.