Municipal election nominations opened for November vote

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

If you're breathlessly waiting until January 23 for the end of elections, take heed. Hamilton's municipal election campaign officially began January 3 and won't end until November 13.

Residents who are Canadian citizens, 18 years or older, who own or rent land in the municipality and are interested in putting their political acumen to the test, can fill out a nomination form for mayor, councillor or trustee at the city clerk's office, or at any municipal services centre, said Tony Fallis, the city's election coordinator.

Nomination forms will also be available on the city's website at www.myhamilton.ca by the end of January, he said.

It will cost $100 for people interested in running for council or school board and $200 for a mayoral candidate to file their papers. The winning candidates for mayor, councillor and trustee will receive their deposits back.

Nominations will close at 5 p.m. September 29. A person can withdraw from running up to a week after the nominations close, said Fallis.

Fallis will begin establishing a list of candidates on the city's website by next week.

"I don't want to get too far behind," he said. "We want to be ready just in case."

Candidates, especially mayoralty ones, fill out their nomination papers early, to allow them time to raise money for their campaign and incur expenses, he said.

Candidates should familiarize themselves with election regulations by getting a municipal elections guide from the provincial government or from Municipal World.

The city will have the guides ready by spring, said Fallis.

Candidates should especially pay attention to fundraising and monitoring their election expenses.

Mayor Larry Di Ianni's 2003 campaign documents have been under the public and legal microscope since Dundas businesswoman Joanna Chapman asked for, and ultimately won, a court case to have Di Ianni's, and council candidates John Best's and Marvin Caplan's campaign documents reviewed by a city-appointed auditor.

ELECTION AUDIT

Di Ianni has returned about $20,000 to donors. Under the Municipal Elections Act, corporations and individuals are only allowed to contribute $750 to a candidate.

Under the Municipal Elections Act, a candidate who raises more than $10,000 during a campaign is required to appoint an auditor.

Fallis said the city will host a candidate information session some time at the end of May to educate prospective candidates on the ins and outs of properly administering a campaign.

"There is a lot of financial information to understand and it is the candidate who is ultimately responsible for what happens," he said.

Municipal election nominations opened for November vote

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

If you're breathlessly waiting until January 23 for the end of elections, take heed. Hamilton's municipal election campaign officially began January 3 and won't end until November 13.

Residents who are Canadian citizens, 18 years or older, who own or rent land in the municipality and are interested in putting their political acumen to the test, can fill out a nomination form for mayor, councillor or trustee at the city clerk's office, or at any municipal services centre, said Tony Fallis, the city's election coordinator.

Nomination forms will also be available on the city's website at www.myhamilton.ca by the end of January, he said.

It will cost $100 for people interested in running for council or school board and $200 for a mayoral candidate to file their papers. The winning candidates for mayor, councillor and trustee will receive their deposits back.

Nominations will close at 5 p.m. September 29. A person can withdraw from running up to a week after the nominations close, said Fallis.

Fallis will begin establishing a list of candidates on the city's website by next week.

"I don't want to get too far behind," he said. "We want to be ready just in case."

Candidates, especially mayoralty ones, fill out their nomination papers early, to allow them time to raise money for their campaign and incur expenses, he said.

Candidates should familiarize themselves with election regulations by getting a municipal elections guide from the provincial government or from Municipal World.

The city will have the guides ready by spring, said Fallis.

Candidates should especially pay attention to fundraising and monitoring their election expenses.

Mayor Larry Di Ianni's 2003 campaign documents have been under the public and legal microscope since Dundas businesswoman Joanna Chapman asked for, and ultimately won, a court case to have Di Ianni's, and council candidates John Best's and Marvin Caplan's campaign documents reviewed by a city-appointed auditor.

ELECTION AUDIT

Di Ianni has returned about $20,000 to donors. Under the Municipal Elections Act, corporations and individuals are only allowed to contribute $750 to a candidate.

Under the Municipal Elections Act, a candidate who raises more than $10,000 during a campaign is required to appoint an auditor.

Fallis said the city will host a candidate information session some time at the end of May to educate prospective candidates on the ins and outs of properly administering a campaign.

"There is a lot of financial information to understand and it is the candidate who is ultimately responsible for what happens," he said.

Municipal election nominations opened for November vote

News Nov 22, 2006 Flamborough Review

If you're breathlessly waiting until January 23 for the end of elections, take heed. Hamilton's municipal election campaign officially began January 3 and won't end until November 13.

Residents who are Canadian citizens, 18 years or older, who own or rent land in the municipality and are interested in putting their political acumen to the test, can fill out a nomination form for mayor, councillor or trustee at the city clerk's office, or at any municipal services centre, said Tony Fallis, the city's election coordinator.

Nomination forms will also be available on the city's website at www.myhamilton.ca by the end of January, he said.

It will cost $100 for people interested in running for council or school board and $200 for a mayoral candidate to file their papers. The winning candidates for mayor, councillor and trustee will receive their deposits back.

Nominations will close at 5 p.m. September 29. A person can withdraw from running up to a week after the nominations close, said Fallis.

Fallis will begin establishing a list of candidates on the city's website by next week.

"I don't want to get too far behind," he said. "We want to be ready just in case."

Candidates, especially mayoralty ones, fill out their nomination papers early, to allow them time to raise money for their campaign and incur expenses, he said.

Candidates should familiarize themselves with election regulations by getting a municipal elections guide from the provincial government or from Municipal World.

The city will have the guides ready by spring, said Fallis.

Candidates should especially pay attention to fundraising and monitoring their election expenses.

Mayor Larry Di Ianni's 2003 campaign documents have been under the public and legal microscope since Dundas businesswoman Joanna Chapman asked for, and ultimately won, a court case to have Di Ianni's, and council candidates John Best's and Marvin Caplan's campaign documents reviewed by a city-appointed auditor.

ELECTION AUDIT

Di Ianni has returned about $20,000 to donors. Under the Municipal Elections Act, corporations and individuals are only allowed to contribute $750 to a candidate.

Under the Municipal Elections Act, a candidate who raises more than $10,000 during a campaign is required to appoint an auditor.

Fallis said the city will host a candidate information session some time at the end of May to educate prospective candidates on the ins and outs of properly administering a campaign.

"There is a lot of financial information to understand and it is the candidate who is ultimately responsible for what happens," he said.